#1
i just wanted to know how to right a trivium-like riff on guitar?

like both rythm and lead
#2
that's a very obscure question that nobody can answer. the way to write a riff is to just go ahead and play something that comes into your head, rather than ask pointless questions.

just a friendly bit of advice
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#4
Listen to their music and draw inspiration from it. We can't tell you how to be creative.
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#5
You figure it out eventually, by yourself. It's part of becoming an original and creative musician.
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#8
Quote by timbo2418
triviums gay


Is there a light in that closet of yours?
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
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Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer
#9
take a chord progression, but a scale in the same key...bend stuff, tap stuff....riff!
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#10
triviums gay

Insulting the dude's taste in music isn't helping this thread, is it?
I'm not a big Trivium fan, but that doesn't mean the guy can't write what he wants.

Anyway, it is a broad topic. It does help to learn scales because once you get an ear for what scales lend themselves to what sounds, you have a good framework to build off of. It will also save a lot of time when you're trying to find 'that sound'.

It is helpful to study the music you are interested in and study the characteristics that make them interesting to you. For example, Metallica uses the Aeolian mode of G, or an E minor scale with a touch of Phrygian (flat seconds) and blues scale (the tritone, or flat fifth) mixed in for a touch of evil. Ear training helps a lot here, too, but that can take a very long time to develop.

Just take the time to study and play and it will come with time. I can't say that I can write any killer riffs, but I am finding it flows easier every time I try.
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#11
Quote by marcus00
Insulting the dude's taste in music isn't helping this thread, is it?
I'm not a big Trivium fan, but that doesn't mean the guy can't write what he wants.

Anyway, it is a broad topic. It does help to learn scales because once you get an ear for what scales lend themselves to what sounds, you have a good framework to build off of. It will also save a lot of time when you're trying to find 'that sound'.

It is helpful to study the music you are interested in and study the characteristics that make them interesting to you. For example, Metallica uses the Aeolian mode of G, or an E minor scale with a touch of Phrygian (flat seconds) and blues scale (the tritone, or flat fifth) mixed in for a touch of evil. Ear training helps a lot here, too, but that can take a very long time to develop.

Just take the time to study and play and it will come with time. I can't say that I can write any killer riffs, but I am finding it flows easier every time I try.


Although your post has merit, your signature leaves the taste of weed and hooker spit in my mouth.
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
Crate Palamino Class A tube combo
Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer
#12
I believe that's the distinct odour of Marlboro's and Dr. Pepper. Common mistake.

Guitars:
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
Ibanez S-470 with Seymour Duncans
Ibanez RG-321
Schecter Damien 6
Art & Lutherie Wild Cherry

Amps:
Kustom 12 Gauge
#13
Quote by marcus00
I believe that's the distinct odour of Marlboro's and Dr. Pepper. Common mistake.



Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
Crate Palamino Class A tube combo
Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer
#14
try playing around with D A# C chord progression to start and just add little riffs here and there
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#16
Well, other than learning theory, just learn some of their songs or at least part of them. After you learn it, analyze what they did and try to incorporate some of their techniques or progressions. Of course, this doesn't mean completely rip them off. It takes time too so don't expect to write a masterpiece within the first day...
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#19
I think eventually it just starts to come to you. You have to start to get a feel of the music and riffs will come. Using theory and stuff is more important if you are doing jazz, complex soloing or so called "Math Metal".
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