#1
One thing that I have been wondering about at the moment is which leg to place your guitar on, the right or left. I have had 2 guitar teachers and one told me the left leg is the best one to place the guitar on, and the other one said it is better to place it on the right leg. This has left me a bit confused and would appreciate any comments on this matter.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#3
Quote by MySweetFracture
Left leg for classical, right leg for everything else.


but why? I have heard some players say it is more versatile to play on your left leg(assuming your right handed) It would be cool to know reasons.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#4
Quote by MySweetFracture
Left leg for classical, right leg for everything else.


And your reasoning?

Left leg is the most effecient and allows for the most movement. If you are playing electric, this will also benefit you as it will be much closer to this position when you play standing up as well.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#5
Quote by nightwind
And your reasoning?

Left leg is the most effecient and allows for the most movement. If you are playing electric, this will also benefit you as it will be much closer to this position when you play standing up as well.


yeah,my old guitar teacher said that to me, but my new guitar teacher plays on his right and reckons its better. Also most famous players who I have seen playing acoustic are resting it on their right eg stevie ray vaughan, eric clapton and classical players like john williams and julian bream are using their left. SO it has left me a bit confused.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#6
The classical teachings are pretty solid. The techniques have had a far longer to be mulled over and refined. This is especially true when compared to blues, which has never been about technique and effeciency in every case. Basically, do you go the way that is used by very technical and accurate players, who use it for a playing style that is known for it's accuracy and refined instruction, or go by blues players who aren't as near as concerned with playing technically?

It might be just me, but I'm pretty sure Bream and Williams can outplay Clapton, teehee.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#7
Quote by nightwind
The classical teachings are pretty solid. The techniques have had a far longer to be mulled over and refined. This is especially true when compared to blues, which has never been about technique and effeciency in every case. Basically, do you go the way that is used by very technical and accurate players, who use it for a playing style that is known for it's accuracy and refined instruction, or go by blues players who aren't as near as concerned with playing technically?

It might be just me, but I'm pretty sure Bream and Williams can outplay Clapton, teehee.


Blues players

But I would think that you could do it however you like to. Sure if you are just starting out I would say to go on the left leg because it is proven to be better, but if you have played for a couple years on the right, keep it there.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#8
flamenco players traditionally have the guitars on their right legs. i'm not sure what the reason for this is, but as far as i'm concerned having it on the left leg like is classically taught gives you the best angle to the guitar.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
#9
I think some actual reasoning behind this would be beneficial...

Assuming a right handed player:

On a classical guitar the bell rests on your right thigh, with the hip on your left leg; and your left leg is raised. This puts the guitar in the right position for your right hand when plucking, and aligns the neck of the guitar with the extension of the upper arm -- you use your entire arm to change positions on a classical guitar (it's by far more comfortable, and it keeps your left hand a lot healthier). Left hand position is important, and how high/low the neck is angled affects your left wrist position, shoulder tension, and strain on the arm fretting lower. It also changes the attack from the right hand somewhat. Players tend to vary this position to find the most comfort and versatility for themselves, but the basic position is the same.

For a steel string acoustic, this doesn't work so well -- the dreadnought based designs for modern steel strings are huge compared to a classical body. The scale length is the same, but the rear-protusion of the top-board is longer, and the rear bell is wider. The body is also tends to be a bit deeper than even large classical concert guitars (the largest of the group). The point of having the rear bell so much larger is two fold -- first, the break on the neck (where the fretboard meets the body) is at the 14th fret on a dread or martin designed steel string -- on classical instruments it's at the twelfth. This gives you a higher reach, without having to come over the top. Second, steel strings are much, much twangier than nylon strings, and sound a lot more metallic, the larger rear bell dampens this by increasing the bass resonance for steel strings.

Placing a steel string acoustic on your left leg is pointless (or worse than) for two reasons also. Because of the larger rear bell, it's just simply uncomfortable, and possibly even painful. Second, by extending the guitar to the left of your body, you place your picking system closer to the bridge, giving you a more metallic sound -- defeating the purpose of the larger rear bell altogether.

If you notice, also, when a martin/dread acoustic is strapped (played standing up), it's tied around the headstock, at the nut, by most players. This is a completely different position than an electric strapping, and leaves the guitar in a more right-tending position.

For electrics, most strat, strat copies, and LPs have similar sized bodies to classical guitars, and are strapped so that they tend left more, like a classical also. Really, I think the discussion for electrics is stupid -- find what you prefer, consider why, and whether or not its better (read above), and then decide whehter or not to stick with it. I played my electric on my right for years, until I started playing classical in school, and realized how much more comfortable it was after the initial learning curve.
Quote by les_kris
Corwinoid is God
I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

Member #3 of the Corwinoid Fan Club
#10
Quote by nightwind
The classical teachings are pretty solid. The techniques have had a far longer to be mulled over and refined. This is especially true when compared to blues, which has never been about technique and effeciency in every case. Basically, do you go the way that is used by very technical and accurate players, who use it for a playing style that is known for it's accuracy and refined instruction, or go by blues players who aren't as near as concerned with playing technically?

