#1
I have a question about this video. I've seen a lot of people link to it as answer to a lot of "soloing" questions on the forums, so I decided to take a peek. So far, it seems like it's going to be very helpful, I like the sound of the notes he uses. My question is, what like scale is he playing? Because he says "Here comes the D chord" and says he's going to play like a D chord but goes way up the neck into some kind of scale/form that doesn't look familiar to me, so it's hard to do this for me. Is he playing a different D chord formation up the neck or what? If he is, how do I know how to do this then? I want to be able to solo over a simple 3-chord progression like he is in the video. I just don't know what he's doing...
I love music. That is all...
#2
He's arpeggiating; playing the notes of the chords separately. So, like during the measures where a D chord is playing, he's playing the notes D, A, and F# in different orders and pitches. This is called using "chord tones" to solo. It's basically the "safe" way to solo, because it's pretty much guaranteed to sound good.
Quote by dudetheman
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Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#3
Okay, so is there any easier way to do that than to have to learn every note on the fretboard? I don't want to know each string all like 22 frets which note they are to play the 3 notes of a chord......
I love music. That is all...
#4
No. You should learn notes, intervals, and basic chord construction. It's not hard, just practice it.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#5
Um, if by notes you mean the order of notes and all of them, I do know all the notes and their order, I know that intervals are like half step and whole step, 1 fret and 2, but not really chord construction.....could u please explain or gimme a link for what I need to learn to make this easier to solo? Thanks...
I love music. That is all...
#6
What I meant by notes was you need to be able to locate notes all over the fretboard. If I said "play me the lower B on the high e string," you should be able to snap that note out like nothing.

There's more to intervals than 1 fret and 2 frets. Intervals are the distance between notes, whether it's unison, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and octave. With intervals, you construct scales and chords.

Read these:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/basic_chord_theory.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/soloing/soloing_with_minimal_theory_knowledge.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/the_circle_of_fifths_music_theory_for_dummies.html

Learn them. Love them.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#7
Learn all of the notes on the fretboard. Learn all of the notes on the fretboard. Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.Learn all of the notes on the fretboard. Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.Learn all of the notes on the fretboard.



There are only 12 notes per string, then they repeat. Do this excersize:

Start with the low E, and for 10 minutes at the beginning of practise and 10 at the end, just go up and down it naming the notes , jumping around, or just ascending/descending one fret at a time. Do this everyday. After a week, go to the A string and do it, while reviewing your E string notes too. Every week, go to a new string. After 5 weeks, you will know the notes extremely well, for the rest of your life.

If you ever want to improvise, this is essential. It is VERY VERY worth it.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#8
He's simply playing the notes in the chord. Yes, it's arpegiating. You could consider the arpeggio part of any number of scales, but I think of it as an arpeggio, somewhat removed from a scale.

That isn't to say that arpeggios aren;t part of scales, but when I play arpeggios, I think, "not it's time for a D major arpeggio," not, "now I'm going to play the first, third, and fifth degrees of a D major scale!"

Anyway, if you're wondering why it sounds good but it so simple, just remember that KISS is incredible important.

KISS=Keep It Simple, Stupid!