#1
I want to tune to drop B and I know how to do it. The problem is the strings. I know they get loose and I should set up my guitar with 11 gauge strings to make it work. The question is....Will I be able to play songs in standard with 11 guage strings or will it be hard. I know some songs in drop B and I like the tuning itself but I have only one main guitar and dont know if I should do it. I have 9 guage now and thought stepping it up to 11 gauge...but I just want to know if anyone plays with 11 guage strings and plays in standard tuning with ease. Like how hard is bending and other things with 11 guage strings?

thanks
#3
you wanna use 10's on drop b? goddamn, to quote the guys from in flames, that'll be like playing spider webs. i wouldn't use any less than 12s for drop b. and you CAN do standard on 12s, but you run the risk of putting undue tension on the neck, which leads to frequent and annoying intonation and truss adjustments.
#4
its really not that much harder.
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#5
your probably better off dealing with it. I think guitarists who mainly use drop B actually have guitars with a longer than normal scale length, plus the heavy gauge strings. Im not for certain, but ive heard that before. It never hurts to try though, so if you dont mind stringing possibly twice if you dislike the 11's then go for it. But if you have a tremolo bridge, i wouldnt recommend going up a gauge. I was considering raising a gauge a while back, but i have a tremolo and the guys at the guitar shop said even one gauge up would put too much tension on the trem.
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#6
I went up to 11s from 9s recently but I keep my guitar in Drop C usually. I only noticed that much of a difference for the first week or so and then it felt normal. When I tune down to Drop B though there is quite alot of string tension loss so I'm not sure if it's worth it. You'd probably have to go up to 12s like the other guy said.
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#7
i have 11s on 2 of my guitars and am in standard 99 percent of the time. I have 12s on my Epi LP, but getting 11s on that one too.
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#8
You could just step up the gauge on the low E string and leave the others alone.
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#11
Just get a 7 string.
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#12
Quote by RPGoof
Going from 9s to 11s or 12s would be a big shock... that's why I said to go up a bit slower.



Not downtuned. .12's feel about the same in B as .09's do in E.
#13
I would recommend 11's or 12's for the unwound strings (E, B, G) and 12's or 13's for the wound ones (D, A, E) but I wouldn't advise you to play with those guages in standard. Do you only have one guitar? Cos a lot of people like to have one in standard and one for other tunings...
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#14
Never play a guitar with a floyd rose in e standard with 12s
it is impossible to keep the bridge level.

I had earnie ball heavy bottom skinny tops on my ibanez and drop b was ok.. a little slack though .. i would go 11's

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#15
hi
i'm kinda new to all this and already broke one of the strings... -_-
i think i have 9-48 atm on the m100fm and a shop recommended 9-46 ernie ball hybrid slinky - is that ok if i want to play on drop b? (and standard also perhaps)
i actually tried to tune it to drop b, but found out too late that the tuner didnt have all the tones, so i messed everything up...

"New&Improved FR Setup Guide" thread is ok, even if it has somekind of forbidden links?
link
wtf is a forbidden link?? cant even link to the same forum...
Last edited by screenshot at Aug 6, 2013,
#16
Quote by screenshot
hi
i'm kinda new to all this and already broke one of the strings... -_-
i think i have 9-48 atm on the m100fm and a shop recommended 9-46 ernie ball hybrid slinky - is that ok if i want to play on drop b? (and standard also perhaps)
i actually tried to tune it to drop b, but found out too late that the tuner didnt have all the tones, so i messed everything up...

Nope, those strings are waaaay too thin for any major drop tuning. For a nice stable drop tuning that doesn't flap about, you'd need at least 12s.

Really though, for drops that big, people generally like to keep a second guitar. Necks get a little angry about tunings being switched so drastically too often.
Last edited by johnnykbop at Aug 6, 2013,
#17
Really the only way to know is to try your self, everyone has a different idea of what's acceptable gauge for a specific tuning, I like heavier strings, I use EB heavy bottom 10's for standard (10-52) and wasn't happy in drop B til I got a set of 12-60's.

pretty much going from drop B to standard with one gauge you won't be happy with the tension in one or the other and it will screw with the guitar's set up changing that much tension on the strings.
#18
Whenever people ask about taking such a dramatic jump in tuning from say E Standard to drop B on one set of strings -- here's what I say:

It's impossible. It's impossible to maintain the same feel on your guitar when changing your tuning 2 steps on the same strings. Either it will feel like rubber bands to your fingers in the lower tuning or it will feel like telephone cables in the higher tunings. Either way, your guitar will feel like a completely different instrument when you switch between tunings -- which will greatly impede your playing.

