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#1
ive been playin the guitar for about a year and a half and ive been noticeing that my right palm tends to rest near the bridge pickup of the guitar or my right pinky is always touching the guitar... however when i look at really good guitarists they dont touch it at all...... do i have a bad habit, will it effect my playing, or is it nothing to worry about?
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#2
no it will only effect u wen playing fast, but everyone does it at some point. ur pick position matters more
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#3
I hope it isn't a bad habit, since I've been playing just a bit longer....almost 2 years....and I do the same exact thing with resting my hand on the guitar near the bridge pickup.
#4
Slash does. When picking anyway
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#6
uh oh...another anchoring vs. non anchoring thread

ok, anchoring is helpful when you first start out as a way to develop a sense of where the strings are in relation to your hand...but once you have that, you shouldn't anchor

first of all, anchoring will eventually lead to a roadblock in your practicing when you reach a certain speed...at this block, you will find it impossible to increase your speed without creating excess tension - this tension can create problems down the road, and it will also take WAY more practice to get used to then if you had none at all

on the other hand, let's say you stop anchoring...this leaves your hand perfectly free and not nailed to one particular point on the guitar, giving you freedom in your picking hand - this, as you'll probably notice, will allow you to skip strings much easier and more efficiently than if you were anchored...and as for palm muting, since your hand doesn't have a reference point, you can place your palm anywhere on the strings, thus giving you more flexibility

of course, you can't expect to switch overnight, if you do decide to...it took me many hours of practice to reach the same speed as i had when i anchored, but it was worth it...you can feel the tension slip away and makes playing much easier
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#7
That was a great post axe grinder. Thank You
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#8
Definitely big thanks on that post. I'll have to take my time and pull myself away from anchoring...thank you!
#11
Well personally, I rest the side of my hand against the bridge, but don't rest my pinky on the body. I've tried resting my pinky on the body, but it never felt comfortable. Sometimes, I won't rest my hand against the body, but it gets uncomfy not having something there after a while.

I don't aim to play very fast, so I'm not really worried about my speed as of yet...
#12
my picking hand has always moved all over. Its as free as the left hand.
#13
So can you rest your hand agaisnt the bridge? i have to or else my arm gets tired after a while.
#14
Quote by NotAJock2Day
Nobody cares, it's still a bad habit.


Actually I care, because since Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix even Eric Calapton do it, it can't be that bad a thing to do.
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#15
Quote by jimi_sean
Actually I care, because since Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix even Eric Calapton do it, it can't be that bad a thing to do.


So tell me, how would restricting the movement of your hand be beneficial to your playing? Jimi Hendrix wasn't great in a technically sense and Page/Clapton are always overrated. We're talking about picking technique here, not overall ability anyway. Anchoring is a bad habit, and the only half decent excuse people have is that it helps them know where the strings are. Nobody instantly knows where the strings are when they start playing, but those who play unanchored actually learn to feel where the strings are and control their technique. Anchorers are also at higher risk for carpal tunnel also, keep it up.
#16
Quote by NotAJock2Day
So tell me, how would restricting the movement of your hand be beneficial to your playing? Jimi Hendrix wasn't great in a technically sense and Page/Clapton are always overrated. We're talking about picking technique here, not overall ability anyway. Anchoring is a bad habit, and the only half decent excuse people have is that it helps them know where the strings are. Nobody instantly knows where the strings are when they start playing, but those who play unanchored actually learn to feel where the strings are and control their technique. Anchorers are also at higher risk for carpal tunnel also, keep it up.


its all preference man. if they would rather anchor, and it feels more comfortable to them, let them. I know what you're saying about playing unanchored, and I personally have changed my ways and am playing that way. i have been for about three months, and the benefits are there. Still, let them play how they want. no need to bash'em about it.
its all preference
#17
I actually completely agree with what you are saying, being a person who has played unanchored for years, but saying this -

Quote by NotAJock2Day
Jimi Hendrix wasn't great in a technically sense and Page/Clapton are always overrated.