It might be just me, but I'm pretty sure Bream and Williams can outplay Clapton, teehee.


I see your point. But come on srv and clapton not technical, give me a break The guitar I am learning on at the moment is a steel string and 90% of guitar players I have seen playing steel string rest it on their right leg, and I dont just mean blues players. Jazz, country,rock etc. Ofcourse all classical players I have seen use their left leg, but the right leg position must have some benefits as cornwoid said.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#11
Well, I didn't mention jazz or even rock because most of it is just a sort of descendant of blues.

One can not argue Williams' technique compared to Clapton. My point was though, is that on average, I'd say classical players analyze their technique on a smaller scale, trying to get everything right.

Well explained, Cor. Some factors I never though of. I don't understand what you mean by saying the 'electric guitar discussion is stupid."

Informing thread
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#12
for classical, the left always, for electric, whatever you want, ill play stuff normally on my right, but sometimes, depending on what im playing, ill switch legs because its easier on my right hand to play on my left leg
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#13
i do personally notice that it feels more comfy with my guitar on my left leg and i find it a little easier to move my fretting hand from extremely low on the fretboard to way up there. it's not a massive difference but one that is slightly noticeable. now i shall read what Cor posted and see whats up .
#14
I play without a doubt on the right leg, but I don't play classical, I play a dreadnaught acoustic and an electric guitar.

I would imagine though that whatever works for you and whatever is comfortable is the best option. My teacher and I were talking one day about various theories just with your strumming hand, and he came to the conclusion that you have to do what is comfortable. As some have said above if you are in pain or discomfort it takes the fun/point out of playing.

So do what you've been taught/what is comfortable, I'm sure the classical guitar is smaller so I could imagine it sitting on the left leg.
#15
Its all a matter of personal preference. If you play good with your right leg, use the right leg.
"Isn't it amazing anything's accomplished
When the little sensation gets in your way
Not one ambition whisperin' over your shoulder
Isn't it amazing you can do anything " - Gord Downie

From the song " Fireworks"
#17
Quote by Mikeoman
Its all a matter of personal preference. If you play good with your right leg, use the right leg.


there must be more to it than that. Why do you think every classical player uses their left leg. But come on, how many players do you see playing a steel string on their left. It seems most people in here are saying lefty is the better playing position, but it makes me wonder why my teacher who has been playing for 20 years puts it on his right. In saying that my old guitar teacher said people who play guitar on their right leg are only fooling themselves.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#18
i dont like it on the left leg. its just not right for me. but ive always put it on the right so that might be why. when i put it on the left it feels like the neck is too far away or something. and i dont think the whole thing about it being closer to how it would be if you were standing is right. cuz if i stand up with my guitar straped on and then sit down, its ready to rest on the right leg. plus i play near the neck instead of the bridge so resting it on the right leg makes it easier to do so.
#19
Quote by radiantmoon
there must be more to it than that. Why do you think every classical player uses their left leg. But come on, how many players do you see playing a steel string on their left. It seems most people in here are saying lefty is the better playing position, but it makes me wonder why my teacher who has been playing for 20 years puts it on his right. In saying that my old guitar teacher said people who play guitar on their right leg are only fooling themselves.


only fooling themselves? lol i hate it when people say that because they are usually just trying to seem better than someone else. ive seen some of the best players who had some of the best technical skills and they played on their right leg. honestly, i think that people who think one way is better than the other are fooling them selves.
#20
Well, like I said, right leg is mostly for the steel string players, since the larger bell doesn't fit between your legs (I guess sometimes bigger isn't better for that kind of thing...)
Quote by les_kris
Corwinoid is God
I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

Member #3 of the Corwinoid Fan Club
#21
Quote by radiantmoon
there must be more to it than that. Why do you think every classical player uses their left leg. But come on, how many players do you see playing a steel string on their left. It seems most people in here are saying lefty is the better playing position, but it makes me wonder why my teacher who has been playing for 20 years puts it on his right. In saying that my old guitar teacher said people who play guitar on their right leg are only fooling themselves.


Well, OK, when you play classical you use your left, but if you're playing electric or steel string, which I'm assuming the guy plays( If he were playing classical, I bet he wouldn't be asking this question, because he would be taught to use it on his left) who cares? If you're good with electric on your right leg, play it that way! If you're good with your left, play it that way!
"Isn't it amazing anything's accomplished
When the little sensation gets in your way
Not one ambition whisperin' over your shoulder
Isn't it amazing you can do anything " - Gord Downie

From the song " Fireworks"
#22
Quote by Corwinoid
Well, like I said, right leg is mostly for the steel string players, since the larger bell doesn't fit between your legs (I guess sometimes bigger isn't better for that kind of thing...)


