#3
so just a basic 5th chord e.g G5 and then flatten the fifth? am also a bit lost when it comes to modes but am sure i'll find out the phygrian (sp?) any other suggestions would be helpful
#4
No no, Say your playing in A minor, the normal pattern is a,b,c,d,e,f,g
With the Flattended fifth it would be a,b,c,d,Eb,f,g
#5
tune your guitar down anywhere between 1 and 2 whole steps, play power chords exclusively, preferably with only 2 notes.

use alot of trills and bends. play 2 really similar solos on top of each other, sync em up and have em go wildly different then sync em up.

tis the Iommi way
#7
Quote by freedoms_stain
tune your guitar down anywhere between 1 and 2 whole steps, play power chords exclusively, preferably with only 2 notes.

use alot of trills and bends. play 2 really similar solos on top of each other, sync em up and have em go wildly different then sync em up.

tis the Iommi way


great, thanx a lot keep it nice nd simple
#8
Well in terms of chords use lots of power chords (already been said), and added in little extra things at the end of each phrase of riff (possibly). Master hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides, and bends as they will all be extremeley important while soloing.

Also, aim to create something that is somewhat catchy and memorable...
#10
Overall, focus on heaviness, groove, and total feel than technicality or brutality. Songs by bands like that are all about just being crushing instead of like, 12 NPS trem-picking riffs.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.