#1
Alright i was wondering as i was playing some minor pentatonic scales to a metronome, can more experienced players really just be able to be like

"minor pentatonic, in f"

"Waaaah, nuu nuuh nuh weeeaaahhh!!!"

do you ugys really know all where every note is in like every key so that you can just improvise whatever in the key?

and could you give me some insight to how you learned scales, how long it took to be familiar with them, and etc.
"You know honestly, i don't see myself getting any faster. I mean, you can only hear so much."
-Eddie Van Halen
#2
I don't. Usually when I jam, you have to stay in the key for a song to sound right. Sometimes I use a sheet to remind me where all the F's are in a song just in case I forget, or sometimes I just count up and remind myself. Then from there, I just use the F Major Scale, or Pentatonic, whatever scale you like. Just play with it, but try to remember the notes as well, at least the starting points.
REPETITON OF HATRED dir en grey
#3
Well, you wouldn't say "minor pentatonic in F" -- the scale is up to whoever's soloing.
It would be more like "lets do this progression" and away you go.

For rock its not too hard as there's usually an easily recognizable pattern. You
figure out what key you're in and the flavor of the chords and that will give you some
scale choices. You also have the chord tones to go on. If it's an unfamiliar progression it might take a time or two through it to find what you want to do with
it and that gets easier with experience.

Jazz is more complex but not a lot different. You really have to be much more on top
of the changes for the most part.

And no, I don't know each and every note in a every key right off the bat and I
certainly don't think that way when soloing. You don't have to on the guitar (but
you do on the piano) because changing keys is no more complex than sliding
familiar patterns to the right spot on the neck.
#4
if you ask me to play a note i immediatley knwo where all those notes are. but when im soloing its most important to know where your roots are. and for the rest i dont think in terms of, iwant to hit a G#, i think im gonna hit a minor third, so its very important to know your intervals and do develop your ears
#5
I started by learning the basic A Minor Pentatonic shape and playing with that to a few songs in that key.

After playing around with the notes, runs, licks whatever you call it... I became comfortable with the scale. I then qued up over 500 songs from all sorts of genres.

Mostly 60's-70's rock, but still some newer stuff. Rock, classic, reggae, metal, everything...

I then began playing the minor pentatonic scale all over the fretboard until each note I hit (specially the first root note) sounded in key. When I was satisfied I began solo'ing in that key and it worked well. After a week or two of doing this for 3-4 hours a day I found I was able to almost instantly start from the correct spot and make something that sounds spiffy.

After that, I then expanded to learn the entire C Major scale (which you'll find has the same exact notes as A Minor Pentatnoic and THEN some!

If you look at the full A Minor it's almost the same. The Melodic Desending is the same as C Major, but climbing the scale in A Minor it's a tad different. You shouldn't need to worry about this until you have been playing off feeling for a long while and it should come natrually without even having to stress.

After learning the C Major/A Minor scale completely I found I didn't like too many of the extra notes outside of the pentatonics other than a rare occasion for a special song.

One thing I did to help was placing little sticker dots all up and down the entire fretboard for C Maj/ A Min with the root notes in red, and regular notes in blue. (Really screwed me up when I played modes... haha)

That will make your fretboard dirty but did it ever help. After 2 weeks of that I found myself not looking at the stickers, which is a good thing because they started wearing off as I did bends. I could see where I played the most and where I didn't play. I eventually played until all the stickers had worn off and after that, I knew the fretboard. I could transpose it all over!


Now that I am completely fimiliar both feel wise and theory wise when writing, I expanded on other scales such as spanish gypsy (my ABSOLUTE FAVORITE OF ALL TIME).

It's now just training my fingers to make neat nifty sounds and linking cool runs together. Just remember, don't stay on 1 4 fret portion of the neck, expand alllll over the keyboard. Hitting a wrong note here and there is no worry. It's actually good because your brain will red-flag it and try and remind you not to go there at times like those. (Brain is subconciously powerful!)

I hope this book of what I have done helps. And if you're in a slum, grab a beer or two or tree (if you're of age) play some of your favorite music that almost forces you to get in a "groovy" mood, and try to find that pentatonic scale for that song, then flow with it. If it feels good to you, it'll sound good to someone out there. Every human has a different opinion of sound just as they do food. Either way I find music is really simply a tool for making yourself feel good (and benifically others too). It'll come to you, just make sure you have fun doing it!
#6
i don't know right off the top of my head every note in every scale, but given a scale formula i can work it out very quickly (most people wouldn't even know that i don't know all the notes cuz my brain does it that quick) i can however point to every note on the fretboard and tell you what it is. i think the best piece of advice would be to learn how to incorporate all the different modes into the piece you are playing and also not just learn where the root note is but also what chords are involved as playing leads around the chord shapes can really bring out the song. being able to subconsciously play around the chord progression is one of the highlights that many of the greats do.
#7
I agree, you need to also keep hitting up rhythm + chords. Knowing these well is key to your soloing. Without a background structure on where the music is going, the solo's have no limits and can technically do anything. I suggest playing to your favorite songs a LOT!
#8
Alright i was wondering as i was playing some minor pentatonic scales to a metronome, can more experienced players really just be able to be like

"minor pentatonic, in f"

"Waaaah, nuu nuuh nuh weeeaaahhh!!!"

do you ugys really know all where every note is in like every key so that you can just improvise whatever in the key?

and could you give me some insight to how you learned scales, how long it took to be familiar with them, and etc.


Because the minor pentatonic is EXACTLY the same no matter which key you're in. All you need to do is learn the notes on the fretboard (mainly the bottom 2 strings)...that way, when someone calls up "minor pentatonic in F" all you do is move to the relevant root note- that's the simplest way.
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#9
It really depends. Where some players are quite "Waaaah, nuu nuuh nuh weeeaaahhh!!!"
I'm more "fenenenenene guhn guhn wohmw.. ... ?"

the golden rule of music is everything is in A, so stick to 5th fret pentatonic.
#10
wait, the "golden rule", everything is in a?

what does that mean?
"You know honestly, i don't see myself getting any faster. I mean, you can only hear so much."
-Eddie Van Halen
#11
yes..it's only five notes and only 5 jig saw pattern that fits together
and make up one big pattern...slide those bad boyz over like a a slide
ruler to whatever key. Once i identify the root to whatever key, it's
all down hill.

If you break everthing down there's only two pattern repeating itself
over and over again.

It took me over a year to know where all the notes are at on the fret broad.
I put every thing on paper over and over again.

I actually like guitars without inlays , now. The damn inlays were messing me up.
I just use the litte dots on the top side of the neck.

There's only 12 posisable keys. I practice playing in different keys
as much as posisable. To train my ears and fretboard movement.

The think of those keys as just pitch. The same scale being played
at a different pitch. No need to memorize how many #s or bs.

i did have music at a very young age. So music comprehension helps.
Last edited by Ordinary at Mar 22, 2007,