#1
So I've written drum tracks on guitar pro, and for midi or rse or w/e they don't sound bad, but they certainly don't sound realistic.
Is there a way that I turn my midi sequence into something realistic? I have fl studio, but I'm very very new to it, and I might be obtaining reason soon; so is this possible with those tools at hand?
#2
The short answer: no.
Get a decent MIDI-capable keyboard. Most keyboards come with a few different "kits", which just means that each instrument (bass, snare, etc) has a different sound. Then run the MIDI track through the keyboard, back into whatever sequencing program. I'm not sure about FL's capabilities, so that might take some more research.
#3
To make a drum machine sound more 'human' tweaking is nessecary. make it a bit off time, like by 1 500th of a second, and slightly change the volume of the drums each time it plays a certain drum. no drummer is consistent enough to make ALL percussive attacks be the same volume
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#4
Well, I think I phrased my question wrong....
I'm trying to get it to sound better than midi. Is there anyway I can export the midi file from guitar pro and then import it into another program, and use another program's drum kits to at least sound more like a real drum?
#5
Yes you go file > export > midi.

Simple as that than import the midi track into the other program you plan to use.
#6
well taht was the first thing I tried...but either it's more complicated or I did something wrong...
#7
When you export from Guitar Pro, all of the tracks are exported to a *.mid file. If you only want the drum track, then you've got to delete the other tracks. Also make sure that your sequencer allows importation of MIDI files.
I really don't think that software alone is going to give you different drum sounds from a MIDI file. You need an external MIDI device.
#8
There's a freeware program called Anvil Studio which is good for MIDI editing, whenever I write a drum MIDI track and export it from my sequencer I always open it up with Anvil to make sure the number of tracks and MIDI channels etc are all OK.
#9
Quote by limpdogskip
So I've written drum tracks on guitar pro, and for midi or rse or w/e they don't sound bad, but they certainly don't sound realistic.
Is there a way that I turn my midi sequence into something realistic? I have fl studio, but I'm very very new to it, and I might be obtaining reason soon; so is this possible with those tools at hand?


The first step is to read the stuff I've written below because without variation all you'll have is the sound of a computer playing drums. To make it sound like it's actually played by a drummer you need to really work at programming drums and this is how you do it.

To get natural sounding beats and variations you need to not only be able to think drums (what can any human being play at once for instance) but also know a bit about what makes a human drummer differ from a simple drum machine. Here are a frew basic points:

1) No drummer hits the same way twice really. They vary how hard they hit and the strike zone, although small for most drummers, cause a natural variation in timbre. Straight eights on the hihat or the ride are almost always slightly accented on the important 4ths and the 8ths in between vary. For most programming this type of variation is most easily handled by velocity changes.

2) Drummers are not machines. Tempos will vary slightly even if they play to a click track so to make things sound decent you need to subtly alter the tempo throughout a song. As a basic rule choruses tend to be slightly faster than verses (assuming that there are no distinct tempo/meter changes between the two) and no tom fill is ever played straight, most drummers tend to rush a little at the beginning of fills (while inexperienced drummers tend to rush at the end of fills to make it in time for the next measure).

3) Drummer hardly ever hit two drums at the same time. Those tiny, tiny time differences between, say, striking the hi-hat and the snare is something that you don't really notice... unless they aren't there. Try to shift some "notes" around a little so that not everything lines up perfectly.

4) The groove. No drummer in the world play straight eights/sixteenths/whatever, they all vary the spaces between the notes to create that elusive thing called the groove. The easiest way to get at this is to have a number of beats that were recorded by a real drummer to a click track. Then you extract a groove template (or something similar depending on the software) and use that to help bring life to any programmed drum part (keeping number 3 in mind). If your program allows to vary the strength of the applicaiton of the quantizing this is an excellent way of doing things.

5) Don't try to be Mike Portnoy of the drum machine world. (This relates to what can actually be played by any one man.) Simple is almost always better and in the end God really is in the details. Small ghost notes added here and there in a groove might not seem audible once the full mix is up but they actually do make a world of difference and they add the requisite variation so that a simple part doesn't get dull.

Once you have understood and implemented these points then it might be time to actually get a decent sample set so that your newfound knowledge can be expressed at its best but for starters you'll learn more by applying these points to a limited setup. I used to have just a simple sample setup where each drum had two samples, straight and ghost, and I made do with that for a long time.

Quote by limpdogskip
Well, I think I phrased my question wrong....
I'm trying to get it to sound better than midi. Is there anyway I can export the midi file from guitar pro and then import it into another program, and use another program's drum kits to at least sound more like a real drum?


Assuming you read the part above then, yes, you can export MIDI from Guitar Pro. It's as simple as take_it_t said (I did just that earlier today when I was setting up to record a cover tune). Once you have a MIDI track you'll need a sequencer software that can deal with instrument tracks (or something similar) and a sample set of drum/percussion sounds. Something like EZ Drummer or Addictive Drums are fairly inexpensive considering the velocity layers and number of samples they use and I'd recommend either one (I run a scaled-down version of BFD myself and it works like a charm).

Now, when you export MIDI from Guitar Pro it also automatically sends some MIDI control data that you don't really want so when you have imported the MIDI drum track into your sequencer you'll need to open the MIDI Event List Editor (or something similar, it can have slightly different names in different software) and remove everything that isn't a note. To make this easier always start your drum tracks with a blank measure and then a 1-bar count-in. That way all the MIDI control data will end up at the very start of the Event List and you can just delete it all in one go.