#1
what would a seven diminished first inversion look like in the key of c major? would it just be bdf or would it have to be B - D flat - F Flat? i have a good idea but i wanna make it sure.
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#3
First inversion puts D in the bass, so your chord has to stack over the D with B,F, and A being the rest of the notes. Diminished 7 chords are usually found in first inversion 90% of the time anyway.
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#4
Also, if you remember that in any key, the 7 chord built on the seventh scale degree is diminished, just keep all the notes in the key and build your chord. C Major has no sharps or flats so keep all your notes unaltered, unless you want a fully diminished 7 chord in which case all your intervals have to be minor thirds, so you would need an Ab instead of A.
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#5
I think he's referring to the diminished triad built on the seventh degree of C major.

The notes in the triad would be B, D, and F. To have it in first inversion would mean that the D would be the lowest note, with the F the next highest, and B the highest.
#6
but wouldn't a regular 7th chord in the key of c also just be BDF? if im not lowering the notes (you said diminished 7th is also BDF) how are they becoming diminished?
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#7
Quote by weezer ate cake
but wouldn't a regular 7th chord in the key of c also just be BDF? if im not lowering the notes (you said diminished 7th is also BDF) how are they becoming diminished?
The seventh chord in C major is B diminished, not B major.

A B diminished 7 is B D F A. B diminished is B D A. The A note is the seventh and is not played in a B diminished chord.
#8
Quote by musicology
First inversion puts D in the bass, so your chord has to stack over the D with B,F, and A being the rest of the notes. Diminished 7 chords are usually found in first inversion 90% of the time anyway.


Diminished triads built on the 7th degree are generally in first inversion. Diminished 7ths (as in having a minor or diminished seventh) don't have to be in an inversion. Particularly the fully diminished: out of context, you wouldn't even know what inversion it's in anyway.

I forget exactly why this is, but I guess having the seventh makes the tritone of the diminished fifth against the bass more bearable.
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#9
Quote by titopuente
I think he's referring to the diminished triad built on the seventh degree of C major.

The notes in the triad would be B, D, and F. To have it in first inversion would mean that the D would be the lowest note, with the F the next highest, and B the highest.


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#10
I think I need to explain a little more to the TC.

Say you're looking at the key of C major; this key contains the notes C-D-E-F-G-A-B. When someone says to build a chord from a certain scale degree of C major, you will be using only notes from that key(usually). For example, "Build a triad from the seventh degree of C major." Take a look at the available notes, and see that the seventh degree is B. The way that you build triads is to stack thirds on top of each other. (Thirds refers to the fact that notes are either a major third(2 whole tones) or a minor third(1 and a half tones) apart). The way that this is done is to start on the note that you're building your chord from, skip a note, then include the next note, skip a note, then include the next note after that. If you were building a triad from B in the key of C major, you would start with B, skip C, include D, skip E, then include F. This gives you three notes which comprise a triad build built from B. Now take a look at the intervals between the notes B, D, and F. The distance from B to D is 3 semitones, or a minor third. The distance from D to F is a minor third(3 semitones). The distance from B to F is a diminished fifth/tritone/3 tones.

There are four different types of triads that can be built from stacking thirds. They are:

Major: There is a major third between the first and second note in the triad, and a minor third between the second and third note of the triad. The distance betweeen the first and third notes is a perfect fifth (3 and a half tones or 7 semitones). The formula for this type of triad is: (1-3-5).

Minor: There is a minor third between the first and second note, and a major third between the second and third note. There is a perfect fifth between the first and third notes. The formula for a minor triad is: (1-b3-5)

Diminished: There is a minor third between the first and second note, and a minor third between the second and third note. There is a diminished fifth between the first and third notes. The formula for a diminished triad is: (1-b3-b5).

Augmented: There is a major third between the first and second notes, and a major third between the second and third notes. There is an augmented fifth between the first and third notes. The formula for an augmented triad is: (1-3-#5).

If we were to take a look at the triad built from B above, we would see that it fits the profile of a diminished triad.

To expand upon this, we can analyze triads built from every scale degree. Using the same procedure as above, let's start with C, skip D, include E, skip F, and include G. This gives us C-E-G. The distance between C and E is a major third. The distance between C and G is a perfect fifth. This is a major triad.

To keep this to reasonable length, I'll skip the procedure and give you the rest of the triads:

C: C-E-G (major)
D: D-F-A (minor)
E: E-G-B (minor)
F: F-A-C (major)
G: G-B-D (major)
A: A-C-E (minor)
B: B-D-F (diminished)

I would recommend looking at each of the triads and seeing why they are named as they are, and having the intervals between most or all of the notes (even sharps and flats) memorized. Another important thing is that the quality of the triads built from each scale degree translates to every other major key. For example the key of G contains the notes (G-A-B-C-D-E-F#). The triads built from this key are G major(G-B-D), A minor(A-C-E), B minor(B-D-F#), C major(C-E-G), D major(D-F#-A), E minor(E-G-B), and F# diminished(F#-A-C). Notice that the first degree always has a major triad, second is minor, third is minor, fourth is major, fifth is major, sixth is minor, and seventh is diminished. As long as you don't start borrowing chords from other keys, this structure never changes. Also, realize that when building diatonic triads (those using only notes from within a certain key), you're not going to sharp or flat any of the notes; the intervals between the notes are just as they are. We just give names to the different chords based on those intervals.
#11
diminished chords are found in first inversion for proper voice leading in SATB writing.
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