#1
I have a dilemma , I've been playing for 1 year and well I listen to songs by ear and usually right away I can play the first chord on my guitar and nail it and after that I can figure out most of the rest of the song (unless its some crazy jazz piece) but, even though I can figure out songs by ear I still feel as though I'm not learning the song. By learning I mean like knowing the theory behind it and why everything is how it is. I feel like i'm wasting my time learning by ear because I could figure the song much faster via tab and still have the same understanding (or well in this case lack of) of the song. Is there something I'm missing. Would using tab to learn a song and learning the theory behind why something sounds how it does be as beneficial as figuring out a song by ear and figuring out the theory behind it. Is their something deeper I have to listen to or am I over analyzing the whole situation and should continue playing by ear.

Thanks in advanced and sorry if you don't understand what I'm trying to say.
#2
Find the "official" sheet music? Do as much research as you can about the piece. Try to find sheet music to it if possible. Sheet music is put out by professionals, so it's going to be more correct than some of these pathetic tabs I see.

Also you may benefit from some solfege exercises. Like know what a jump between the root and the 5th sounds like and how to pick out chord changes and the progressions. Start writing songs down and compare them with similar sounding pieces.
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#3
its not figuring out songs thats the problem I can do that pretty easy with songs within my level

also do you think you can link me to these solfege excercises they seem like what i'm looking for

thanks
#5
Hi Fenderbenda, There's a lot you can learn without becoming just totally a sightreading type of player. Almost all the best players play mostly by ear, but know what chords they're playing, modes etc. etc. Sounds as though your ear is fairly good. That's great. You should start by knowing what the chords are called (if you don't already) & making little chord charts for the tunes. Perhaps you're past that already & ready to learn scales, basic chords, triads & extentions, what modes work best over what changes etc. I can't tell exactly where your playing's at from your post, but there are some good books. My roommate, Dave Wood wrote one that seemed good. Try a lesson or two.
Good luck
#6
I highly do not recommend learning by tab. Right now, you're training your ears to hear the diffferent harmonic intervals. What I think you should do, is learn a song by ear, then tab it out. Then what you should do is sit down and do a full harmonic analysis. What's the chord progression? Cadences? Motives? Phrases? Etc.
#7
Quote by Vittu0666
I highly do not recommend learning by tab. Right now, you're training your ears to hear the diffferent harmonic intervals. What I think you should do, is learn a song by ear, then tab it out. Then what you should do is sit down and do a full harmonic analysis. What's the chord progression? Cadences? Motives? Phrases? Etc.


yes, indeed.
#8
It's definitely worth persisting with learning songs by ear, it's the best training any musician can do. The theory is the easy stuff.

I'll assume you don't know any theory and lay out a simple plan

Play C major in 2 octaves.

C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

Build a chord from the 1st, 3rd and 5th (later on add the seventh) note

the first chord in the scale now is C E G (that's C major)

Now do the same thing but start from the second note
the second chord of the scale is D F A (D minor)

Do this down the line, the third chord will be E (something), the 4th F etc.

Look at the first interval, is it major or minor? If it's 3 half steps (frets) it's a minor chord, 4 it's major

Do it for all the major scales

Do it again and add the 7th

Once you know all the chords in a scale you'll be able to match them to the ones your hearing.

This is true for most music styles, some heavier / punk tunes don't even worry about the 3rd but you can still use this idea , just play the fifth interval (without the third)

Easy
#9
Quote by manual vibrato
Hi Fenderbenda, There's a lot you can learn without becoming just totally a sightreading type of player. Almost all the best players play mostly by ear, but know what chords they're playing, modes etc. etc. Sounds as though your ear is fairly good. That's great. You should start by knowing what the chords are called (if you don't already) & making little chord charts for the tunes. Perhaps you're past that already & ready to learn scales, basic chords, triads & extentions, what modes work best over what changes etc. I can't tell exactly where your playing's at from your post, but there are some good books. My roommate, Dave Wood wrote one that seemed good. Try a lesson or two.
Good luck

Thanks for the response, I've been doing that lately, writing the chords to a song and such, and now i'm trying to figure out the solo and the correlation between the notes in the solo and the chords being played in the background, although i'm gaining ground slowly I feel my ear is growing exceptionally, thanks again

Quote by Vittu0666
I highly do not recommend learning by tab. Right now, you're training your ears to hear the diffferent harmonic intervals. What I think you should do, is learn a song by ear, then tab it out. Then what you should do is sit down and do a full harmonic analysis. What's the chord progression? Cadences? Motives? Phrases? Etc.


Thats what i'm currently doing with the Jeff Beck song Rock My Plimsoul although not the hardest its a good song to get me started on my endeavor.


Patrick Curley: Yes I should work on recognizing my scales and what not. Although I know my scales, unlike with most chords I cannot identify them as well and end up utilizing a trail and error technique to find the scale of the song.

thanks for the helpful insight i'll be sure to implement these ideas into my practice schedule.