LMAO, Is that really the best you've got to argument what I said. Unfortunatley that ranks in the most dumb things I have ever read.
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#18
Quote by jimi_sean
I actually completely agree with what you are saying, being a person who has played unanchored for years, but saying this -


LMAO, Is that really the best you've got to argument what I said. Unfortunatley that ranks in the most dumb things I have ever read.


thats what i mean. its all preference. theres no need to bash a person if they dont. and there really is no need to insult people heros for not playing un anchored
#19
Petrucci anchors.... just putting that out there,

Anyways I stopped doing it early in my playing and i'm gald I did, when you first stop anchoring it seems wicked tough but in time you'll get used t it and feel greater speed.
#20
I've been playing some today with my hand just resting on the bridge no pinky and my hand not resting on anything, and i find it puts a lot more tension on my wrist. i'll have to see what my teacher says though because i think he anchors (i cant remember) and he is an amazing player, so you never know. espically if petrucci anchors like that one guy says.
#21
I wanna get into a Jimi Hendrix debate on whether he was actually that amazing or not...but I'll stay on topic.

Ya...I just had my first practice doing un-anchored. My hand feels soooo much better than it normally does after practice...even though it might be because I'm going so freakin' slow trying to re-learn, but it should come back quick...I hope.

So, now instead of talking about pros/cons, since it has been discussed, who here does which way?
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#22
So resting my picking hand on the bridge of my guitar is a bad thing? But it helps in palm muting...and it feels kinda weird to play the guitar without my picking hand resting on the bridge.
#23
Quote by Uphill_Battle
So resting my picking hand on the bridge of my guitar is a bad thing? But it helps in palm muting...and it feels kinda weird to play the guitar without my picking hand resting on the bridge.

yeah really. Im left handed and play righty, and im just not able to use my hand just floating out there.
#24
Quote by Sins_&_Shadows
its all preference man. if they would rather anchor, and it feels more comfortable to them, let them.


No one's making anyone DO anything. It's called offerring advice.

And anyone who thinks its preference prior to learning good arm control (which is
probably most reading this) is kidding themselves. In another sense, Playing
better or playing worse is also preference, whether you realize it or not.
#25
Quote by edg
No one's making anyone DO anything. It's called offerring advice.

And anyone who thinks its preference prior to learning good arm control (which is
probably most reading this) is kidding themselves. In another sense, Playing
better or playing worse is also preference, whether you realize it or not.



taking advice is also preference, just to point that out.
if someone doesnt want to listen to it, who are you to give them hell about it?
#26
Well, I asked my guitar teacher today, and I was right he does anchor his pinky. He told me it doesn't hinder him at all, and he is an incredibly proficent player. Apparently Randy Rhoads also anchored, as well as several other incredibly skilled guitarists he mentioned to me. I forget the other names, but one was the guitarist for steely dan, and a megadeth guitarist who he forgot the name of. As well as John Petrucci, who someone else mentioned. So I really think it's a preference thing.
#27
Blah blah blah. Yes, the same old tired arguments. So and so does it....

Anchor if you really feel its preference.

I'll leave you with some quotes on the topic from someone who is
BOTH a master player and teacher. I think he makes the point well and those
that read and can think for themsleves can make up thier own minds.

>Among those things you must do is to keep your hand free to
>move without any anchoring. You need to MUTE with your wrist
>area when playing overdriven guitar..or when using the mutola
>technique ,,,,but that is not anchoring for stability.
>
> The stability comes from your entirer forearm control...which
>is demanding and which most players bypass by using the pinkie
>or the fingers on the pickguard,,,,,,,,I understand why....I
>did it too as a beginner but I realised after a month of it
>what the ramifications woiuld be and I stopped doing that.
>
>To give you an idea...I have started to develop my fingerstyle
> classical tremolo but this time with a pick only......so I
>have to pick 3notes on the high E string and one on the low E,
>low A, low D, G...B.......just like flamenco and classical.
>Now thay sort of thing cant be done with immobilizing methods
>.....you have to be free.
>
>You can play lots of great music with a partially
>immobilised hand and be very happy. But since I have
>boundless right hand technique ..my duty is to show others how
>to have it as well.... not limiting ways...why?....because I
>dont know how far anyione wants to go 5 years from
>now.....they may want to play jazz or be able to play at
>Yngwie's level....and they mustt be free to do so if they
>chose to and not have to start all over again.
>
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

