#2
just use a scale in g, the minor pentatonic always works.
Quote by happytimeharry
ig·no·rant

1. Lacking education or knowledge.
2. Showing or arising from a lack of education or knowledge: an ignorant mistake.
3. Unaware or uninformed.

also see: elitist asshat
#3
you dont have to worry about the G# in the E, because you can just use the E note in the G scale when the E chord comes along.
#4
Quote by atc228
just use a scale in g, the minor pentatonic always works.


Agreed.
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#5
depends on the type of song that you're doing... if you're doing a rock stay with a G pentatonic scale, but otherwise use the usual major and minor scales. Obviously in the right key, but ya
#7
Sounds like E pentatonic to me. that progression goes E G A if you change the start point which to me is an E minor pentatonic riff.
#9
Use an Em scale over a E major chord? wouldn't that clash a bit, unless you're goingfor some chromatic effect?
#10
Quote by Harwood
Use an Em scale over a E major chord? wouldn't that clash a bit, unless you're goingfor some chromatic effect?
Not really. It will give a bluesy sound. It's actually very common.
#11
Quote by Harwood
Use an Em scale over a E major chord? wouldn't that clash a bit, unless you're goingfor some chromatic effect?
Well, you might wanna stick to Em pentatonic, but it is a pretty common blues/blues-rock thang. The problem is that the song doesn't stick to one key, so you have comprimise somewhere.