#1
I got this Les Paul from a friend. Bought a new tailpiece and bridge from guitar fetish. Plugged the sucker in and it hums and buzzes like nobody's business. I put the strings on and it made no difference. The buzzing interrupts or crackles whenever I touch something metal on the guitar- pickups, strings, tuners, tailpiece, or bridge.

I checked and no wires seem loose with the jack, pickups, or knobs.

What I did notice was that whenever I switch a toggle from "normal" to "treble" the buzzing gets worse. When I switch it to "rhythm" the buzzing eases slightly.

Also, check this image of the guitar:
http://www.geocities.com/juan_canary/IMG_0003.JPG

I don't know what the switches do- but I do know that if you turn number 1 and 2 all the way "up" (I assume 'up' because turning it all the way the other direction suddenly makes the guitar not buzz or send input to the amp), the buzzing stops but the guitar still sends input to the amp. The sound comes out really, really bassy and deep with no real... substance to it.

If I turn.. 3 or 4, one of them, damn can't remember, the buzzing pretty much ceases. I assume those two knobs adjust treble and bass, because I'm assuming there is something wrong with the treble adjustment which turning treble "off" eases the buzzing. I really have no idea if this is true or not, just that wiggling the knobs to certain directions pretty much stops buzzing, but the sound comes out with only a few bits of the deepest frequency coming out.

I can't tune the guitar because I can't hear notes... augh. I don't know what to do, any idea?

BTW its not the amp because my acoustic/electric plugs into it with absolutely no buzzing. And it is not an amp specifically for accoustic/electric- its an Epiphone for electric (and the guitar is epiphone too.. i wonder if they don't match...)

-Kri
#2
It sounds like you don't have the new bridge grounded. Or you have shit wiring.

EDIT: Open the guitar up and take pictures of the wiring. Make sure they are clear and the wires are easily visible. Make sure there are no loose wires.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
Last edited by Will_Minus at Mar 9, 2007,
#4
You have to have a ground wire connected to the bridge. Otherwise you will get nasty hum.

I'm guessing that may be the problem because you replaced the bridge and didn't solder the ground wire back.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#5
And there lies the problem. I had no idea it had to be ground. In fact I just slapped the thing on the two metal screws and that was it. If its not too much trouble, mind departing some electronic wisdom to as how to ground this baby? I'm going to take a look in it now. If you still need those pics, let me know- roommate is out of town with the digital camera so it will be at least 12 hours.

Oh and thanks. You're a guitar saver.
#7
In a guitar, the grounding point is usually the bottom of the volume pot (just look for a pot that has a bunch of wires soldered to the bottom of it. One of those wires probably isn't connected to anything, and that needs to be soldered to the bridge.
"A wise man once said, never discuss philosophy or politics in a disco environment." - Frank Zappa
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Don't question the X.
<Frenchy> I'm such a failure
#8
I popped out the threated metal pieces that the screws for the bridge went into and there is solid wood underneath, no space for wires... Um, So I'm thinking you mean something else. By volume pot, you mean the cavity for the wires that connect the knobs like in the top image (1-4)? I'll check there. I swear if this guitar was built without a connection wire.... *mumble*
#9
It was probably connected to the tailpeice.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#10
I popped those out too, also solid bottom inside. Perhaps it was designed poorly and I need to take it to a repair shop or something.
#11
That's odd. Take a picture of the control cavity.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#13
The guitar is an Epiphone Les Paul. Not a junior.

Here is a picture of the insides (two acutally),
http://www.geocities.com/juan_canary/inside01.JPG
http://www.geocities.com/juan_canary/inside02.JPG


OH HEY I FOUND THE GROUND in one of the holes for the tail piece. From that angle the ground looks in tact- it could be that the glue was separating the ground from the metal? Maybe... I don't know. I'm sure they were http://www.geocities.com/juan_canary/ground.JPG
#15
Well I put it all back together and it still has a wicked hum. Now the ground wire is against the tail piece insert and the ground wire seemingly connects to one of the knobs. Still a wicked hum. No idea. Doesn't make sense.
#17
Yes the hum stops when i touch the strings, tuning knobs, bridge or tailpiece
#19
That tutorial is too advanced for me by much. I'll have to take it to someone. Thank you everyone for the abundance of help.