#1
I recently took my guitar from texas to utah and the climate change lowered my action significantly. I wanted to raise it using the truss rod, and It's not working. I turned the rod a half turn (ccw) and waited over night. A week later, I turned it again a full turn and waited overnight but the action is still miserably low. I just now turned it ccw about 2 full turns and it isn't budging. What do I do? I considered the option that I broke the rod, but if I broke it, wouldn't the strings be way off the fretboard? Thanks in advance!
#2
I've tightened the action a couple more times, and the strings seem to have lifted off a little but, but the truss rod stopped turning and the strings are still too close to the fretboard. Can you break the truss rod by turning it ccw too much? And shouldnt the strings be significantly higher off the fretboard?
#3
To begin with, truss rods are not for dialing in action. It is true that a neck that is leaning backward will decrease the action and in that case you're right to adjust the truss rod, but then you are turning it the wrong way. I'd suggest you bring it to the shop for a basic set-up. Let the people there show you how and when a minor adjustment like this should be done.

Why do questions like this keep coming up? Why don't guitars, like any other household utensil, come with an owners manual? Do they think guitarists would be offended if they did?
#4
^lol agree with the manual thing

Try adjusting the height of the saddles? the truss rod should be the last thing to adjust as it is delicate.little turns can make huge differences after all other adjustments are made.
#5
There is no way you could have made my point clearer Vampireman. One basic rule is that one should NOT adjust saddles BEFORE the right neck curvature has been dialed in. After having the desired string gauche fitted, adjusting the neck is the first thing that has to be taken care of, not the last.
I beg you Flashbandid; don't listen to us. Go to the shop instead.
#6
Marcel is right. In this case you should take it to a shop. They will probably charge you $10 or $20 to get the thing setup plus strings. If they are a worth while shop, they will let you watch what they do and explain how it all works so that you can make your own adjustments the next time you need them. It's worth paying $20 just to have them show you what to do. The fact that your guitar's action is setup when you are done is like a bonuse.
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