#1
With all other thing being equal(pups/wood/etc), what is the difference in sound between an LP and SG style guitar and which types of music are they better suited for?
My gear...

Samick Les Paul (AV6VB) Guitar w/ SD Alnico2/JB
Marshall AVT150H halfstack
Schecter Stiletto Elite-4 Bass
Ampeg BA112 Bass Amp
#2
^ well the thing is m8, LP's and SGs have different pickups and the LP has a maple top which is why they sound different. If they didn't then they wouldn't sound ne different.
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#3
Quote by eddiehimself
^ well the thing is m8, LP's and SGs have different pickups and the LP has a maple top which is why they sound different. If they didn't then they wouldn't sound ne different.


so what youre saying is that, if it wasnt the way it is, it wouldnt be the way it is.

Deep stuff man. Deep.
#4
Well an SG has les mass and i do beleive doesnt have that extra wood top on it. and so the SG would be rawer where as the LP would be more full bodied
#5
Quote by eddiehimself
^ well the thing is m8, LP's and SGs have different pickups and the LP has a maple top which is why they sound different. If they didn't then they wouldn't sound ne different.

I'm pretty sure that epiphone SG's and LP's have the same pickups.
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#6
What type of music is each targeted at, and what type of stock pups do they usually put in them?
My gear...

Samick Les Paul (AV6VB) Guitar w/ SD Alnico2/JB
Marshall AVT150H halfstack
Schecter Stiletto Elite-4 Bass
Ampeg BA112 Bass Amp
#7
Quote by Staz80
What type of music is each targeted at, and what type of stock pups do they usually put in them?


LP's are pretty versatile, people have used them for blues, Slash uses it for big hair style stuff, they have pretty deep tones to them, nice bass.

SG's are more restricted, in my opinion. Listen to Angus Young of ACDC for some examples on the tone of the SG. Its a bit more treble oriented, not so much bass, but it makes up for it in the distortion it can pump out.

Never been a fan of the SG feel, but it looks real nice in my opinion.
#9
i personally prefer LP's love the feel, the neck,the tone, the weight, the look everything. i cant find a fault with it

i also love sg's ive got a SG mahogony blank body sat in my cupboard ready for my custom project i just cant afford it. actually i just been reminded of it. might get to work on that bad boy cause it will end up great
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#10
I'm just gonna come right out and say it: Not a big SG fan. I have a Gibson SG and it just suits me much better. It has a lot more upper range response to it and it seems like the pickups have a little of a compression effect to them. What I mean is that my SG sounds like other humbucker guitars do with a bit of compression on them.

SGs are much lighter than LPs and are pretty much solid mahogany whereas LPs have a maple top over the solid mahogany body. Try them side by side to hear the difference.
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#11
SGs have a much rawer, more treble/gain oriented tone. They do rock incredibly well, but can also do blues, classic metal, and can just pull off the jazz tone.
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#12
SG's are a more "aggressive" LP, if you wanted to make that distinction, but theyre both really the same depending on amp and stuff, as well as how you play.

SG's have a massive midrange spike thats good for hard rock, though. i'm personally a fan of both SGs and LPs...cant complain.
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#13
Personal Preference really, in the end thats what it all comes down to
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#14
Quote by musicalfish
SG's do rock incredibly well, but can also do blues, classic metal, and can just pull off the jazz tone.


I disagree, I wouldn't ever play blues on an SG. I hate the tone on that guitar for blues.
#15
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I'm gonna agree with most posts here, it's all down to preference.

SG's are a bit more aggressive and playable.

LP's have a deeper bass and thick sound. You can do well with both, but I personally like the LP cause of the feel and the looks and of course the sound, just an amazing guitar.

SG's are also good, i've played alot infact most days i'm in a store it's the SG I pick up. Just go to the store and try both out, you can't go too wrong with either.
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#16
Quote by JDawg4098
I disagree, I wouldn't ever play blues on an SG. I hate the tone on that guitar for blues.

Tell that to clapton.
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#17
Quote by Jinskee
Tell that to clapton.


In all of the concerts i've seen him in, he's either played his true hollowbody electric like in "Hail Hail, Rock n Roll!" or his strat for songs like Layla.

As a matter of fact, he was playing a strat in my hometown not 2 days ago.

I have a hard time seeing him playing an SG at all, to tell you the truth. Maybe back in the early 70's late 60's. But now? Nah. He's sticking to fender.
#18
I was quite surprised myself seeing clapton playing the SG, but he did back in the day.
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-2-channel Titan
-Oversized Bogner 2x12 Cabinet
-Fulltone OCD
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-T.C. Electronic Nova Delay
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#21
I play blues on my SG all the time. My SG has a thicker, midsier sound than my friends American Strat and that's exactly the tone I look for when playing the blues. Then again, John Mayer gets pretty sweet blues tones out of his strats and he actually has custom pickups that scoop out the mids so...
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#22
The thing that almost always goes unmentioned in discussions like this is the fact that where the body and the neck join on the bass side is very important to both tone and playability. On a single cut guitar, (i.e.- les pauls, teles, prs singlecuts...) the body and the neck meet around the 16th fret. This makes it a little more difficult to play in the upper registers but also gives the tone a boost in the midrange, giving it the perception, and actuallity of being louder, thicker wood or not. On a double cut away guitar, (i.e. - sg, strats, prs stds...) the neck and the body meet further to the end of the neck, meaning that there is easier access to the upper frets, but a lot of mid's are lost, the thickness isn't quite there...
Well, uh... there you go...

-h
#23
Quote by hvpiratevninja
The thing that almost always goes unmentioned in discussions like this is the fact that where the body and the neck join on the bass side is very important to both tone and playability. On a single cut guitar, (i.e.- les pauls, teles, prs singlecuts...) the body and the neck meet around the 16th fret. This makes it a little more difficult to play in the upper registers but also gives the tone a boost in the midrange, giving it the perception, and actuallity of being louder, thicker wood or not. On a double cut away guitar, (i.e. - sg, strats, prs stds...) the neck and the body meet further to the end of the neck, meaning that there is easier access to the upper frets, but a lot of mid's are lost, the thickness isn't quite there...
Well, uh... there you go...

-h


SGs still sound pretty thick to me...
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UG 83
#25
oh I'm not saying that they aren't thick sounding... but you have to admit, les Pauls are thicker...

-h
#27
Quote by hvpiratevninja
oh I'm not saying that they aren't thick sounding... but you have to admit, les Pauls are thicker...

-h


No, Les Pauls are the thickest. I've never heard an electric guitar that sounds as thick as an LP.
Quote by John Mayer
"'What do you do when you've seen the most stupendous, stunning, earth-shattering show of all time?' Uh...I dunno...stop using hyperbole?"


UG 83
#29
I'll tell you really how it is.

QUOTE: SOMEONE-

With a LP, you get that smooth, creamy sound that just seems to sing, "Turn on the high gain. You know you want to."

On the other hand, the SG grabs you by your balls and screams in your face, "I'm the juggernaut, bitch!"


But yeah, pretty much what everyone else has said.

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