#1
Right, so I know all the modes of the Major, Harmonic Minor and Melodic Minor scales. I know the theory and I spend all day jamming with them. But, for some reason when I want to land on the root, it seems to always... never resolve. It mostly leads to the root of the father scale.

Not so much with the modes of the Harm. Minor and the Mel. Minor, but mostly with the modes of the major. And it seems to happen a lot with a mode containing a b7.

Any help, tips, ideas would be great! How I love MT.

-BR
DANNY

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#3
I do that all the time, it just doesn't seem "there". It does seem stronger though.
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
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#4
The tonality of the major scale is a lot stronger than anyone of it's respective modes, and our ears always tend to gravitate towards a major sound - which is why a lot modes need to be brought back to a 'final' often to emphasize the tonal center of the piece, and this has a lot to do with what chords you choose, and is the reason why we choose chord X over chord Y.

For example, take the phrygian mode. Most people associate the Phrygian scale with the m7 chord, so you would play E phrygian over Em7, but it's hard to get a stable phrygian sound over a m7 chord. Look at how Em7 is built: E - G - B - D. Two of those notes are harmonically stronger in C than they are in E. The G note is the fifth of C which strengthens the role of C in the melody, and B is the leading tone in C. Both of these notes demand to hear C as the tonal center, and any E note you drone isn't enough to draw the ear away from that. Try playing E Phrygian over an Em chord and land on E, it will just sound like you're playing C major over an Em chord and resolving to the third.

Now, if we take the G and B out of that chord, and add two notes (the b2 and 4) we get E - F - A - D. Which is an Esusb9 chord which strengthens the phrygian sound.

The same applies to something like F Lydian - a lot people tend to play it over Fmaj and emphazise the #4. Take a look at what the #4 note is... B. Playing F Lydian over Fmaj and land on B and your ear will always want to go to C, because B is the leading tone of C. This is also why the Lydian chord is considered to be Fmaj7#11 and not Fmaj9#11, because the 9 of F Lydian is G which is the 5th of C, and that note strengenths the role of C.

Another thing to consider is the way the chord is voiced - most music tends to use tertian chords, chords voiced in thirds, but in more modern jazz the sound of tertian chords are becoming increasingly rare in order to rid the familiarity with the sound of the major scale, which is why you'll see a lot of susb9 chords, 7sus4 chord and m11 chords in jazz because they are mostly built in 4ths (D - G - C - F is a common Gsus voicing, D - G - C - F - A is a common Dm11 voicing). These two voicings immediately sound odd and don't establish a key center, which leaves that up to you. Play my Dm11 voicing and emphasize G Mixolydian over it and it will sound like a G9sus chord, emphasize Dorian over it (or even just get your bass player to drone a D note while your guitarist plays my Gsus voicing).. and it will sound like a Dm11 chord - because the way they are built does not lend themselves to establish a tonal center that we automatically hear when we listen to chords built in thirds - and this is what you want, to be able to freely establish a tonal center, not have the tonal center established for you.

#5
Quote by Johnljones7443
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notes are harmonically stronger

(D - G - C - F is a common Gsus voicing, D - G - C - F - A is a common Dm11 voicing). These two voicings immediately sound odd and don't establish a key center, which leaves that up to you. Play my Dm11 voicing and emphasize G Mixolydian over it and it will sound like a G9sus chord, emphasize Dorian over it (or even just get your bass player to drone a D note while your guitarist plays my Gsus voicing).. and it will sound like a Dm11 chord - because the way they are built does not lend themselves to establish a tonal center that we automatically hear when we listen to chords built in thirds - and this is what you want, to be able to freely establish a tonal center, not have the tonal center established for you.



Alright. I don't quite get the last bit, though I already knew how to build chords on 4ths (and I love doing so). Also a question about the notesbeing harmonically stronger, is there like any particular order?

Dayamn you typed lots. Thanks!
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??
#6
Quote by bluesrocker101
Also a question about the notesbeing harmonically stronger, is there like any particular order?
Yes, it's called the order of strengths: 1 3 5 7 9 11 13. Or, 1 3 5 7 2 4 6.


*Courtesy of Redwing.