#1
I know this has been asked before but it seems everytime someone ask they get some weird answer not in english (atleast I cant understand it). I got my technique locked and perfected but I cant make sounds I wanna make. I learn scales on whole note but I don't know how to apply them to my writing I just want someone to explain what I play the scales and write with them like what chords I can play them with and why with in depth without complicated language. I am also wanting to write classical so a step by step sort of thing that I can understand would be amazing.

Thanks in advance
#2
depends on the genre. for light stuff including a lot of classical music, the major scale is used. the most common chord pattern for this is the 1, 4, 5 progresion. These are chords based on the first, fourth, and fifth note of the scale for whatever key you are in. If you don't want to sound like you don't know anything, however. You need to play with different chord formations other than just major. You have to learn the shapes of augmented chords, 7th, 7add9, and so on. Some chords will sound light, some heavy. For darker music, use the minor, harmonic minor, and minor pentatonic scales. These you should mainly use minor and diminished chords to write melodies over. It really takes a lot of guess and check. There is no specific formula for writing music. Play around with your scales and progressions. Also, it is very helpful to record progressions then play melodies over them.
#3
Quote by thrash64
depends on the genre. for light stuff including a lot of classical music, the major scale is used. the most common chord pattern for this is the 1, 4, 5 progresion. These are chords based on the first, fourth, and fifth note of the scale for whatever key you are in. If you don't want to sound like you don't know anything, however. You need to play with different chord formations other than just major. You have to learn the shapes of augmented chords, 7th, 7add9, and so on. Some chords will sound light, some heavy. For darker music, use the minor, harmonic minor, and minor pentatonic scales. These you should mainly use minor and diminished chords to write melodies over. It really takes a lot of guess and check. There is no specific formula for writing music. Play around with your scales and progressions. Also, it is very helpful to record progressions then play melodies over them.



Ok I am starting to catch on, so lets say the 1st note is C 4th is A 5th is B I can play a C chord A chord and B chord? Ok were can I learn those chords and how do I apply those and know what key they are in?
#4
ok... a simple way to get goin is..:

say ur strumin away in the key of C major, (any of the chords):

Cmaj, Dm, Em, Fmaj, Gmaj, Am, Bdim

you could play the C major scale over all of those chords and it would sound right.

you get whats chords are in a certain scale like so:

1st = the scale your playing in - major chord
2nd = a tone up (2 frets) from last - minor chord
3rd = a tone up (2 frets) from last - minor chord
4th = a semi-tone up (1 fret) from last - major chord
5th = a tone up (2 frets) from last - major chord
6th = a tone up (2 frets) from last - minor chord
7th = a tone up (2 frets) form last - diminised chord

brief but i hoped i helped a bit

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#5
Quote by POTFORTY2
Ok I am starting to catch on, so lets say the 1st note is C 4th is A 5th is B I can play a C chord A chord and B chord? Ok were can I learn those chords and how do I apply those and know what key they are in?

He means I-IV-V (1,4,5) within the scale. So if you are writing in C major, the I-IV-V notes would be C, F, and G. Now, I don't know what you know about chord formation, but in C major, if you built chords off of these notes, they are major chords. So the I-IV-V progression in C major is C major - F major - G major, which is very common.
#6
How do you know what chords are in the key of C major? Nevermind I figured it out lol I suck at theory...
Last edited by POTFORTY2 at Mar 11, 2007,
#8
Quote by thrash64
You have to learn the shapes of augmented chords, 7th, 7add9, and so on.
That's a 9th chord you know?
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

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