#1
I've been playing around with an EQ and I noticed that there's a horribly honky, farty sound that reminds me of humming with my nose plugged, and it's centred around 160Hz on the EQ curve. I do know that that's prime real estate. If I cut it, while boosting the bass and boosting the shit out of the high mids and treble (like I always do), will I still have a thick-but-clear tone? Or will the ass fall out of my signal?
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#2
You'll cut through quite well still, but your overall tone in the mix will lose presence. Depending on the song that can be a desirable thing, though. I generally cut my low mids a tad (10 o'clock or so on my amp dial) and leave everything else flat when playing my P-bass to get that slightly hollow, grinding-midrange tone.
Quote by MetalUpTheAss
Sounds to me like an excuse.

"Honey, I've got to buy a new bass! This diamond is made of a dead guy! I made him a promise!"


Most Bitter/Cynical member of the Bass Militia. PM DinkyDaisy to join.
#3
I know what you mean - I had a similar honking issue on my old amp. I'd suggest a change of the capacitor on that tone control to shift the frequency slightly, enough to lose the honk where the circuit is too resonant at that frequency but not so as to lose the punch.
#4
Hmm... I've always wanted that Entwistle tone from the Kids Are Alright (Baba and Won't Get Fooled Again). His tone was nice and clear and didn't sound like some of his speakers were in another room (but I know he had so much gear, probably half of it was). I just don't know how to get a thick, clear tone without having that farty mud clouding everything up.

And to smb: I have a parametric EQ, meaning I can select between 150Hz-1.5kHz on one knob and can select 800Hz to 4kHz on another. I can dial in that exact frequency, but I'm worried that my sound will be stringy and thin.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#5
Ok then - how about getting an EQ pedal and cutting it at whichever is closest to 160Hz, boosting the frequencies either side of it and keeping the EQ as you like it on your amp? It wouldn't be money wasted, since you're bound to need an EQ pedal at some point and it would enable cutting a much smaller band of frequencies than the Eq on your amp.
#6
That's a good idea... I think I can pull the reverse effect off my cutting at exactly 160Hz on my parametric EQ and then compensating on my bass' EQ.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#7
i recomend putting the 10band EQ pedal in youre effects loop so it is like adding the 10 band EQ to youre amp's features. also it will round out the sound a little bit better in the effects loops imo
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#8
If this comes through ok you will see that 160Hz is between 7th & 8th (Eb/E) fret G string which is not usualy a honking sound as you put, this is normaly around 600-800 hz

Frequencies for equal-tempered scale

This table created using A4 = 440 Hz
Speed of sound = 345 m/s = 1130 ft/s = 770 miles/hr

("Middle C" is C4 )

*Note* Frequency (Hz) Wavelength (cm) *Note* Frequency (Hz) Wavelength (cm)
C0 16.35 2100 D4 293.66 117
C#0/Db0 17.32 1990 D#4/Eb4 311.13 111
D0 18.35 1870 E4 329.63 105
D#0/Eb0 19.45 1770 F4 349.23 98.8
E0 20.6 1670 F#4/Gb4 369.99 93.2
F0 21.83 1580 G4 392 88
F#0/Gb0 23.12 1490 G#4/Ab4 415.3 83.1
G0 24.5 1400 A4 440 78.4
G#0/Ab0 25.96 1320 A#4/Bb4 466.16 74
A0 27.5 1250 B4 493.88 69.9
A#0/Bb0 29.14 1180 C5 523.25 65.9
B0 30.87 1110 C#5/Db5 554.37 62.2
C1 32.7 1050 D5 587.33 58.7
C#1/Db1 34.65 996 D#5/Eb5 622.25 55.4
D1 36.71 940 E5 659.26 52.3
D#1/Eb1 38.89 887 F5 698.46 49.4
E1 41.2 837 F#5/Gb5 739.99 46.6
F1 43.65 790 G5 783.99 44
F#1/Gb1 46.25 746 G#5/Ab5 830.61 41.5
G1 49 704 A5 880 39.2
G#1/Ab1 51.91 665 A#5/Bb5 932.33 37
A1 55 627 B5 987.77 34.9
A#1/Bb1 58.27 592 C6 1046.5 33
B1 61.74 559 C#6/Db6 1108.73 31.1
C2 65.41 527 D6 1174.66 29.4
C#2/Db2 69.3 498 D#6/Eb6 1244.51 27.7
D2 73.42 470 E6 1318.51 26.2
D#2/Eb2 77.78 444 F6 1396.91 24.7
E2 82.41 419 F#6/Gb6 1479.98 23.3
F2 87.31 395 G6 1567.98 22
F#2/Gb2 92.5 373 G#6/Ab6 1661.22 20.8
G2 98 352 A6 1760 19.6
G#2/Ab2 103.83 332 A#6/Bb6 1864.66 18.5
A2 110 314 B6 1975.53 17.5
A#2/Bb2 116.54 296 C7 2093 16.5
B2 123.47 279 C#7/Db7 2217.46 15.6
C3 130.81 264 D7 2349.32 14.7
C#3/Db3 138.59 249 D#7/Eb7 2489.02 13.9
D3 146.83 235 E7 2637.02 13.1
D#3/Eb3 155.56 222 F7 2793.83 12.3
E3 164.81 209 F#7/Gb7 2959.96 11.7
F3 174.61 198 G7 3135.96 11
F#3/Gb3 185 186 G#7/Ab7 3322.44 10.4
G3 196 176 A7 3520 9.8
G#3/Ab3 207.65 166 A#7/Bb7 3729.31 9.3
A3 220 157 B7 3951.07 8.7
A#3/Bb3 233.08 148 C8 4186.01 8.2
B3 246.94 140 C#8/Db8 4434.92 7.8
C4 261.63 132 D8 4698.64 7.3
C#4/Db4 277.18 124 D#8/Eb8 4978.03 6.9



















































(To convert lengths in cm to inches, divide by 2.54)




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