#1
Hey, I've been playing guitar for 3 years now and although I'll definitely keep it my main instrument, I've been thinking I might want to start picking up another. So I ask of you, how hard is the transition from guitar to say... an orchestra instrument? Like cello, or double bass. I'm mainly wondering about bowing.
#2
I haven't tried, but honestly it shouldn't be too much harder. Using a bow is just a different way of making the string vibrate, and you should be able to adapt to that quickly.

The only thing I can see which might be a problem, is proper intonation and fingering techniques, as they lack frets. I wouldn't view that as a problem actually, think of it as a learning experience, it'll greatly enhance your ear.
#4
I'm not worried about the fretless-ness too much, more so about how hard it seems to try to bow the two middle strings without hitting the outer ones.
#5
I believe you can get Double Bass instruments which have marks on the neck to indicate the frets, but no fret wire. This would be good for learning I suppose... I have a friend who played the violin, who used to mark the neck with a soft, dry chalk to mark the notes.

And as for the bow thing, the strings are at different heights (Well, the bridge is curved, so the strings are at equal heights, if you know what I mean) so I imagine using a bow wouldn't be too difficult either.
#6
Since playing guitar I've tried various other instruments and it doesn't really make it easier you just feel as though you should be doing better because you are an accomplished guitarist and then just give up, lol.

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#8
Quote by ridder
if you can read music - sweet as...


Yea I can read music. But sweet as what? Lol, I sound like a dumbass, but I don't get what you were about to say.
#9
if you're a good guitarist, then you should be good at fretting. thats about 1/3 of the skill in things like violin and cello. If you practise "bowing" and then adapt your fretting skills to that of an orchestral instrument then you should fly.

at the end of the day, almost all songs written for violins or cello's etc are very slow and very easy, thats the biggest downfall of classical music.
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#10
Quote by awesomoshis
Yea I can read music. But sweet as what? Lol, I sound like a dumbass, but I don't get what you were about to say.

"sweet as..." is just like saying "wow thats really sweet"
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#11
Quote by jeowy
at the end of the day, almost all songs written for violins or cello's etc are very slow and very easy, thats the biggest downfall of classical music.


I have to disagree with you there. I've been listening to alot of Schubert lately and he doesn't exactly have outrageously fast songs, but there are definitely some fast parts. I get your point though.
#12
Quote by jeowy

at the end of the day, almost all songs written for violins or cello's etc are very slow and very easy, thats the biggest downfall of classical music.


No.

I've seen some incredibly fast and hard stuff in Classical music that matches any 'shredding' or fast guitar playing.

Watch This

This is even more amazing

I just think that it's wrong to say most music for violins or cellos is slow and easy.
#13
Quote by jeowy

at the end of the day, almost all songs written for violins or cello's etc are very slow and very easy, thats the biggest downfall of classical music.


bullshit
#14
Quote by jeowy
at the end of the day, almost all songs written for violins or cello's etc are very slow and very easy, thats the biggest downfall of classical music.


ummm.....no, classical music can be incredibly technical
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#15
Quote by jeowy
at the end of the day, almost all songs written for violins or cello's etc are very slow and very easy, thats the biggest downfall of classical music..

If that's the case why are so many shredders obsessed with copying classical pieces?

Paganini's caprices anyone?

Congratulations BTW on what could possibly be the most uninformed comment I've seen on UG...consider yourself sigged mate.
Actually called Mark!

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#16
Don't know about cello or whatever, but i walked up to a piano yesterday and banged out a riff I'd been messing with like it was nothing. I've never played a piano before.
#17
The more instruments you are proficient on, the easier it becomes to pick up new ones

I'd suggest learning on an unlined board; lined fretless most guitarists will jusrt put their finger on the line and not do any more, which will lead to poor intonation

If you want to learn double bass or cello I'd suggest a teaher at least at first to teach you positional playing (if you already play some styles of guitar (I'm thinking classical here) you may be familiar with this) and proper bowing technique. A bad grip can fick up your hand, particularly on a double bass because of the strength required

Don't worry about bowing the middle strings; they're arched quite strongly, it isn't a problem.
#18
To Nick, above me:

Thanks for the suggestion. Actually I've only been into classical for a month or two now, so I actually don't know what you mean by positional playing; so if you would explain, that'd be great.
#19
Well, if you know at least some theory on guitar, that'll help you. You'll just have to get the technique and the different tuning down and apply the theory.
"Isn't it amazing anything's accomplished
When the little sensation gets in your way
Not one ambition whisperin' over your shoulder
Isn't it amazing you can do anything " - Gord Downie

From the song " Fireworks"
#20
The idea behind a position is that you have a hand position that will cover a certain range of notes. and each finger has a specific spot in the position for each note within the position. On a fretless instrument, you want to eliminate moving your hand around as much as possible and play from within position.

also, how big are you? you should keep in mind that even 3/4 size uprights (which is likely what you'd be starting on) are really big, heavy, and take a lot of strength to play.
#21
Oh, so THATS positional playing. I do that alot with classical guitar, but I never knew it had a name. I'm not too big. Actually I'm about 5'7 or 5'6.5, but I'm still only 14. Ha, anyway, I don't think I'm gonna do upright any time soon anyway, I was thinking mainly of cello, that's what I'm really interested in picking up (along with trumpet, but thats irrelevant).
#22
trumpet isn't irrelevant, they rule

cellos are tuned in fifths, so might get some weirding happening if you switch back and forth frequently, but it won't be a problem.