#1
Probably not the best titled thread, but whatever. I searched and couldn't find the answer, so if I missed something, please point it out and I will delete this thread.

I remember seeing in another thread that someone was asking what chords would go well after these chords: Am C9 F9. So I read the thread, some people said, "Go with E7, then back to Am" I played it on my guitar and was wondering, how can you tell that those chords would sound good following the others? Is it experience? Is there some sort of tension? Is it the bassline? Also, what is the theory behind this all?

Thank you
#3
Thanks for the link, man, but I mean, how can you identify the chords that will go with previous chords? Can you tell just by knowing how the chords sound from so many times? Do you find the key of the progression and choose a turnaround/turnback? What if the progression doesn't stay in one key? Can you tell by looking at the notes in the chord and then moving up by certain intervals?

That kind of thing. I get the whole chords in keys and chord progressions that work well with those keys thing (well to a certain degree).
#4
You have to listen very intently at the way different chords sound, and then pick which ones you think will sound good when put back to back.

Many songs' chord progressions don't stay in one key, you just have to find which ones sound good together. I know this takes a very long time, but it will be worth it after the time.

Sorry i dont get the last question lol.
#5
Quote by YourMessiah666
You have to listen very intently at the way different chords sound, and then pick which ones you think will sound good when put back to back.

Many songs' chord progressions don't stay in one key, you just have to find which ones sound good together. I know this takes a very long time, but it will be worth it after the time.

Sorry i dont get the last question lol.

I don't either

But thanks - I just wanted to know if there was a way you could tell or if it was basically experience.
#6
Yeah i, personally learnt it by experience. But there is probably a way of learning it. Its probably harder, and invloves more steps.
#7
Well, there is no denying that the V7 of a key resolves great to the I. This is especially true (I find) if it's a V7b9, even more tension to release.

You should research on cadences a bit. Learning about voice leading will also give you information you seek.
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#8
Quote by nightwind
Well, there is no denying that the V7 of a key resolves great to the I. This is especially true (I find) if it's a V7b9, even more tension to release.

This man is correct, but wouldn't in this case the b9 just be an octave (a flattened F)?
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#9
Quote by Hawker45
This man is correct, but wouldn't in this case the b9 just be an octave (a flattened F)?

I'm pretty sure a b9 would be enharmonic to a b2, which is one semitone above the octave.
#10
Quote by Dayn
I'm pretty sure a b9 would be enharmonic to a b2, which is one semitone above the octave.

But in the key of Am, F is the 9th right?
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Because 14 yr olds + teh internetz = liez

I made that up in math class.

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#11
Quote by Hawker45
But in the key of Am, F is the 9th right?


No, Am consists of the notes
A B C D E F G
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

As you can see F a minor 6th above A
The second/ninth above A is B
if you flatten it you get Bb
Dayn is right.
#12
Quote by bigmanwithanaxe
No, Am consists of the notes
A B C D E F G
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

As you can see F a minor 6th above A
The second/ninth above A is B
if you flatten it you get Bb
Dayn is right.


Ah yes i know that but in the context of playing an E7 chord? Sorry if im being a bit persistent but i gotta understand this

And i checked this and this http://www.looknohands.com/chordhouse/guitar/index_rb.html]site it says the b9 would be an F when playing an Eb9. Sorry if you didn't understand my question.
  E 7-9
a.k.a.: E7b9, E7(add b9)
intervals: 1,3,(5),b7,b9
half-steps: 4-6-3 (excl. optional notes)
half-steps: 4-3-3-3 (incl. optional notes)
notes: E,G#,(B),D,F
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Because 14 yr olds + teh internetz = liez

I made that up in math class.

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Michael Romeo- You think he plays fast? You should watch him eat cream pies.
#13
Well, thinking in key, look up the concept of tonic -> dominant prep -> dominant -> tonic and see which chords fall under that category in your key.

Just off the top of my head... the V7 chord resolves very well into the I chord. IV -> V sounds good too.
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