Personally, I require a "gauge up" every time I tune even 1/2 step lower. If you must have both E standard and drop B tunings available, I'd recommend getting a set of .12 -.56's MINIMUM and tune it to C# Standard (same tuning as E Standard, just every string tuned down 1 1/2 steps.) Then you can quickly drop the 6th string to B for drop B, and run a capo for E Standard. The capo would be on the 3rd fret, if I'm not mistaken.

However, you're better off getting a second guitar. I've never been a fan of using capos.
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#19
Quote by KailM
Whenever people ask about taking such a dramatic jump in tuning from say E Standard to drop B on one set of strings -- here's what I say:

It's impossible. It's impossible to maintain the same feel on your guitar when changing your tuning 2 steps on the same strings. Either it will feel like rubber bands to your fingers in the lower tuning or it will feel like telephone cables in the higher tunings. Either way, your guitar will feel like a completely different instrument when you switch between tunings -- which will greatly impede your playing.

Personally, I require a "gauge up" every time I tune even 1/2 step lower. If you must have both E standard and drop B tunings available, I'd recommend getting a set of .12 -.56's MINIMUM and tune it to C# Standard (same tuning as E Standard, just every string tuned down 1 1/2 steps.) Then you can quickly drop the 6th string to B for drop B, and run a capo for E Standard. The capo would be on the 3rd fret, if I'm not mistaken.

However, you're better off getting a second guitar. I've never been a fan of using capos.

This.

I stick to a gauge up for every full step more or less. 10's in standard, 11's in D, 12's in C. I have 10's in D right now because I got a guitar with a floyd and they were the only strings I had.

I used to play 11's in standard but I switched to 10's and have stayed there. You simply can't make big changes like that. It will feel awful and it's bad for your instrument. You'll probably just have to deal with it until you can get a second guitar.
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#20
Quote by Firewind Raging
I would recommend 11's or 12's for the unwound strings (E, B, G) and 12's or 13's for the wound ones (D, A, E)


This makes absolutely no sense what so ever...

Strings are measured in thousandths of an inch, so the numbers 11, 12, 13 etc are actually .011, .012, .013.

Telling someone to put 12's or 13's on 'the wound ones' means nothing. You can get various different sets of strings that have the high E starting in a .012 gauge but have the low E ranging from .050-.060 and probably more! So saying to use a 12 for the wound ones doesn't really help at all..

Xtremerocker390 -

Something like 11-52 or 12-54 would be fine. You can go higher if you want, but you don't have to. I play these gauges in drop B just fine.

I would recommend swapping out the G string for a wound alternative as the plain string sounds terrible normally.
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Last edited by gbh14 at Aug 6, 2013,
#21
Quote by gbh14
This makes absolutely no sense what so ever...

Strings are measured in thousandths of an inch, so the numbers 11, 12, 13 etc are actually .011, .012, .013.

Telling someone to put 12's or 13's on 'the wound ones' means nothing. You can get various different sets of strings that have the high E starting in a .012 gauge but have the low E ranging from .050-.060 and probably more! So saying to use a 12 for the wound ones doesn't really help at all..

Xtremerocker390 -

Something like 11-52 or 12-54 would be fine. You can go higher if you want, but you don't have to. I play these gauges in drop B just fine.

I would recommend swapping out the G string for a wound alternative as the plain string sounds terrible normally.

I knew exactly what they meant. It's not complicated at all.
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#22
Quote by BladeSlinger
I knew exactly what they meant. It's not complicated at all.


String gauges are not complicated at all, your right.

What is wrong though is when people talk about the bottom E string as 11's or 12's.

Simply saying use 11's could mean 11-49, 11-50, 11-52, 11-54, 11-56. So telling someone to buy 11's for drop B tuning, and them buying 11-49, they probably aren't going to get on that well..
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#23
Drop B is only C# tuning with the C# down a step, and I can easily do the C# with 10-46; the dropped B will just be really bendy. If you don't like the bendiness of the B (I do), you could get 10-52.
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#24
Quote by gbh14
String gauges are not complicated at all, your right.

