#1
I'm learing to play SRV's Couldn't Stand the Weather. I have the tab book. The key signature shows 1 flat (f#) which would make the key G or E minor correct? However there is a note on the page that says "Key signature indicates D Mixolydian" and the solo apears to be around the D blues scale. Anyway, it doesn't fit the D mixolydian scale. Can someone tell me how this is D mixolydian?
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#2
Do you mean 1 sharp? It fits D mixolydian because D mixolydian is the 5th mode of G major.

D Mixo: D E F# G A B C
(1 2 3 4 5 6 b7)

G major: G A B C D E F#

Annnnd, it is in the key of D, I'm assuming, but with one sharp. He may have a lot of passing tones.
DANNY

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#3
well most of the solo is in D minor pentatonic or blues scale. when the chords change though it goes into the major or just B minor.
#4
Quote by bluesrocker101
Do you mean 1 sharp? It fits D mixolydian because D mixolydian is the 5th mode of G major.

D Mixo: D E F# G A B C
(1 2 3 4 5 6 b7)

G major: G A B C D E F#

Annnnd, it is in the key of D, I'm assuming, but with one sharp. He may have a lot of passing tones.


Yes I ment sharp, sorry.

Thanks for the explanation guys, but wouldn't the key be F major then?
Guitars
2-Fender USA strats
2-San Dimas Charvels
Gibson Les Paul w/EMGs
Ibanez RG760
Ibanez Destroyer
Amps
Fender Twin Reverb RI
Fender Vibroverb Reissue
Lee Jackson XLS-1000
Marshall JCM900 Dual Rev
Marshall JCM900 SLX
Last edited by 6SecondFlatline at Mar 11, 2007,
#5
Key signatures are sometimes misleading if you're a rock or blues guitarist who plays by ear. For one thing, the line between major and minor is sometimes blurry (in blues and rock). Also, songs sometimes go in and out of different tonal centers or keys, but a key signature may give you the (false) impression that the song is all in one key or tonal center.

This song is a good example of both of the above. The main riff and verse are in D, but is it major or minor? The tell-tale note would be the third degree of the scale, is it F or F#?

The riff alternates back and forth between an F note and an F# note.

The overdubbed guitar doing that double-stop and triple-stop rhythm riffing uses that real common hammer-on from minor to major:

-12-10----10---
-12-10----10h11
-------12-10---


The verse has an underlying Dm7 feel. But a D7#9 (the "Hendrix" chord) might sound appropriate too. (I'm not sure exactly what chord he's playing there, would be interesting to watch video of him to see how he's fingering it)

Finally, when he solos over that D chord (whatever it is) in the middle part of the song, he's mostly using D minor pentatonic.

So its not real clear.

But what about the intro chords, which are repeated in the "chorus" (Bm A G F#). If the song was in the key of Dm, you wouldn't expect a Bm. If the song was in the key of D major, yes, but not D minor.

Furthermore, that whole chord sequence feels like its a tonal shift to Bm because the F# is major, not minor. I know, Bm and D major share the same key signature. But having that F# be major gives it a dominant (V) sound, kinda makes Bm the tonal center.

Sometimes the best thing you can do is try and figure out the scale the guitar player is using over the chord progression. Gives you a hint as to what he's "thinking", how he's viewing it. In the middle of the song, he's playing Bm pentatonic riffs over that chord sequence (except for the very last G chord, when he switches to G minor pentatonic).

One more thing of interest: guitarists usually either "play off the key" or "play off the chord". The intro chords are a good example of the latter. Instead of sticking mostly to Bm (the tonal center, or "key") scale, like he does in the middle solo, in the intro, he plays off each chord. So over the Bm he does Bm penta riffing, over the A he's using Am penta, G is Gm penta.