#1
i do lead guitars in a metal band called desecrated. just to get an idea of the line up, we have two guitars, vocals, bass and drums, so its not just one guitar player. but we just found our bass player so when he comes to practice im not really sure what he should technically be playing and where he should be as far as a role goes in the music.

any help would be great. thanks.
#2
personally i think bass should be loud as possible. it also depends on how well ur bassist is. if hes good then i suggest he plays like cliff burton. if he sux then well, his bass lines should just follow the guitar.
#3
like thats what im kinda wondering like if i should just teach him how to play somewhat what the guitar is playing, obviously simplified to be played on bass and mostly just the actual bass notes of what the guitar is playing. i mean the guy is alright, he's pretty mediocre. so im not sure which way to side.
#6
How about you give him the choice?

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#7
Ask him what he wants to do.

Probably won't need him though. The typical metal band I hear, the guitars are far thicker than the Bass will ever be. Unless he actually goes beyond the roots you probably won't need him.


And that is why I don't lisen to alot of metal...
#8
yea i mean, as far as im concerned like when me and my other guitarist are doing like harmonized leads and stuff, its good to have a little more depth there. so i guess i just kinda want to know how he should be doing that.
#9
its easy, just show him your songs, the chords and the changes, ask him to write basslines for them, if he is any good then make the bass loud and clear if he sucks then he will have to stick to root notes, wich sucks....

listen to Iron Maiden if you want great bass on your metal!


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#10
Quote by sum1udunno
if hes good then i suggest he plays like cliff burton.
Sorry for my lack of knowledge in bass things but how did he play loll??? I know that he's was the bassist for Metallica(before he died) but I don't know what was his particular style or whatever huh...
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

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#11
Cliff was very energetic bass player and instead of just following roots he put alot of his own stuff on it and occasionally had some magical solos
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#12
Root notes & progressions first. Then he can start adding riffs and fills. Harmonized guitars go nicely when the underlying progression is maintained by the drums and bass. Later on maybe do some lines where the bass plays a harmonized not under the guitars (i.e. you're playing an E chord and he is playing a low B). That would really thicken up the low end.
Last edited by tagyoureit at Mar 13, 2007,
#14
Quote by Fast_Bear
Ask him what he wants to do.

Probably won't need him though. The typical metal band I hear, the guitars are far thicker than the Bass will ever be. Unless he actually goes beyond the roots you probably won't need him.


And that is why I don't lisen to alot of metal...


that's why you dont listen to metal?


seriously though, i agree. let him come up with his own stuff unless he asks you. it wouldnt be cool if you make him play something
#15
Quote by Fast_Bear
Ask him what he wants to do.

Probably won't need him though. The typical metal band I hear, the guitars are far thicker than the Bass will ever be. Unless he actually goes beyond the roots you probably won't need him.


And that is why I don't lisen to alot of metal...


Thats why as a bass player in a metal band I like to turn the volume up

Just make sure he keeps on top of the beat, the rest should be at his own discretion.
#16
1: Ask him what he wants to do.
2: Ask him if he knows how to do what he wants to do
3a: if he doesn't teach him how and sneak his volume up as he improves
3b: If he does, turn him up untill when playing a power chord in unison, you can hear his tone, not just the bass signature.
4: ?????
5: PROFIT!

I still say about 95% of all metal Bassist suck, and that trends needs to die a quick and painfull death! (Seriously! Is the Bass simply there ONLY to add lower harmonics to the guitar frequency redgrestrys?)
#17
whatever key your playing just get the bassist to jam on that one note.


im kidding but like someone said above harmozing is always a cool thing to do.
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#18
just jam and watch him.. get an idea of what he has to offer..
^_^
#19
Quote by Fast_Bear
1: Ask him what he wants to do.
2: Ask him if he knows how to do what he wants to do
3a: If he doesn't, teach him how and sneak his volume up as he improves.
3b: If he does, turn him up until when playing a power chord in unison, you can hear his tone, not just the bass signature.
4: ?????
5: PROFIT!

I still say about 95% of all metal bassists suck, and that trend needs to die a quick and pain full death! (Seriously! Is the bass there ONLY to add lower harmonics to the guitar frequency registry's?)

+1

If it sounds good do it.
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#20
Try not to limit him to just backing up the low end of the frequency spectrum, unless he really is that bad. That's not fun for anyone. The role of a bass player in most bands is to provide a background with the drums, and that's cool if there's a little musical freedom, but it's boring as anything if it sticks to the root notes. I personally believe bass is it's own integral part of the music that should be kept interesting and progressive. Writing good bass lines can really add depth to your songs, and in a way that a guitar just can't.
#21
Quote by indiecult99
i do lead guitars in a metal band called desecrated. just to get an idea of the line up, we have two guitars, vocals, bass and drums, so its not just one guitar player. but we just found our bass player so when he comes to practice im not really sure what he should technically be playing and where he should be as far as a role goes in the music.

any help would be great. thanks.

First of all I think you are probably in the wrong forum. You'd probably be better off in the bass forum where people know what the bassist does.

Secondly it wouldn't hurt you to listen to how the instruments fit together in any band, metal or other wise. It's hard to be in any band and play well if you don't know how your part fits in with the rest of the band.

I'm a bassist by the way.

Firstly you'll find in most rock music the bassist defines the chord changes, although not always true the first note of a chord change is usually the root note of the chord and usually on the first beat of the bar and played by the bassist.

Secondly the bassist is the link between the rhythm section and the lead instruments. picking up the rhythm of the drums and the chord tones of the guitars. That may be in counterpoint or counter rhythm or more often just playing the bass on the beat and on the root, that's going to vary with each song and the skill of the bassist but even the most complex music has the bass playing simple a lot of the time.

You talk about 'teaching' him so I guess he's pretty much a beginner. If so he'd be well advised to stick to the root and nail the rhythm to start with. The best thing you can do to help him will be to give him chord sheets for your songs and also recordings of what you do if they are originals, preferably played along with a metronome or drum machine.

Good luck.
Last edited by Phil Starr at Feb 18, 2016,
#23
Quote by Phil Starr
First of all I think you are probably in the wrong forum. You'd probably be better off in the bass forum where people know what the bassist does.

Secondly it wouldn't hurt you to listen to how the instruments fit together in any band, metal or other wise. It's hard to be in any band and play well if you don't know how your part fits in with the rest of the band.

I'm a bassist by the way.

Firstly you'll find in most rock music the bassist defines the chord changes, although not always true the first note of a chord change is usually the root note of the chord and usually on the first beat of the bar and played by the bassist.

Secondly the bassist is the link between the rhythm section and the lead instruments. picking up the rhythm of the drums and the chord tones of the guitars. That may be in counterpoint or counter rhythm or more often just playing the bass on the beat and on the root, that's going to vary with each song and the skill of the bassist but even the most complex music has the bass playing simple a lot of the time.

You talk about 'teaching' him so I guess he's pretty much a beginner. If so he'd be well advised to stick to the root and nail the rhythm to start with. The best thing you can do to help him will be to give him chord sheets for your songs and also recordings of what you do if they are originals, preferably played along with a metronome or drum machine.

Good luck.


Why are you replying to a thread from 5 months before your join date... in 2007?
#24
Lol, WTF is this thread? Horrible advice...


And yeah, why bump such an old thread?
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#25
Quote by The4thHorsemen
Why are you replying to a thread from 5 months before your join date... in 2007?

That'll be because I didn't notice the date