#1
Hi ,

I have always wondered ever since i started playing barre chords why exactly they have that shape ...can someone explain it to me ....if i don't barre for a B major which is originally X24442 ....and play a XX444X ....will i be playing the wrong chord ? it pretty much sounds the same to me
#2
well, you're not playing the root note with XX444X, so i guess it's not B major

I put my tobacco under my upper lip, just like anyone would do.

Yamaha RGX A2, Fender FM 212R.
#3
Quote by Buckethead5
well, you're not playing the root note with XX444X, so i guess it's not B major
No, but he DOES have a B in there and it does sound the same, though I'm not sure about this.
The 4th on the G string is a B, XX444X (marked with BOLD )
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#4
oh yeah.. didn't think about that

I put my tobacco under my upper lip, just like anyone would do.

Yamaha RGX A2, Fender FM 212R.
#5
It is a b major cause you got the root, the 3rd and the 5th note. When you're barring that it just adds an extra b and f# which makes the chord sound thicker or bigger. And they have that shape because they are just open string chord shapes moved up the neck. That shape there is an a chord moved up. 002220. When you bar you're using your first finger as a nut pretty much and you're just moving it up the neck.
#6
Quote by inlovewithmusic
Hi ,

I have always wondered ever since i started playing barre chords why exactly they have that shape ...can someone explain it to me ....if i don't barre for a B major which is originally X24442 ....and play a XX444X ....will i be playing the wrong chord ? it pretty much sounds the same to me


X24442 = Bmaj
XX444X = Bmaj/F#

But Bmaj/F# Is often played 224442 for more sound
Last edited by xFilth at Mar 11, 2007,
#7
Well, it makes it easier to play a large variety of chords by simply moving it around the fretboard.

Assuming EADGBE...

Take E major: 022100
In order of scale degrees, you have 1 5 1 3 5 1, which makes a major chord.

What if you want E minor? You just flatten the third: 022000
Which gives 1 5 1 b3 5 1.

What if you wanted E minor 7? You add the dominant (I believe?) seventh: 020000
Which gives 1 5 b7 b3 5 1.


So really, the barre chord in standard tuning is an excellent shape for moving anywhere, and you can create any variety of chords by simply moving a few fingers. I think that's what you were asking? It's that way 'cause it's simple and powerful.
#8
Quote by xFilth
X24442 = Bmaj
XX444X = Bmaj/F#

But Bmaj/F# Is often played 224442 for more sound



what exactly is a Bmaj/F# ? i mean what does that denotation mean ...
#9
The left of the slash is what chord it is, the right of it is what note is in the bass (the lowest note of the voicing)
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#10
Quote by inlovewithmusic
what exactly is a Bmaj/F# ? i mean what does that denotation mean ...


That means that you take the chord and change the root.

In B Major you have the following notes: B F# D#

So if you rearrange those in the formation that has previously been mentioned, F# is the lowest note being and therefore you could call it 'Bmaj/F#' (though it is ntoe necessary and you could call it 'B' if you wanted.)