#1
I've been playing guitar for about 5 years now and I started on a little, and I mean little, acoustic guitar that came out of a starter pack (a very good value I might add) called Abilene. It didn't even have a model number because it was simply too low-range. Now, it's been five years and I've spent most of my money on my electric guitar (A Dean Hardtail with Gibson '57 pickups and a Behringer 212 Combo Amp with a GNX Digitech Guitar Workstation). Obviously that money added up and I've been wanting to pay attentions to the smaller, more neglected acoustic end of my growing collection.

Well, I have a string of coffee house shows this summer and I'll be definitely willing to upgrade my acoustic and relatively cheaply too--college is next year, ya. Well, I've nailed it down to two choices but before I give them let me tell you a little about my style.

I adopted some licks by Chet Atkins and Steve Howe (my idols) but still retain that folky feel of The Decemberists or Mostly Autumn (maybe even some Fleetwood Mac) and I imploy a lot of picking techniques as well as classical sweeps and country-chords which is why I decided on a Spruce or Ceder top for the volume. The two guitars that follow have Spruce tops. Here are my choices:

Alvarez RF8 Avoustic Guitar with Hardshell Case (The Hardshell case was appealing)

or...

Jasmine Takamine S34C Acoustic Guitar (It looks so beautiful, though cheap, and has mohogany sides and back for more volume)

You help me decide folks and I'll tell you what I go for!

Thanks much,
Calamity_Daemon
I wake to sleep
and I take my waking slow
I feel my fate in what I cannot fear
I learn by going where I have to go
#2
Don't get either as neither appear to be solid tops. Those guitars will sound dead in a couple years whereas a solid top will sound better over the years. Look at the Washburn D10S or The Yamaha FG series.
#3
Quote by soundcheck1
Don't get either as neither appear to be solid tops. Those guitars will sound dead in a couple years whereas a solid top will sound better over the years. Look at the Washburn D10S or The Yamaha FG series.


I'm guessing that a solid top makes for sustained resonance within the wood? I admit my acoustical knowledge isn't very vast right now. I just made do with what I had.
I'll look at these for sure. Any other suggestions?
I wake to sleep
and I take my waking slow
I feel my fate in what I cannot fear
I learn by going where I have to go
Last edited by Calamity_Daemon at Mar 25, 2007,
#5
Man that Art And Lutherie is gorgeous. Now I'm torn between that and the Washburn D10S. For my purposes what would you suggest? I'm leaning towards the cheap and accessible Lutherie but the Washburn has a case (which I hate paying for).
I wake to sleep
and I take my waking slow
I feel my fate in what I cannot fear
I learn by going where I have to go
#6
either guitar would be well-suited for your needs. you mentioned that the a&l was accessible... go and play one and let your ears and hands decide for you!
#7
ive got the d10s 12 string and it sounds quite good (i did play the 6 string while looking for my 12string) so i would you for the washburn, but i may be a bit bias
#8
A&L are very nice guitars for the money. I prefer them over most of the Washburn's I've played. Another to consider, Acoustic Guitar magazine recently gave a very positive review of a Walden G570TB. If you see one of those give it a try. About $250. It's got a solid cedar top and laminated 'hog sides.