#1
What are some tips for being able to remember every single note in the fingerboard at a drop of the hat?
My stalker can beat up your stalker
#2
Low E and high E are the same..and they're all in "music alphabetical" order. I guess there's no real tips, just remember frets 1-12 (since 13-24 are 1-12 repeated/octave higher) and try to remember as best as you can.
#3
saying the name of the note your playing helps

and Paul Simonon of The Clash actually painted the names of the notes on his fretboard, if your that rad.
Dissonance is Bliss


Signal Chain:
Carvin CT-4
Ibanez TS-9
Carvin Quad-X
TC Electronics G-Major
Mesa/Boogie 2:90
Ear Candy BuzzBomb



Member #4 of the Carvin Club
#4
Hmm dude thats a tough one its different for everyone i guess i learnt upto fret 12 in no time at all then i just work out the rest if i need them so soon enough i will know them all just take your time and learn slower rather than super fast and gettin them wrong gd luck =]
#6
I used a paint pen and writ al the note on an old squire, then just play through the notes playing all the C's on every string, then all the D's and so on i find this a great way u dont have to paint them on eiher but doing that exercise will help a lot. hope it helps
carl
#7
I just use octaves to know what the notes are on different strings. Also when you're playing a song or something, challenge yourself and call out each different note as you play it.
#8
i cut out little pieces of paper and wrote the note name on them then taped them to the neck. that helped me learn really fast and by the time they fell off i already knew them.
#10
Remember to listen to the tone of the sound that's coming out of your guitar, not just memorizing which fret you're on when you play a certain note. Learning to pick up notes by ear is excellent for future guitar playing and learning.
ಥ_ಥ
#11
Just know that every note is two frets apart, except B-C, and E-F i think, which are right next to each other, and thats pretty much all i use to remember.

Using Octaves to fing notes on other strings too, thats helpful.
#13
just say out loud every note you play.

Like I play through a scale and I say each note out loud, or if playing a chord say out loud which root note it is.....works for me
#15
eff#gg#aa#bcc#dd#e

remember all the strings, low E is the thikest string, it goes

e(being open) f(1st fret) f# g g#a a# b c c#d d# e(12th fret)

then second thickest string is A, it goes.

a(being open) a#(1st fret) b c c# d d# e f f# g g# a a#(12th fret)
Quote by Finnepinne
It was probably a black man who talked. "oh don' go in there gurl, he behind the doh~"

And then got shot.
#16
learn perfect pitch
[thats being able to listen to any sound made and tell exactly what note it is, or notes its between. (pretty freaky i know)]
Wisest is she who knows she does not know.
#17
there's this program for that I think.. the program itself however is overrated IMO..
^_^
#18
theres a program called fret2fret, if u wanna dish out 30 bucks u can learn it pretty quick... i teaches it pretty well but it all just depends on wether or not u wanna dish out 30 bucks to know it
#19
I personally just don't actually know them all, but I have a "dynamic" note system I know them not from memory, but by "So, if that's the same as that chord's root, it's an _....and I'm 3 frets from there, so it's a _..." It works.

I didn't set out to learn them, just as my playing advanced, I somehow ended up doing it Works pretty well, if you have a few years of playing behind you.
#21
Realistically, you don't need to know every note, just how to find them fairly quickly, Unless you plan on becoming an acomplished classical guitar player, when you will need to read musical manuscript, though by that stage, you'll probably..be able to tell the notes by ear lol.

Learn them at the fret markers on each string
#24
See, the notes on E are:

E (open)
F - 1
F# - 2
G - 3
G# - 4
A - 5
A# - 6
B - 7
C - 8
C# - 9
D - 10
D# - 11
E (12th fret)

See how the open string and 12th fret have the same note?

Now, take the second string, A

The order will be:

A (open)
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A (12th fret)

Now, guess the pattern on D, G and B.
You simply MUST check out my music on
Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.
#25
Quote by WantToLearn
What does knowing all the notes help you with?


It helps you when working out scales.
You simply MUST check out my music on
Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.
#26
If you know all your notes (not all their positions) you can very easily identify them on the fretboard. When I was learning this stuff, my technique was basing everything around the obvious notes like at the fifth, and twelfth frets. For example, knowing that on the E string the fifth fret is A and the twelfth is E, I can quickly deduct that the ninth fret is a C#.

See what I mean? Learn the more obvious notes on the fretboard, and base everything around that. Soon enough you won't even have to think about what note is where, you'll just know.

I know you had your answer already, but I just thought I'd share my idea since nobody has mentioned anything like it yet...
SUPER BOWL XLVIII
D E N V E R B R O N C O S vs. S E A T T L E S E A H A W K S
#27
Just remember when working down one string there is no B# or E# as in B's and C's are together and E's and F's are together. Other than that they are in ABC order with #'s put in.
#28
Quote by Pan-Tallica
If you know all your notes (not all their positions) you can very easily identify them on the fretboard. When I was learning this stuff, my technique was basing everything around the obvious notes like at the fifth, and twelfth frets. For example, knowing that on the E string the fifth fret is A and the twelfth is E, I can quickly deduct that the ninth fret is a C#.

See what I mean? Learn the more obvious notes on the fretboard, and base everything around that. Soon enough you won't even have to think about what note is where, you'll just know.

I know you had your answer already, but I just thought I'd share my idea since nobody has mentioned anything like it yet...


Thats exactly how I do it as well. I already know all the notes from open to the 5th fret, so from there I can just do the math.

When the note is past the 12 fret, I think of it just as the 12 fret was open because the 12th fret is the same note as open on the same string. If it is before the 12 fret, I usually move up a string and back 5 frets until I get into the first 5 fret zone.

Also remember that you will not be able to learn it just like that. It will take years of playing if you want to remember all of the notes. So just practice and try to learn as you go, dont force it down your throat.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#29
Quote by WantToLearn
What does knowing all the notes help you with?

I don't think it is uber important to know every note but knowing anchor notes that you can caculate each note off of is important. The note of each open string for ex.
#30
yeah, i can read notation in first position, but i want to be able to in all positions
My stalker can beat up your stalker
#31
Dude i totally dont know any of the notes like off my head or anything. I dont even remember what each string is what while open. i Know there i the 6=e 5=a 4=d and 2=b#? :S 1=e
I have no idea how to read notes either! i guess i somehow manage to teach myself stuff. I am very good with telling like uh...pitches n stuff. I just memorize all common chord placements, and scales n stuff. I guess i kinda have the juggernaut system here, lol
#32
^ Whatever works for you, lol.

(3=g and 2=b)
SUPER BOWL XLVIII
D E N V E R B R O N C O S vs. S E A T T L E S E A H A W K S
#33
I've heard that it can be useful if you only remember the positions of the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, and G without the sharps and flats. (would natural notes be the correct term for these?)
#34
get a metronome. set it to 60. start by playing every E on the fretboard to the metronome. increase the speed to 65 or 70. do all the E's again. increase the speed and do all the E's. then keep increasing the speed. the next day do all the F's. LEARN ONLY ONE NOTE PER DAY!!! then on the third day revise the E and the F. the next day do all the F#'s. the next day do all the G's. the next day revise E, F, F# and G. keep doing this and revise all the previous notes every third day. when you know where all 12 notes are. practice them everyday. this works trust me. it takes a while but it works. petrucci said so. or was it satriani? i forget but it was one of them two.
I have been described as a lighthouse in the middle of a bog: Brilliant but useless.