#1
I am fairly new to electric guitar, just learning to solo using pentatonic scales, etc. I have noticed that really good players keep their fingers really low to the fretboard and hardly move their fingers at all. My fingers really jump high. They basically know where to go due to massive repitition but i am concerned that I am deveoping a bad habit but I just cant seem to keep them low. Any ideas or drills that i can do? Has anyone had this problem and conquered it?
#2
Play scales and chromatics very slowly, concentrating on your finger movements, eventually they will stay low automatically.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
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#3
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Play scales and chromatics very slowly, concentrating on your finger movements, eventually they will stay low automatically.

Well, I think you just hit a nerve w me. I have been trying to play fast but as you can imagine, it sounds all sloppy. Sometimes I hit a clean note but often, they're blurry. Maybe I could slow down eh? Thanks, great advice. Would love more, espeically drills.
#4
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/correct_practice/warm_ups_iv.html

These are from John Petrucci's Rock Discipline DVD, if you need a break from just scales.

The most important thing is that your movements are controlled, and for that you need to go slow.

I very strongly advise using a metronome or drum machine to play along with.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
yeah everybody is dead on cap'n. i've been playing for about 12 years now and i can go pretty quick now mainly cuz i started out slow. NEVER EVER go faster than what you can do cleanly and accurately. it may take a little while but speed comes from accuracy and is a direct byproduct of it. the best thing to do is practice slowly and pay VERY close attention to what your hands are doing. make sure that all your hand movements are economical (something a lot of beginners don't do is use your pinky, remember even if it isnt very strong, its still there, let it do its job on the guitar. using your pinky is one of the most economical things you can do besides finger placement)
#6
exercise that helped me tremendously:

put all of your fingers on one string from the fifth fret to the eighth. Now move one of them to the next string without lifting the other ones at all and pick that, then return it and move the next finger in the same way, and go through all the fingers this way. make sure that none of your other fingers move. after you do it for each finger move up a string and go on. you can also mix up finger patterns, etc.
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#8
Quote by monkfunk
do lots of scales with the metronome, the reason your fingers jump high is because they don't know where they are going yet, you don't have enough control, don't worry over time, as you grow more comfortable, they will get closer


Nothing to do with not knowing a scale well enough yet, it's just a habit. And no, they won't get closer over time, not unless you consciously practice it.

Threadstarter: you need to SLOW DOWN (as in, REALLY slow down to the point of falling asleep while playing) and be aware of what your fingers are doing. The only point to get your fingers to do something fast is to tell them what to do by doing it very slowly and accurately.

So... Just play really slowly, and pay attention to all your fingers, making sure that they don't stray a lot from the fret you're supposed to be fretting next. The lower the better (while not touching of course). I have to warn you though, this is nothing for people who don't have patience. It takes a while to get your fingers to obey you.
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#9
Quote by sirpsycho85
exercise that helped me tremendously:

put all of your fingers on one string from the fifth fret to the eighth. Now move one of them to the next string without lifting the other ones at all and pick that, then return it and move the next finger in the same way, and go through all the fingers this way. make sure that none of your other fingers move. after you do it for each finger move up a string and go on. you can also mix up finger patterns, etc.

wow, this seems hard! Great excercise.
#10
Quote by Resiliance
I have to warn you though, this is nothing for people who don't have patience. It takes a while to get your fingers to obey you.

well, that about says it. since i first read this idea last night, i have been practicing extremely slow, though i have not incorporated the metronome yet (will do that today). I'm pretty disciplined (Martial Artist), so I should be ok. Thanks everyone!
Last edited by CaptainAmerica at Mar 24, 2007,