>When I started I did rest my pinky.
>
>I soon realized that it was going to limit me and I stopped that
>bad habit.
>
>You can do anything with enough work and that is what you see
>when you see MARTIN TAYLOR OR PETRUCCI at work,,,, but they
>had to practice much more and much longer to make that work
>for them....do you want to have to work so much more or spend
>the time playing music instead???
>
>These players play inspite that handicap.
>
>MARTIN TAYLOR AND GEORGE BENSON are two players who have
>stated in print that they would not rest the pinky and hold
>the pick Benson style if they couid star over. They wouild be
>playng even more complex than now.
>
>The absolute grand masters like JOHN MC LAUGHLIN AL DI MEOLA,
>SHAWN LANE,JIMMY BRUNO etc..dont rest anything for a
>reason..total freedom.and they play acoustic as well.You cant
>play acoustic with right hand crutches and play at the world
>class level.
>

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

>Your right arm should float. No right hand anchoring.
>
>Anchoring is tension inducing and good enough for you to play
>backing basic simple lead guitar for SHANIA TWAIN or THE
>PUSYICAT DOLLS or AVRIL LAVIGNE in the studio or on the road.
>Most rock bands with 2,5 years off career life also have very
>simple physical demands before they fade away due to a variety
>of factors having nothing to do with how fast and furious they
>play or dont play.
>
>That type of playing is quite tolerant of all sorts of poor
>habits and bad technique overall because the music is not very
>fast and the dynamics are moderate.
>
>Now if you want to play styles that are physically demanding
>like bluegrass, some rock, jazz, classical , you will be left
>in the dust or get injured, or plateau forever (unless you
>retrain yourself) if you use the form and technique of those
>players whose style is not very demanding.
>
>
>
>Therefore I prepare all my students to be absolute virtuosos
>in case they care to become one in the future or even right
>right now.If they stay with slow and simple music they will
>still be able to play much better and more musically (due to
>not having to fight with bad form and tension) than their
>counterparts with bad habits.
>
>
>
>Now off course, most of you are not my students and I could
>just say go ahead do whatever "feels good" in the beginning
>but
> what "feells good "to the inexperienced player will prove
>to be a nightmare riddled with physical pain and injury when
>you face demanding music.
#28
everyone hase their own playing style and if you are comefortable and are sounding good you have nothing to worry about
#29
Well obviously you don't anchor all the time, if I play finger style music i don't anchor at all. Seriously, I never feel tension in my wrist while i rest it on the bridge, but when i don't after only a minute or two of playing slowly i feel a lot of tension in my wrist. Look, I already said there are several incredibly proficient players who do anchor, so I really don't think you can make a general assumption like that. Heck, he even said a lot of his teachers at the musician's institute in hollywood did too.
#31
Quote by Spamwise
yeah really. Im left handed and play righty, and im just not able to use my hand just floating out there.

You're just lazy. If you practice playing unanchored you will get good at it, just like anyone else. I am also left-handed but play righty and I don't use that as an excuse to be mediocre.
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#32
Quote by Spamwise
Well obviously you don't anchor all the time, if I play finger style music i don't anchor at all. Seriously, I never feel tension in my wrist while i rest it on the bridge, but when i don't after only a minute or two of playing slowly i feel a lot of tension in my wrist. Look, I already said there are several incredibly proficient players who do anchor, so I really don't think you can make a general assumption like that. Heck, he even said a lot of his teachers at the musician's institute in hollywood did too.


I can understand why it appears that there are good players who appear to anchor
and why you shouldn't, but I won't belabor the point.

