#1
I can play any slow to medium solo from You Shook Me All Night Long to Freebird (not a typo), but once speed comes, I just can't do it, for example I can play Freebird solo, I can not play Crazytrain solo because it has 2 fast parts which I just can't do. Is it normal for most people to struggle this much with speed or what?
#2
No. When you pick up your guitar you should already have the amazing technical skill of Randy Rhodes right away with no practice at all.
Quote by Krost
a Ghost possessed my dog and made him buy a 50 cent CD.


Watch it now, watch it!

"I died a little inside when Steve Irwin died...RIP"

Honorary Masshole. PM SOADFanSince'98 to join.
#3
Some people can play really fast, and some slow.

It all depends on you and your style.

You could train yourself to play that fast by taking sections of the fast part and slowing them down, gradually building up speed with each time you play.

But that depends on if you want to take the time. Some of the greatest solos have been slower than some.
#4
Quote by Mcut202
No. When you pick up your guitar you should already have the amazing technical skill of Randy Rhodes right away with no practice at all.


Ive praticed those 2 individual parts from time to time for about 6 months, not constantly till it works tho
#5
From time to time isn't enough, you have to practice constantly, especially to build up shred-like speed.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
not only that, I read somewhere Stairway to Heaven was a beginners solo, but the very first 6 sec of solo somewhat just seems impossible in itself
#7
Quote by shellshock1911
not only that, I read somewhere Stairway to Heaven was a beginners solo, but the very first 6 sec of solo somewhat just seems impossible in itself
it's not that fast/hard actually... Stairway to Heaven is really a beginner's solo...
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

Quote by Resiliance
you show me yours and I'll show you mine!


If you're wondering where I've been gone, click here!
#8
it's all practice... and not just how much you practised those two sections of the solo.

you have to build up your speed in general to be able to apply it to solos.

you can't be slow and expect to get fast enough to play a certain solo by only playing that solo.

so bust out your metronome and do scales, or finger exercises, or both and build up your speed (slowly and cleanly).

-JC
Do You Make These Guitar Playing Mistakes? FREE guitar eBook... instant download at StartRocking.com
#9
Quote by JohnnyCobra
it's all practice... and not just how much you practised those two sections of the solo.

you have to build up your speed in general to be able to apply it to solos.

you can't be slow and expect to get fast enough to play a certain solo by only playing that solo.

so bust out your metronome and do scales, or finger exercises, or both and build up your speed (slowly and cleanly).

-JC


I don't understand metronome, beats, etc, and I have no one to teach me scales, I do my best with online resources and tabs =(
#10
Tab for minor penatonic scale. Play it up and back down, you only play the last note once when turning around. You can also play it backwards and start low and go high.


|-8---5----------------------------------------------------------------
|----------8---5-------------------------------------------------------
|-------------------7---5----------------------------------------------
|----------------------------7---5-------------------------------------
|-------------------------------------7---5----------------------------
|----------------------------------------------8---5-------------------

Standard tuning.

Edit: you can play it anywhere that is keyed in A.
Last edited by Immortal_Hero at Mar 20, 2007,
#11

e----------------------------------------------------
b-------------------------------------------8-10-------
g--------------------------------7-9-10---------------
d----------------5-7----7-9-10-----------------------
a---------5-7-8----------------------------------------
E-5-7-8------------------------------------------------
   A B C  D E F  G A    A  B  C  D  E  F   G A
    W H W  W H W  W      W  H  W  W   H  W  W


This is Am, in your head or even out loud if you dont mind looking crazy, say the names of the notes you are playing. notice the notes on the b string are moved down...
you also must remeber "WHWWHWW", W being Whole step and H being Half step, which is how far apart the notes are in the scale. notice A is a whole step away from B, which means its two frets apart, while B and C are H (half step) and only one apart. remember that, it will be good for later...
and make sure to go all the way up then come back down
Gear:

Gibson SG
Epiphone LP
"Apocalypses Guitar"
70's Silverface Bassman Amp
Russian Bigmuff
Digitech Deathmetal Pedal
Digitech Badmonkey Pedal
Boss Tuner
#12
Quote by Mcut202
No. When you pick up your guitar you should already have the amazing technical skill of Randy Rhodes right away with no practice at all.


It's spelled Rhoads, and don't tell a beginner something like that, it's very disheartening.

All you need is some practice, dude. Take it slow, split it up into sections.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#13
speed will come as long as you devote time to learning the technique. Its normal for most people to struggle with playing really fast (there are some for whom speed comes easily, however). The number of threads concerned with fast playing should tell you that you are not alone in the speed-concern department. The hardest part for me was realizing that to increase your speed you have to practice simple, boring things until they are coming out your ears. Seriously, its not alternate picking complex scales and arpeggios that beginners should be doing. Its simple, un-musical boring excercises that isolate the technique in question; stuff the sound of which will make you think, "wtf? this isn't guitar playing". Spend an hour a day just working on simple alternate picking excercises. When your hand starts to hurt, take a break and then start again. Think of it not like your playing music, but like you are doing push-ups or sit-ups. If you do not do this, you will not improve. After you get the technique down to where it comes naturally, then move on to scales and arpeggios. Also, you must use a metronome...it is simply a must. There are tons of metronomes available for download free, just google them.

If you can do this, without losing concentration and going off noodling , you will become a shredder.
Last edited by afrika18 at Mar 23, 2007,