#1
heyloo
ive been playing fretless a few weeks now, my intonation is improving, and i know itll take ages before its pretty good. but i wondered if anyone could suggest any practise exercises to make intonation more accurate?

many thanks, matt
i need to get a better signature.
#2
You could possibly try singing as well, to train your ear.

http://www.musictheory.net/

That has ear trainers for scales, chords, and intervals. The intervals especially might help you.
"You can practice to attain knowledge, but you can't practice to attain wisdom." - Herbie Hancock
#3
Due to broken strings, I've been losing practice on my fretless a lot lately. I actually started playing the thing today and it was almost painful when I tried to play a rather simple song and it came out flat and out of tune. The way I plan on working on that is simply by practicing some scales for a while and then working out the basslines until I feel comfortable enough.
#4
I would do an ear warm up before I played my fretless. I would play an open string (let's take E for example). Then, I would find all the other octaves of that note on other strings. For example, the 7th and 19th fret of the A, the 9th and perhaps 21st fret of the G, and the 2nd and 14th fret of the D. Play the open string and the octave note at the same time. Keep playing them till they are ALL in tune. After a few minutes, you should be able to jump from fret to fret in E, playing in tune. Then, I play notes that are in the same key of E (like 11th fret of the A, etc) and do the same thing. Finally, I start playing scales that involve the octave and the other notes in that key. Once you do that (and you may want to for other strings), you'll be surprised how accurate your playing is.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#5
what i did when i started playin double bass was just find where each fret would be using a tuner and mark it with a pencil and just kinda play it off there til your ear improves and it becomes second nature
#6
There are a couple great exercises I learn recently that you can do.

First off, start with your index finger on the 7th fret D String, and your middle finger on the 8th fret D string (A and A#). Now place your ring and pinky on the 9th and 10th frets of the G String.

Now lift your middle finger and play the 7th fret. Place your middle finger back down and play the 8th fret. DO NOT MOVE YOUR RING AND PINKY FINGERS OFF THE FINGERBOARD. Repeat until you feel comforatable (at 60bpm).

Once your comfortable there switch so you have your index and ring fingers on the D String (7th and 9th) and your Middle and pinky on the G. Repeat the process.

Keep doing this pattern (next would be index and pinky [7th and 10th] then it would go middle to ring [8th to 9th] middle to pinky [8th to 10th] ring to pinky [9th to 10th] )

Once you get to your pinky finger, reverse the entire process. REMEMBER TO HOLD YOUR FINGERS ON THE G STRING DOWN. This exercise is pointless without it.

G|------------------
D|-7-8-7-8-7-8-7-8-
A|------------------
E|------------------


www.meteronomeonline.com


I'll edit this around 2:30, I've got class right now, and I have a bunch more exercises you can do.
#8
Quote by Fast_Bear
Do you have a fretted? Play that. Play as close to the frets as possable untill whatever you are playing becomes second nature and you can do it blindfolded. Now play it on your fretless.


it is a good idea. unfortunately my fretted has a rather smaller neck than the traditional bass (not sure why, it was a 'beginners' bass or something, for people with short arms?) so might not work as well.
i need to get a better signature.
#9
i cheated and baught one with fret lines.
Fender '51 Precision Bass
Hofner Verythin LTD Edition Guitar in Walnut w/ Bigsby
Engelhardt ES9 Upright Bass
1968 Trayner YBA 1A MK II Amp
w/ 6x10 cabinet

www.iaminlimbo.com
#10
^GET THE HELL OUT OF HERE!

Come back on hard dificulty.

Quote by MATTTHEMOP
it is a good idea. unfortunately my fretted has a rather smaller neck than the traditional bass (not sure why, it was a 'beginners' bass or something, for people with short arms?) so might not work as well.


Does the Bass have any markers on it at all?
#11
I have more of a problem playing with fretlines than I do with a blank fingerboard. When I look at all those lines without the proper dots on the fingerboard, I go cross eyed. For me, it's either blank, it it's Jaco/American Deluxe Fender style.

But, FWIW, I choke up from the 9th to the 15th fret on an unlined fretless. I can't see exactly what I'm doing.

MATTTHEHOP, I think you have a short-scale bass. Does it happen to be an Epiphone EB-0 SG-style bass?
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#12
Quote by Fast_Bear
^GET THE HELL OUT OF HERE!

Come back on hard dificulty.


Does the Bass have any markers on it at all?



the correct term is GTFO......lol
Fender '51 Precision Bass
Hofner Verythin LTD Edition Guitar in Walnut w/ Bigsby
Engelhardt ES9 Upright Bass
1968 Trayner YBA 1A MK II Amp
w/ 6x10 cabinet

www.iaminlimbo.com
#13
the most important thing when playing double bass (which is more or less like a big fretless really) is hand position-u HAVE to keep ur fingers spaced to where the notes are, or u haven't a chance

the only real way to work on this is to play really slowly, always checking that your hand is nicely spaced, thumb about opposite your 2nd finger, in the middle of the neck.

also make sure your 1st finger is pointing straight, not curling down the neck, or it'll alwyas be sharp.

but the bottom line is pratice the hand positions, it kinda sucks, but its the best way