About teachers I have an interesting story:

After 10-15 years of being self-taught I tried lessons. I hooked up with a teacher
who was a very good player. VERY good -- she now has several CDs out and records
on Steve Vai's Jazz label. After about a year and a half of lessons, guess how
much I learned from her? 0. Zilch. Nothing. Looking back on it she let me sit
there playing with the worst habits imaginable and never said a peep about it.
Basically the usual "song a week" method of instruction. Great player. Terrible
teacher. So, you can be the greatest player in the world, but have no clue how
to convey the skill to someone else. I'm thinking this is very common. Getting a
really good teacher is pretty rare.
#33
edg,
Really nice story but you forgot to mention who actually said all of that. For all we know it could be someone that's never even picked up a guitar.
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#35
i always anchor my hand and i've never had any trouble getting speed with alternate or economy picking
#36
Oh, so you're the one that's
Quote by edg
BOTH a master player and teacher.



Are you modest aswell. Only jokin' mate. I did quite enjoy the read.
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#37
Quote by jimi_sean
Oh, so you're the one that's



Are you modest aswell. Only jokin' mate. I did quite enjoy the read.


Oh ha.

No, those quotes were not mine. They are from this guy: http://www.neymello.com/
Who also moderates the forums at Guitar Principles which is where I clipped some
of his replies about anchoring.
#38
Quote by fendabenda
Petrucci anchors.... just putting that out there,

Anyways I stopped doing it early in my playing and i'm gald I did, when you first stop anchoring it seems wicked tough but in time you'll get used t it and feel greater speed.



really?
im almost positive he doesnt?

cause how in gods name does he sweep the glass prison if he anchors

plus he went to berklee, im sure they pounded it out of him then
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#39
to be fair, edg is an amazing player

anywho, these threads always end with the same old "well, petrucci and batio anchor, so it must be fine" - like stated earlier, it is preference

this can be compared to hammering a nail - let's say when you first hammer a nail, you use your hand...no hammer, just your palm...many would argue that this is the wrong way to do it, but hey, it feels comfortable - and yes, there is an easier way to do it (hammer), but oh well...now, this person is eventually going to be able to reach the same effiency as a hammer after hours of slamming nails with his hand

does this mean it's the most efficient way? not at all

basically what i'm saying is that not everyone needs precise technical prowess to excel in their style of music...and also, some players have been doing it for so long that it's just second nature...let's take petrucci, one of the finest players ever, into account - he anchors, but reaches blistering speeds...however, if you'll notice (and i have, with the countless dvd's and actually seeing him live up close) that he is exploding with tension when he plays...his arm is tensed up to the point of being like a piece of wood and his face is distorted with discomfort...may be a bit of an exaggeration, but he still has excess tension that wouldn't be there if he played unanchored - however, contrary to popular belief, petrucci doesn't anchor exclusively

let's look at paul gilbert, one of the fastest alternate pickers alive...if you'll watch him play, you'll notice absolutely NO tension...he actually smiles and can talk to people while playing at speeds that many can only dream of, with his arm looking like it's just hanging freely with no tension...why is that? i'd say the fact that he doesn't anchor

and of course, michael angelo batio, probably THE fastest alternate picker alive...he anchors, but if you'll notice, he's mastered a technique called oscillatory picking, a wrist motion that uses a completely different muscle in the forearm then standard translation picking...the anchoring is virtually irrelevant with this technique

just a tidbit of information, shawn lane, THE fastest alternate picker ever, didn't anchor and used oscillation picking
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Last edited by axe_grinder247 at Apr 3, 2007,
#40
Quote by edg
I can understand why it appears that there are good players who appear to anchor
and why you shouldn't, but I won't belabor the point.

About teachers I have an interesting story:

After 10-15 years of being self-taught I tried lessons. I hooked up with a teacher
who was a very good player. VERY good -- she now has several CDs out and records
on Steve Vai's Jazz label. After about a year and a half of lessons, guess how
much I learned from her? 0. Zilch. Nothing. Looking back on it she let me sit
there playing with the worst habits imaginable and never said a peep about it.
Basically the usual "song a week" method of instruction. Great player. Terrible
teacher. So, you can be the greatest player in the world, but have no clue how
to convey the skill to someone else. I'm thinking this is very common. Getting a
really good teacher is pretty rare.


Just out of curiosity... Who is this player? Mimi Fox?
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
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