#1
Hey UG,
Is there anybody out there that could help with my triplet technique...If you need an example refer to Iced Earth stuff like Travel In Stygian (4:30 part especially). I can pull of triplets like Iron Maiden's The Trooper with ease but I'm pretty sure I have the wrong technique cause there's no way I'm gonna get to Travel In Stygian speed like this cause it hurts after a while, and it feels like I'm elbow picking at this speed, though not over-exaggerated...I would appreciate help especially with the thumb picking technique I seem to see often.
Thanks!
#2
Well if you are elbow picking and don't want to, just take that part of the song, use a metronome and slow it down alot, and practice using just your hand to alternate pick, then bring it up to speed. Yea, it will hurt your hand, but you'll get use to it and it won't after a while.
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#3
Use the search feature, and I'm not being an ass. Search under "gallop" or something to that effect.
#4
First off there's a difference between a gallop pattern and triplets.

A gallop is an 8th note, followed by two 16ths.
A triplet is three notes played in the space of one.

A gallop goes: duh, da da duh, da da duh, da da duh, da da duh...
A triplet goes: Duh duh duh-duh duh duh-duh duh duh-duh duh duh...
                                ^
One of these groups of three "duh's" take place in the time it would take to play one quarter note. 


Any questions?
#5
Triplets equals two notes.

for example

16th-16th-8th = 8th-8th
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#6
Wrong^
Guys, triplets are not. 16th-16th-8th.
Triplets are consecutive(spelling). Theres the same ammount of space in between each note.
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#7
Quote by OldRocker
Triplets equals two notes.

for example

16th-16th-8th = 8th-8th

"16th-16th-8th" is not a triplet pattern. Triplets, eighth note triplets anyway, are three notes of equal length played in the span of one quarter note.
#9
Quote by Wonthefu
Let's put it this way: Three 8th triplets are played in the same amount of time as one normal 8th.

That would be 16th triplets. Three 8th triplets are played in the same amount of time as a normal quarter note.

Your sound clip played 8th-16th-16th as the "gallop" rhythm btw.
#10
Quote by hiphopopotamus
That would be 16th triplets. Three 8th triplets are played in the same amount of time as a normal quarter note.

Your sound clip played 8th-16th-16th as the "gallop" rhythm btw.


I accidentally said "gallops are 16th-16th-8th." Whoops.

Hmm, guess I was wrong about the naming of the triplets. Thanks for the correction.
#11
Quote by Wonthefu
No, gallops are 16th-16th-8th.

Let's put it this way: Three 8th triplets are played in the same amount of time as one normal 8th.

Sound clip demonstrating point.


Am I the only one who finds that sound clip really catchy?
#12
Quote by Wonthefu
No, gallops are 16th-16th-8th.

Let's put it this way: Three 8th triplets are played in the same amount of time as one normal 8th.

Sound clip demonstrating point.

Thats what I said dude.
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#13
A triplet is three notes to the beat.

A gallop, which is what you are talking about, is an 8th note followed by two 16th notes. To play them, you have to have very good control over your right hand. Start off very slowly, and make sure your arm is relaxed as possible.
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#15
For any gallop riff, it's mandatory that you use up & down strokes. Trying to play riffs like that at high speeds is impossible with only downstrokes o_o

The easiest way to get better at them is to start slow, & build your way up to the speed you want. Trying to start off with a song like Iced Earth's "Travel In Stygian" or Kreator's "Phobia", or even Metallica's "Battery" is not really a wise idea if you cannot keep up with a song like Iron Maiden's "The Trooper" (not talking about the whole song here, just the gallop parts)


Think of the pick attack on the strings. You want a specific note to ring out, depending on if you want Iron Maiden type gallops, or Iced Earth type gallops.

For Iron Maiden type gallops, the accent note will fall on the 3rd pick attack. If done correctly, the last note in the gallop will be the one that falls on the beat in the song.

example: (btw, PD = picking direction, d = down, u = up)


PD: d dud dud dud dud
guitar:1 123 123 123 123
drum: * * * * *


Likewise, for Iced Earth type gallops, the accent note will fall on the 1st pick attack. When done correctly, the first note in the gallop will be the one that falls on the beat in the song.


PD: dud dud dud dud dud
guitar:123 123 123 123 123
drum: * * * * *


It takes a little getting used to, but it's a lot of fun when you get it down


Hope this helps!!

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