What is wrong though is when people talk about the bottom E string as 11's or 12's.

Simply saying use 11's could mean 11-49, 11-50, 11-52, 11-54, 11-56. So telling someone to buy 11's for drop B tuning, and them buying 11-49, they probably aren't going to get on that well..

11-50 is assumed.


I see what you're saying but it really isn't that big of a deal.
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Last edited by BladeSlinger at Aug 6, 2013,
#25
Quote by johnnykbop
Nope, those strings are waaaay too thin for any major drop tuning. For a nice stable drop tuning that doesn't flap about, you'd need at least 12s.

Really though, for drops that big, people generally like to keep a second guitar. Necks get a little angry about tunings being switched so drastically too often.


Quote by jaymz9350
Really the only way to know is to try your self, everyone has a different idea of what's acceptable gauge for a specific tuning, I like heavier strings, I use EB heavy bottom 10's for standard (10-52) and wasn't happy in drop B til I got a set of 12-60's.

pretty much going from drop B to standard with one gauge you won't be happy with the tension in one or the other and it will screw with the guitar's set up changing that much tension on the strings.


ok thanks. which one of these tho?

ERNIE BALL COATED SLINKY ELECTRIC 12-56, 3126
12, 16, 24p, 32, 44, 56
ERNIE BALL COBALT NOT EVEN SLINKY 12-56, 2726
12, 16, 24p, 32, 44, 56
ERNIE BALL NOT EVEN SLINKY 12-56, 2626
12, 16, 24p, 32, 44, 56

11s:
ERNIE BALL COBALT BEEFY SLINKY 11-54, 2727
11, 15, 22, 30, 42, 54

if i replace the strings 1by1, it would be fairly simple?
i think i also looked only EB strings... is there any other good make?
Last edited by screenshot at Aug 7, 2013,
#26
I use the regular not even slinkys for Drop C though I would recommend picking up a wound 24 to replace the 24p as that's just too big for a plain sting in my opinion and I found it just didn't sound right.
#27
Quote by screenshot
if i replace the strings 1by1, it would be fairly simple?
i think i also looked only EB strings... is there any other good make?


You can also look at D'Addario. Those are pretty much the main 2 brands. The "cobalt" and "coated" are just fancy expensive versions of regular sets, don't bother with the extra money unless you can find a good reason.

If your guitar has a floating trem, 1 by 1 would be very much recommended.
Last edited by johnnykbop at Aug 7, 2013,
#28
Quote by Xtremerocker390
I want to tune to drop B and I know how to do it. The problem is the strings. I know they get loose


Okay, the second best thing to do is to get a guitar with a long scale and dedicate it to Drop B. A guitar with a 24.75" scale is definitely NOT going to be your best choice; I'd buy something with a 27" or 28" scale (most of these are listed as "baritones" in their sales literature. In the US, Agile has both 27" and 30" scale guitars in several shapes and sizes. The AL-627 is a LP type guitar listing for $479 that has a 27" scale, 24 fret board, 14" radius, ebony fretboard, tusq nut, Graphtech NSV2 bridge with String Saver saddles, etc.and available in several finishes :

http://www.rondomusic.com/AL627flatblk.html



The Interceptor Pro 630 is still a six-string (Agile has Interceptors up to 8 or 10 strings, I think), but has a 30" scale (also available in several finishes) for about $699 (and notice that it's neck-through construction:

http://www.rondomusic.com/interceptorpro630tred.html



And then there's the Agile Argus 630 extended (30" scale) guitar for around $430:

http://www.rondomusic.com/argustoastsg.html



Interesting, regarding the discussion of string gauges. This one is designed to intonate probably with the following gauges:24 34 44 56 72 84 gauge strings. Ouch.

This is a YouTube of an Agile Interceptor Pro 727 (7-string version, 27" scale). Dunno how applicable this is, but you can decide.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPxshxalKFg

And Keith Merrow doing his thing with an Agile:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ3dV1TGE7c
Last edited by dspellman at Aug 7, 2013,
#29
Okay, that was the *second* best thing.

The first best thing is to buy a Variax JTV-89F.
http://line6.com/jtv-89f/features



It does drop tunings via pitch replacement technology. Simply rotate the dial and you get drop tunings down to Drop Bb, instantly. The tension on the strings never changes and you can be back at E standard literally within an instant.