#1
Hey, first post =) I was wondering if plugging my guitar directly into my pc and using something like Guitar Rig or Garage band and then adding drums etc in using fruity loops or similar would produce any good sounds? Because i don't really want to spend any money, a little short at the minute. Yet i don't want it to sound horrible either. Does anyone have any recordings they've done with this method? Thanks!
#2
If you plug straight into your PC the sound is rather dry as its just the signal straight from the pick-ups. If you have something like Adobe audition software it can add effects like distortion, delay, chorus, flange, phase etc. Plus reverb to give some depth the sound. It doesn't sound great but you can tweak levels and effects to make it sound pretty good for what it is.

Another way is to buy a cheap microphone and mic up your amp and record that way. You get a better quality tone and natural reverb. I used my mate's £1 mic for some recordings and the difference from direct recording was amazing.
#3
Wow really? I tried using my 20 quid mic but no matter how i set it up it sounded like shit. Thanks. I think i'll try direct input and if i can't get it sounding good i'll probably invest in a good mic.
#4
I found that with the mic the recordings tended to be very quiet so the answer was to turn up the amp rather than input volume. I'm not quoting exact science either, its just what I've experienced.

Try getting adobe audition. I downloaded it off the net. The reverb effects can make even the most dry recording bright. I haven't tried Guitar Rig or garage Band so I can't comment on those.
#6
How far away/loud do you have your amp? Because i can't get a nice sound from it :/ Thanks.
#7
Quote by ludakot
Hey, first post =) I was wondering if plugging my guitar directly into my pc and using something like Guitar Rig or Garage band and then adding drums etc in using fruity loops or similar would produce any good sounds?


With Guitar Rig or Amplitube you can definitely get good results that way. Even the SansAmp PSA-1 plugin can get some good results for general heavy metal. I personally prefer a standalone amp sim (I use the Vox ToneLab) but I haven't used an amp for recording guitar or bass in years now. Problem is that even if you have a decent mic you have to know how to position it and even then it really helps to have a fairly non-resonant room. Most people tend to forget that what they hear is almost never what the microphone picks up.
#8
I tried to put the mic as close to the speaker as possible. You have to just keep trying different positions until you find a sound that suits you. Just make sure the part of the mic that picks up the sound is facing towards the speaker.

The volume of the amp also depends on how loud your recordings are. If they're too quiet turn up, if they're too loud then turn down. That's about all I can tell you.