#1
Hey

I'm not at all clear on the different picking motions: translatory, ratational and oscillatory. I have read the patti and tuck articles etc and I understand the concepts, but for example I don't see what the doorknob example (rotational) has to do with playing guitar unless you were contorted into a very odd position with your hand twisted round to perform this movement.

Likewise, for oscillation, why move your hand in and out when the strings are side to side?

At the moment, what I perceive to be the right thing to do is: I'm using a right hand technique which is like fast pulsing/flicking movement and it feels like i'm using the same muslces as when you would rap a door quickly - Yet this doesn't look to involve the in and out motion of oscillation?!?!?


Does anyone have videos/pictures of these three styles? I've looked on the old articles but the links are 1+ years old and don't work for me.


Thanks
#2
well for oscillation... it will help in trying to create a fading in and out effect.

the rest I have no idea.
#3
'well for oscillation... it will help in trying to create a fading in and out effect.'

What on earth does that mean?
#4
It allows you to control volume easier - allowing for crescendos and diminuendos through picking itself rather than volume swells.
#5
Quote by GreasedKrist
Hey

I'm not at all clear on the different picking motions: translatory, ratational and oscillatory. I have read the patti and tuck articles etc and I understand the concepts, but for example I don't see what the doorknob example (rotational) has to do with playing guitar unless you were contorted into a very odd position with your hand twisted round to perform this movement.


Maybe, you're confusing "doorknob". I think in that article it's referring to "door knocking" and NOT "doorknob opening".

Door knocking would be the least common. You'd have to have the pick gripped
like the "Benson" grip for it to make any sense. With that grip and pick attack on the
strings, wrist movement IS very much like knocking on a door.

Doorknob turn is just the usual pick grip with the axis of wrist rotation around the
forearm.
#6
Quote by edg
Door knocking would be the least common. You'd have to have the pick grippedlike the "Benson" grip for it to make any sense. With that grip and pick attack on the strings, wrist movement IS very much like knocking on a door.
.


Is that technique the one where rather than holding the pick between the side of the index and whole flat of thumb, you hold it as if you were eating a crisp? Just lightly at the tip of the thumb and index? If so thats what Im doing, and have been doing for years.

I think I understand the oscillation movement but it would be really helppful if there some videos of a sort.
Quote by Robbie n strat
In the changing rooms we'd all jump around so our dicks and balls bounced all over the place, which we found hilarious.



Little children should be felt, not heard.
#7
the style of picking has nothing to do with the volume of the note. it has to do with dynamics, and how much of the pick extends below the string
mydadisjewish = avatar stealer
#8
The Benson grip would be holding the pick on the TIP of the thumb and the index
wrapped over it and kind of locking the pick in place. The tip of the pick would kind
of be pointing to the left if you held it in your right hand out in front of you. It's
at a weird angle. Because of that you'd tend to make a door knock motion,
#9
Quote by edg
The Benson grip would be holding the pick on the TIP of the thumb and the index
wrapped over it and kind of locking the pick in place. The tip of the pick would kind
of be pointing to the left if you held it in your right hand out in front of you. It's
at a weird angle. Because of that you'd tend to make a door knock motion,


But it doesnt impede you in any way?
Quote by Robbie n strat
In the changing rooms we'd all jump around so our dicks and balls bounced all over the place, which we found hilarious.



Little children should be felt, not heard.