#1
Hey guys. As the title suggests, I'm pretty good at soloing. I'm not satisfied though. I can solo quite well on a melody at say, 120 bpm and slower, simply because I have time to think. I want to step it up and be able to improvise solos at much faster speeds, say 150 bpm and higher. Can anyone here (preferably someone educated on the matter) give me the key to unlock this skill?

I know quite a bit of music theory, an above average amount I'd say, and my technique is above average as well. I've been playing for three years. I listen to mostly shred/progressive music such as Vai, Dream Theater, Opeth, etc. Any help would be awesome. Thanks.
#2
the only thing i can think to suggest is take a part of a faster solo you enjoy, first master that. then alter it and experiment.
#3
Opeth is the shit, but anyways learn modes, it'll change the style and flavor of your playing. But if you already know modes, then try to figure out what notes are good to bend and/or slur to; in Blues you cant go wrong with bending the 3, 5, and 7. Or it could be as simple as finding the right notes to hit, sometimes the key can have some notes that wont go with the song at all.
#4
^ Thanks for the advice, but like I said, I'm a good soloist, I've done all the experimentation and am pretty good at coming up with solos when I have the time to think about and listen to what I'm doing. It's when I don't have time to think that I have trouble with. I want someone who really knows how to rip to come in here and teach me how to step my playing up into those thrash/power metal speeds.
#6
Richie Blackmoore's Blackmoore Night is an amazing band, try anything with his stuff, some really excellent guitar styles there. If you wanna try your hands at a good finger picking song Celtic guitar should keep you busy for a while. If you are just looking to get your mind into the right mental state for playinng faster why not try finger picking songs, gives you more options of notes to play which in turn has potental to be faster, even at a basic tempo you would have to put your mind at a faster pace because you have to think about harmonizing your fingers for solo'ing with it. That should help you a bit with getting into the right metal game.
#7
Quote by tweeres04
^ Thanks for the advice, but like I said, I'm a good soloist, I've done all the experimentation and am pretty good at coming up with solos when I have the time to think about and listen to what I'm doing. It's when I don't have time to think that I have trouble with. I want someone who really knows how to rip to come in here and teach me how to step my playing up into those thrash/power metal speeds.


someone please post the link to melodic control for this guy. seriously though if nobody posts it, then its on either google or yahoo videos (i can't remember which) just do a search for "melodic control" it's a EXCELLENT video lesson by one of the masters of tearing it up, marty friedman himself. it would be in your best interest to watch it repeatedly.

edit: and remember, faster isn't always necessarily better. it's good to play fast, but sometimes the best thing to do is lay off and not totally tear it up. a solo needs dynamic movements, remember that!
#8
just because the bpm is higher, doesnt necassarly mean you have to play faster, there are notes other than 16ths. sometimes some soulful bends work as well as or better than the fastest runs in the world
#9
dimebag said once that some of his best solos he'd just play a couple notes and bend the sh!t out of them. i agree with that mindset. theres a time and place for everything, knowing when to use what you have is as important i think as having the ability
#13
Immerse yourself in other styles, adapt to the things you like in those styles and reinvent/reinspire yourself with it. And, faster doesn't alwasy mean better; You listen to Opeth, their solo in Windowpane is the shit, but its decently midpaced. Or In My Time of Need, it's a cool bending riff in thirds, I think. Simple yet effective. Don't go for a big flashy solo that'll impress everybody, go for a solo that's in service to the song.
#14
Now i'm not a master soloist myself but it seems your caught up in the whole "faster bpm=more notes/faster playing" thats true for the most part but if you can play comfortably 16th notes on 120 bpm then triplets on 150 should be cake and thats more than enough for a good melodic solo. Improvising at that speed comes with time though the only way to practice improv is to do it.
#15
Modes are the ticket kiddo
"It is better to die on your feet than to live on your knees"
-Emiliano Zapata
#16
This whole melodic control video makes me so angry. Everyone praises it for what a great piece of video it is, but since i have dial-up, I can't sit down and watch it without waiting for it to load for 10hrs. i have gotten about 5 mins into it, but then it's like 3 in the morning!!

does anyone know where i could download it or could someone give me the file through email or something??
hmmmm...
#17
It's funny, I came across it and was in the middle of watching it when it was suggested in this thread. I've watched the whole thing, and it was all pretty much review for me. I'll restate: I'm a good soloist. I use modes, accidentals, and I consider myself to be a pretty good soloist. But like I said, my mind can't seem to keep up with faster tempos, and, as a result, I just throw out a generic solo every time. My question: How do people think while playing at these fast speeds? Do they just refine their technique so that they're playing from muscle memory? Do they actually think? I'd just like to know what's going through a person's head while they play a fast solo like that. Thanks.
#18
Theres more to solos than speed
"It is better to die on your feet than to live on your knees"
-Emiliano Zapata
#19
the best advice i think when playing at fast speed is to just make sure you have your chord prorgressions down and know what notes come next. a large part os knowing what notes sound good when blended together. aside from that also remember one major part which is dynamics. remember you can start off full throttle and go non stop, but wouldn't its ound better if when you did start off full throttle after a couple bars you changed it up and played against the chords instead of with them, such as quarter notes where there are eighths, also remember to create melodies around the chord progression that are independent of the actual chord progression, there is this thing called motion (which is basically one parts of the song moving in a different direction than the other) things like contrary and oblique motion, this has to do more so with counter point and i would definately recommend learning some counterpoint as well as that will help you immensely.
#20
No guitarist plays really fast improvised solos without a whole lot of licks stuffed in his muscle memory. That's the whole point, you shouldn't have to think while improvising, it should just flow out of you.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

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