#1
Before you bitch yes ive checked the sticky. I just need help with them because i truely dont understand.
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#3
Touche.
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#4
thanks. but i do have a question, the I and V cadences are like the first and fifth intervals in a scale right?
To a shredder, a second is a long time.

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#6
Yeah you could say that, if it's in a major key then you would find the note from the major scale. For example in the key of C major the V would be G and if you want to build the chord off of G it would be G7, catch my drift?

The whole list in C major goes: I(Cmaj7) ii(Dmin7) iii(Emin7) IV(Fmaj7) V(G7) vi(Amin7) vii(Bmin7b5)

I kept it to 7th chords so you could catch my drift.
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#7
Quote by yawn
Not intervals, but degrees.

you know what i mean
To a shredder, a second is a long time.

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#9
Quote by Nemesis260
you know what i mean

Well, intervals aren't the same thing as degrees...


But yeah...are you all clarified?


Quote by heaven's gate
dont forget your other two cadences; imperfect and plagal
Other two...? In addition to what?
#10
Yeah we didn't really label any cadences to use.
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#11
all cadences come at the end of a phrase. a perfect candence (V-I) comes at the end of a piece, or at the end of an idea. an imperfect candence (I-V, II-V, or IV-V) comes at the end of a melody. think of beethoven's ode to joy for this one. a plagal candence (V-IV) can replace a perfect cadence if i remember correctly, also i cant remember if it's V-IV, but i know it resovles on IV. hope that makes sense.
#12
^ As far as my knowledge goes, those aren't correct :-/

An authentic cadence goes from V to I or v to i (or V to i, in the case of harmonic minor).

It's a perfect authentic cadence when both chords are in root position and the highest note of the concluding I or i chord is the tonic. If at least one of the chords is in inversion, or the tonic isn't the highest note of the concluding I or i chord, then it's imperfect.

A deceptive cadence is a progression from V or v to any other chord other than I or i, usually a VI.

A half cadence ends on V or v.

A plagal cadence is IV to I.
#13
I'm almost positive all of that is correct, yawn.
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#14
Quote by yawn
^ As far as my knowledge goes, those aren't correct :-/

An authentic cadence goes from V to I or v to i (or V to i, in the case of harmonic minor).

It's a perfect authentic cadence when both chords are in root position and the highest note of the concluding I or i chord is the tonic. If at least one of the chords is in inversion, or the tonic isn't the highest note of the concluding I or i chord, then it's imperfect.

A deceptive cadence is a progression from V or v to any other chord other than I or i, usually a VI.

A half cadence ends on V or v.

A plagal cadence is IV to I.

the perfect cadence chords can be in any inversion, as long as it is V-I. an imperfect candence (or half close) is ALWAYS I-V, II-V, or IV-V. and yes i was wrong about plagal, it is IV-I.
#15
^ If a progression ends on V, I'm pretty sure it's a half cadence...


And, I still stand by my assertion that perfect authentic cadences must involve root chords


Edit: Hm...I noticed you called your imperfect cadence a "half close"; I agree with that - in which case we'd just be differing by terminology. But I'm pretty sure an imperfect cadence is something different from a "half close" :-/
#16
Quote by yawn
^ If a progression ends on V, I'm pretty sure it's a half cadence...


And, I still stand by my assertion that perfect authentic cadences must involve root chords

half close, half cadence, whatever you wanna call it. perfect cadence chords DO NOT have to be in root position. they can be any inversion. and root chords? do you mean tonic chords?

edit: saw your edit, but i have nothing new to say
#17
Quote by heaven's gate
half close, half cadence, whatever you wanna call it. perfect cadence chords DO NOT have to be in root position. they can be any inversion. and root chords? do you mean tonic chords?
Well, both my AP music theory teacher (who has been a musician for nearly fifty years) and my music theory textbook (a very good one) declare that a perfect authentic cadence is a V to I or V to i progression in which both chords must be in root position and the tonic note must be the highest sounding pitch in the tonic triad. The perfect authentic cadence becomes imperfect when either the highest sounding tone in the tonic triad is a tone other than the tonic note, the diminished vii triad is substituted for the V, and/or one or both of the chords is inverted.

Granted, we're on the internet so there's no real way to "prove" any of this (unless I were to perhaps scan my textbook, heh), but that's what I've learned and my resources are very credible.
#19
^ Music in Theory and Practice, Volume I (seventh edition), by Benward and Saker.


About one of the authors:

Quote by poop
Bruce Benward has been widely regarded as one of the most gifted music theory pedagogues since his textbooks first appeared in the 1960s, and has exerted a wide influence on the teaching of music theory both through his writings and through the generation of teachers that he taught. He recently retired from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
#21
Quote by heaven's gate
hmm. i still stand by what ive learned
Ditto