#1
b4 any1 tells me to read the lessons.. i did and i couldnt really understand like which chords sounds good together..and how do i mix like major chords to power chords and stuff liek that.. also when doing a solo in say a chord progression Em-C-D-G do i stay in like one scale or i can change scales ? soo any help? sorry for being such a noob.
Beck "Mongolian Chop Squad" the Anime inspired me to play the guitar


cloud/ red
#2
Id acually like to read the answers u get for this I wonder the same thing haha
Twirling 'round with this familiar Parabol...spinning....waving...'round each new experience
#3
to answer your first question, it really depends on your ear to determine what sounds good and what doesnt. so basically, just experiment with different combinations. if you ever need help learning how to switch between open chords, do hendrix's hey joe in open chords, which is C-G-D-A-E. 2 beats value for each chord and 2 full measures value for the E chord, try mixing up different strumming patterns.
to answer the question about changing scales with chords, you're actually supposed to. try doing a harmonic minor in A, which is the same as the minor scale except with a natural 7, a half step below the root. the chords for a 1-4-5 progression in A harmonic minor (barre chords no open chords for this exercise) are Am-Dm-E. notice that the E is major, not minor like it would be in regular A minor. if you notice, all of the notes in those chords are directly from the scale, so since the 7th interval has been sharpened a half step and it is the 3rd of the 5 chord, that 3rd has to be sharpened too. basically, get a friend, use your ear to decide which notes in the scale work best when going between those 3 chords. its not technically switching scales or keys with the chord, but it still works.
yes, i know you've probably been looking all over this reply for this answer, but yes, you can change the key of the scale you're in with the chords during a solo.

have fun, contact me if you have any big questions about this, and remember that hard work and thinking about what the **** you're playing makes you a better player
#4
eyyy lots of info.. thnx lots dude xD i still dnt quite understand the.. intervals and all that other numbers lol...but ill reread and see what i can get


oh yea and i started ta thread cuz i created a song and was wanting to add a solo..a distortion chorus to it ...

u can find the song here www.myspace.com/untalented its called Never Thought

the riffs also seemed too repetetive so i dno if i should change it or what... i dnt noe scales yet so i try to apregiate the chords instead... any advice?

( i had a post on this on the Promote your band section but i didnt get really wat i was looking for)
Beck "Mongolian Chop Squad" the Anime inspired me to play the guitar


cloud/ red
Last edited by uN-talented at Mar 24, 2007,
#5
**i did and i couldnt really understand like which chords sounds good together**

- this is all a matter of preference to ones ear. in rock music regardless of major or minor keys some basic movements would be

I-IV-V
I-V-VII
I-II-III
I-VII-VI
I-V-VI
I-VI-VIII-III
I-V-VI-IV


there are tons others these are just a very few

**and how do i mix like major chords to power chords and stuff liek that**

- well a major chord is constructed of the root, its major 3rd and its 5th, in the key of G major you have the notes and their placement as such

G - I
A - II
B - III
C - IV
D - V
E - VI
F# - VII

now you would take the I,III and V and play them together to get a G major chord which is G,B and D

now a power chord is just the root and its fifth. in this case it would be G and D. you can play a Gmajor and have a G power chord playing over it. another example would be a minor chord. A minor, in the key of A minor we have

A - I
B - II
C - III
D - IV
E - V
F - VI
G - VII

again a minor chord is created by the I, minor 3rd and V. in the case of A minor your notes would be A,C,E. Again you can layer your power chord which is the root and fifth (A and E) over this chord.

**also when doing a solo in say a chord progression Em-C-D-G do i stay in like one scale or i can change scales **

you can do both, it just depends on how you want your solo to sound. lets first examine all the notes used here

Em - E,G,B
C - C,E,G
D - D,F# A
G - G,B,D

now when we add all these notes together and remove the extras we get

E,F#,G,A,B,C,D which is E minor (you may already have known this) now given this you really (until you get more into music theory) you have 2 options. you can solo in the root key, E minor OR you can do the jazz thing and solo keys over chords, doing this will have you change your key with each chord for example over the E minor you would solo in that key ( E minor) over the C you would solo in C major, over the D in D major and over the G in G major. E minor and G major share the same grouping of notes the differences between E minor and C major is that C major has a natural F instead of an F# and D major has a C# instead of a C. hope this helped!
#7
also, going along with what everyone else said ( i havent read all of what they said, so if i end up repeating it, i apologize)
anyways:
as we know, all the chords in a major key/scale would be laid out as such
I ii iii IV V vi vii
I - tonic
ii - supertonic
iii-median
IV - subdominant
V-Dominant
vi -submediant
vii-leading tone
(the names for the chord function are the same as the function of each scale degree. also, the chord that is the vi would be called the submediant in FUNCTION, but its QUALITY is A min)

the one thing that always will be true when dealing w/ the functions of chords (how they work w/ one another) is that certain chords will want to resolve, or lead into another.
for example:
IV(subdominant) seems like the V(dominant) should be played after it, and the V tends to lead towards the I(tonic). likewise, vi wants to go to iii, and vii wants to go back to I

these are rules, and for the most part they work, but dont think that you always need to follow them, if you can find somehting that doesnt follow what i said above, and you think it sounds good, by all means, use it. but knowing how to use the functions of chords is always a good tool to have
#8
i kinda have the same question so ok u take the I III and V and u get a power chord?but how do u get a chord pregressions?
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#9
I	II	III	IV	V	VI	VII
A	Bm	C#m	D	E	F#m	G#dim

Bb	Cm	Dm	Eb	F	Gm	Adim	

B	C#m	D#m	E	F#	G#m	A#dim	

C	Dm	Em	F	G	Am	Bdim	

C#	D#m	Fm	F#	G#	A#m	Cdim

D	Em	F#m	G	A	Bm	C#dim

Eb	Fm	Gm	Ab	Bb	Cm	Ddim

E	F#m	G#m	A	B	C#m	D#dim

F	Gm	Am	Bb	C	Dm	Edim

F#	G#m	A#m	B	C#	D#m 	Fdim

G	Am	Bm	C	D	Em	F#dim

Ab	Bbm	Cm	Db	Eb	Fm	Gdim

Any help?
#10
Quote by rockintill2
i kinda have the same question so ok u take the I III and V and u get a power chord?but how do u get a chord pregressions?



a power chord has an omitted III
so its just: I - V
where as a normal triad is I-III-V
#11
Lets say i wanna write a song in the key of A.
The chords are A Bm C#m D E F#m G#dim
My question is, can i replace those chords by power chords for example (A-->A5 C#m --->C#5 G#dim ---> G#5)
Oh, and also another question, If i write a song in the key of A, which scale should i pick for the solo, once i asked my friend and he told me each key has a relative scale, and u use that scale to improvise or solo

Any help would be highly appreciated.