#1
Anyone good at counterpoint? I'm in highschool Music Theory 1 and we've learned Species 1-4 counterpoint, and everyone in my class except for me thinks its hard. For each species we had a race to see who would be the first person to finish a counterpoint for a given cantus fermus with no mistakes first. I always won.

I find it very fun... so... anyone else learn it this early and enjoy it? My music theory teacher said that usually people dont learn it until college.
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#3
I kinda learned it in my freshman year in college. It's not all that hard, you just need to know your intervals and stuff.
Oh crap!
#4
You're just barely touching the surface of counterpoint, though you sound as if you've taken a good grasp on understanding. I'll tell you there are books upon books and pages upon pages of material about counterpoint with different theories and such. I'll agree it's a very interesting subject, and like you I've really only just touched the surface of it's possibilities.
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#5
Quote by SillyRabbit
explain a counterpoint I have no clue what it means


Basically you get a melody called a cantus fermus, and you have to build a separate melody called a counterpoint off of it. There's a few different species that have their own rules and I dont really feel like discussing. Im gonna check for a article on UG, and if theres none Im going to write one.
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#6
Ohhhhhh I actually know what ur talking about its where you make a riff right, then you want to make a riff that builds from that one???
#7
Quote by SillyRabbit
Ohhhhhh I actually know what ur talking about its where you make a riff right, then you want to make a riff that builds from that one???


kind of yes, kind of no, because its played at the same time, its like when you have 2 guitarists playing a riff, and ones playing like, 1-2-b3, and the others playing 5-4-b3 or something
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#8
I'm a huge fan of counterpoint. I'm writing a song that uses it heavily at the moment, though it doesn't subscribe to any of the traditional rules.
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#9
some rules in classical music , which may apply to traditionally to "counterpoint"
are :
The bass part leaps in 4ths,5ths or ocatves .

the alto and tenor parts resolve together as a part of a 3rd or a 5th
the soprano part resolves as an octave to the alto or tenor , part,

of course these rules are made to be broken .
#10
for everybody who wrote what they thought it was (except for the threadstarter and damienguitar) wiki it to find out what it really is. its most easily explained that way. a simple way of putting it would be to write 2 melodies that have different motion.
#11
If I'm not misunderstanding what counterpoint is, then I think my dad and I do it all the time while solo'ing together by feel.
#12
most theory classes teach counterpoint....


so I think your professor was saying most high schools dont teach theory. lol
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#13
Oh yeah i know some counterpoint yeah you need a lead and rythym guitarist, you each play a riff In similar length duration of notes,and play the similiar note pattern to make it vary from the two riffs. They use counterpoint in alot of Opeth as far as i can tell by my ear.
#14
My guitar teacher has gone over counterpoint with me before. To me, it comes best with simple experimentation and stuff... when you can pull it off well, though, it sounds phenomenal.
Study some Bach pieces if you want a sweet grasp of how it souns (and looks on sheet music). Pretty much anything by him provides great examples... didn't he write books on it or something? Or at least one book? Take a look at Toccata & Fugue in D minor sometime. Astounding.