#2
Depends on what the audience is coming from and what they like. I personally would enjoy a slow one, but a fast one would be cool, as long as its not shredding or something like that. My opinion.
#3
Start slow, and build. They react to speed much more if it isn't a constant. Perhaps quote a famous melody in your solo.

I'm sure someone will come and expand on that if you didn't understand. It seems to always happen
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#4
I agree wiht nightwind


Start of with some slow melody thing


then slowly speed up

until ure into some crazed speedy thing

then maybe slow back down again


up to you really


but contrasts work well
#5
+1 for building up. Nothing like a slow suspenseful build-up and a short burst of speed in the right place.

A good example of this is Wendell's Place by Chris Poland
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Mar 11, 2007,
#6
I prefer to start off slow like in a major scale the start to get faster then go into that scales minor scale and then get fast(like shredding)
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#7
Yeah it really depends on the audience and what they like personally. I imagine that a fan of metal would rather something fairly quick paced than some slow emotional melodic playing (not that playing quickly can be emotional or melodic, they can).

I personally like slower more melodic solos and can't stand fast solos (unless they are part of a (long) blues solo). That is not to say other will not enjoy a solo.

I wouldn't write a solo saying to yourself 'Will the audience like this?' - I would aim to write a solo that I personally like. However, if you do want to write a crowd pleasing solo look at some solos in popular songs (Smells Like Teen Spirit, Sweet Child 'O Mine, Wake Me Up When September Ends, Can't Buy me Love, etc.).

Those are just a few examples that I could think of on the spot, but there a tonnes more. Also, a song doesn't need to have a solo to please a crowd
#10
Both. A good emotional feely first bit, but when the climax comes, let off with an emotional release. Nice and fast.
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#11
Well, are you playing a proper concert, or more of a talent show type dealy? If it's a talent show, do some fast stuff. People at talent shows are going to assume you have some technical proficiency with the instrument, because to them, that's what shows talent.
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#12
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Well, are you playing a proper concert, or more of a talent show type dealy? If it's a talent show, do some fast stuff. People at talent shows are going to assume you have some technical proficiency with the instrument, because to them, that's what shows talent.

you're right, it's really too bad that most people that don't play guitar think talent=technicality rather than musicianship. oh well.

and yeah you should go with what sounds good in the context of the song, but a solo that builds up some tension and then releases it is always satisfying.
#13
Fast and soothing.

Obviously they aren't mutually exclusive. A solo doesn't to be slow to be emotional.
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#14
well its variety night. I want to give em all i can. I want to just rock the place. people will see me up there and be like why is ryan roach up there. Then ill start busting some funky shit that will be extravagant. Nobody but a few of my good friends have heard me. i just want to be heard. So I think a song with tons of emotion will do. I just dont know about a solo. if i play too fast people will be like SHOWOFF. if i play too slow people will think i suck. The ideal solo for the song would be very soothing and very melodic. so iunno i got awhile before it comes to think about it. theres a pep rally talent show but im not doing anythign for that because im saviing it for the variety night.
#16
I think you should serve up both in one. This little video Is a great example of how you can be melodic and play fast.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsRatZykj8M
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#17
dude thats exactly how im going to do it. That solo is so good. very soothing and exciting.
#19
I once had a drummer friend that said,
Sometimes, not playing is as moving as playing.

That is to say, that the absence of a note can really be very ideal. Not every bar has to be full.
#20
it depends on the song. some songs may call for a faster solo and some for slow. some people like fast solos but imo they get boring when thats all that the player does. so mix it up and use your instincts to know where speed is needed. but sometimes, i nice solo that sounds like someone singing will do the trick and you dont need any fast parts.