I can quite happily fit my steel string on my left leg I dont think that is the problem, unless i was playing a jumbo. Im still not so clear. I mean are there technical advantages apart from it not fitting between your legs as you say.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#23
Quote by radiantmoon
I can quite happily fit my steel string on my left leg I dont think that is the problem, unless i was playing a jumbo. Im still not so clear. I mean are there technical advantages apart from it not fitting between your legs as you say.


He did mention tonal qualities, but personally I have played my steel string left legged plenty of times with great easy of the left hand, while maintaining devent tone. Hmm
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#24
I have just had a point come to my head. Does anyone find that when the play guitar on their right leg, the guitar is out of balance. I mean the guitar seems to slip away with nothing to stabalize it, where as if its on your left leg its locked in between your legs. Is it just me who finds this problem.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#25
Uhh.... no...
"Isn't it amazing anything's accomplished
When the little sensation gets in your way
Not one ambition whisperin' over your shoulder
Isn't it amazing you can do anything " - Gord Downie

From the song " Fireworks"
#26
Quote by Mikeoman
Uhh.... no...


If you cannot leave a helpful comment, dont bother
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#27
Im in Acoustic guitar ensemble in high school which is the third semester of classical guitar. Our teacher has taught us from the begining to have the guitar rest on the left leg. All the kids in my class do anyways. I suppose it would give better posture to have it on the left leg.
"It is better to die on your feet than to live on your knees"
-Emiliano Zapata
#28
whatever you like, i'm right handed i prefer left leg, i normally switch randomly, sometimes in the middle of songs i'll switch without noticing
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#29
I always sit it on my left leg.
Quote by Gaz_m2k5
Now when people say "Congratulations, I heard you just had a baby" you can say "Thanks! It was delicious."

/#1 reason for having a kid.


PSN: YosemiteSam13
#30
Greetz,

I am a beginner and play a strat sitting down every morning for about an hour or so. For the first couple of weeks, I struggled with which leg to rest it on. I finally concluded always wearing a strap, slightly raised off the lap, sitting up straight, output jack dead center between my legs and the neck about 45 to 50 degrees works best for me. My left hand/arm flows smoothly up and down the neck in this position and my right hand picks comfortably between the neck and bridge pickups.

Regards,

Craig
#31
I would honestly say it's whatever is comfortable, and nothing more. You can go on about how each position can give different ways to perform techniques... but in the end it comes down to how comfortable.

I've personally always sat at my computer with my electric, and it has arms. So I put the body between my legs, resting on the left I suppose, in the "classical" position (right handed). I just cannot play sitting down with it slung horizontal over my right leg... my picking arm is very limited in motion when I do that, and so is my fretting arm.

Think of a backhand in tennis, do you use two hands or one? Whichever's comfortable.
#32
Quote by Dayn
I would honestly say it's whatever is comfortable, and nothing more. You can go on about how each position can give different ways to perform techniques... but in the end it comes down to how comfortable.

I've personally always sat at my computer with my electric, and it has arms. So I put the body between my legs, resting on the left I suppose, in the "classical" position (right handed). I just cannot play sitting down with it slung horizontal over my right leg... my picking arm is very limited in motion when I do that, and so is my fretting arm.

Think of a backhand in tennis, do you use two hands or one? Whichever's comfortable.


just because something is more comfortable does not mean it is the best option technically. Im more comfortable with my thumb over the neck of the guitar but this limits stretching with my fingers. So its not always whats more comfortable.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#33
Quote by radiantmoon
just because something is more comfortable does not mean it is the best option technically. Im more comfortable with my thumb over the neck of the guitar but this limits stretching with my fingers. So its not always whats more comfortable.

Well yeah, comfortable with what you're doing. If you're shredding all over the place, thumb behind the neck will be more comfortable, even if you find thumb over the neck is normally comfortable.

That's what I was getting at, it all boils down what's the most comfortable with what you're doing. I can certainly see why classical guitar is played like it is; much more comfortable to play that way for what you'd be doing.
#34
When I'm playing my acoustic guitar I rest it on my right leg when I am playing anything, even classical. When I am playing my electric guitar I play standing up most of the time.
#35
What we're talking about is Classical (left leg) vs Casual (right leg) styles. Both
are equally valid given your situation (which I think Corowind explained pretty well).

Personally when using an electric solid body, I play either way depending on how
I feel. However, the classical position I've found is totally superior in terms of
supporting the guitar (to keep it from moving around), positioning your right arm
for picking, and giving good access to the entire neck for fretting.

There's also the "laying in bed" position which I also use a lot, but that I would
totally NOT recommend for practicing in general
#36
Quote by edg
What we're talking about is Classical (left leg) vs Casual (right leg) styles. Both
are equally valid given your situation (which I think Corowind explained pretty well).

Personally when using an electric solid body, I play either way depending on how
I feel. However, the classical position I've found is totally superior in terms of
supporting the guitar (to keep it from moving around), positioning your right arm
for picking, and giving good access to the entire neck for fretting.

There's also the "laying in bed" position which I also use a lot, but that I would
totally NOT recommend for practicing in general


are you just talking about for classical or steel string aswel
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.