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#1
I'm not a fan of emo music. I've heard a lot of people label it as punk, saying that it is derived from a mid-80's form of hardcore punk, labeled 'emotive harcore'. And though I have a recollection of a few Northeastern band from the early 80's which could be the inspiration for emo, I'm not so sure I would consider it 'punk' myself, yet genres confuse the hell out of me, considering they are so vague. Well, to my question: Why do you fans like emo music? This is not meant to be derogatory or demeaning in anyway, it is just a common query. Why is it that you connect with the lyrical content of 'emo'? What bands do you fans consider emo?

Another thought. I have often run across articles describing the 'emo' scene. I've always thought scenes to be very limiting and close-minded, but that is just my preference/opinion. Well, I would just like to know the basic of the typical 'emo' scene, and how most..... well whatever you diehard fans of emo call yourselves, how most of you see yourselves in other's eyes.

One last question: I'm pretty sure 'emo' fans are pretty apathetic about philosophy and politics, but I am not positive. If I am wrong, what are the majority of 'emo' fans' belief's concerning politics and philosophical theories, if any?


I'm just interested in learning about different genres of music, wether they be of my personal preference or not. This is not an insult, so please don't take offense to this thread. And if you must take offense, don't spend time insulting or trying to belittle me, because the only way in which this will effect my feelings will be me assuming that most 'emo' fans are way too emotional for their own good, and I really don't want to join the oth 65% of the population and believe this. I'm trying to be open-minded and learn to appreciate and respect your genre. Keep that in mind.


Peace

- Jon
#2
Go wiki up Fugazi.

Then go listen to their music.

People misintereptated the term, and that's why it's used throughout modern Pop Punk, reguardless of it having no reference to where it came from or what real emo sounds like.
#3
^ ur not sayin fugazi ar "emo" ar u? cuz their not.

by the by, 2 the poster, i think Rites of Spring are a band credited w/ an early "emo" influence.Guy Picciotto played guitar 4 em, and later fugazi. tho neither were "emo", just sayin, if ur wonderin, they can b somewhat traced to modern day "Emo" influence
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Last edited by Eddy Hitler at Apr 29, 2007,
#4
I don't really understand what you're asking.

You could try the Emo Essentials for a list of emo bands and stuff.

Maybe I'm just tired but I don't understand the concept of this thread. I'm gonna leave it open for a while and see what happens, but if there's too much spam or flaming then I'll close it.
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#5
Quote by Craigo
Go wiki up Fugazi.

Then go listen to their music.

People misintereptated the term, and that's why it's used throughout modern Pop Punk, reguardless of it having no reference to where it came from or what real emo sounds like.


I know who Fugazi is, I'm not a child. I'm just trying to understand the 'scene' and why this music has become so popular. It seems something went right over my head.
#6
I don't know why people are closed-minded personally. Emo's just as much of a genre as punk, rock, metal ect. I think its because they cant see the real meaning behind the music and think its all whining.

Quote by E V H 5150
Who really cares about emo? They all just sit in the corners alone anyway...

perfect example of a closed-minded person.
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#7
Quote by Craigo
Go wiki up Fugazi.

Then go listen to their music.

People misintereptated the term, and that's why it's used throughout modern Pop Punk, reguardless of it having no reference to where it came from or what real emo sounds like.


Fugazi was never considered emotive hardcore. Ian's other band Embrace was. And Guy's Rites of Spring, which Ian produced.

Anyway, it's not so much that I don't understand Emo music that I dislike it. Or because I don't consider it music, it's that after the nineties, which was full of truly miserable people, who would talk about real problems, the musicians of today seem like they're just doing it because it's what you're supposed to sing about now, and it doesn't come off as soulful as people like Layne Staley were doing it. I also have a hard time taking the music itself seriously, because the artists seemed to not take their instruments seriously, not learning the geography of their fretboards, if you will. Simple music doesn't bother me, but the musicians who play guitar now don't really seem to have a passion for it. Though, I'm sure some do. I've always felt music was about passion, which is why I could always overlook a lot of the things Ian McKaye was doing, or Patti Smith, even though it's simple: You can really feel the emotion and passion they're conveying. And it was at a time, when not everybody was doing what they were, so it doesn't seem like an act.
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#8
Quote by Seth Shadows
I don't know why people are closed-minded personally. Emo's just as much of a genre as punk, rock, metal ect. I think its because they cant see the real meaning behind the music and think its all whining.


perfect example of a closed-minded person.



Well, what is the real meaning?
#9
threadstarter: i dont think emo in its truest sense is popular. i think the word is popular.

i know the history of the genre fairly well, but i only listen to one or two early bands so i dont know much about the early lyrical content as such apart from what ive read. for me, i relate much more to personal lyrics, and im sure that it derived from punk in the way that a lot of the early bands were DIY in spirit, and whereas the lyrics of punk were outwardly aggressive and confrontational, emo was supposed to be an inwards reflection of this to counteract it. i might be wrong, this is what i understand to be vaguely true.

i dont think you can generalise a whole group of people or fans of a music genre into political or philosophical categories. the 'metal' stereotype is of long haired guys who hate religion and sacrifice goats. which clearly isnt true, because there are a lot of christian metal bands. the attitudes of emo fans are as varied as any collection of people you'd find in life.
#10
Quote by vegasklinik
Well, what is the real meaning?

There's multiple meanings to all music... even Rap. Just because more music is emotional then others doesn't mean that It's bad. It's just the issues it protrays. Emo can be alot. lets look at lyrics (which is basically the core of all emo-music. Apparently) compared to a band called "Hawthorne Heights". They Put most of their work into the lyrics. All Their pain and suffering goes into it... uhh nevermind, off topic. But asking the real meaning behind music is something you'll never get until you figure it out for yourself.
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#11
Fugazi are pretty emotional, but they're a post-hardcore band, bands like Dag Nasty, Embrace and Sunny Day Real Estate are often credited as being progenitors of emo. Husker Du's Zen Arcade is also credited as the first 'Emo' album.
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#12
Quote by Eddy Hitler
^ ur not sayin fugazi ar "emo" ar u? cuz their not.

by the by, 2 the poster, i think Rites of Spring are a band credited w/ an early "emo" influence.Guy Picciotto played guitar 4 em, and later fugazi. tho neither were "emo", just sayin, if ur wonderin, they can b somewhat traced to modern day "Emo" influence

Fugazi are the original emo band, dude.

Emo is very misinterpreted. It is not a person, and it's not a fashion statement (it's a ****ing deathwish, lol, MCR ain't emo, but that made me have to say it), but it is a style of music. People and clothing styles and haircuts are not emo, but should be called scene, which often the terms are misused. Emo is a style of music. That also is misused, cause most people can't think of any real emo bands. Everyone says emo will die in 2007, and it never was big. The only modern pop-punk band that is really emo that got famous is Hawthorne Heights. Emo is like Fugazi, or maybe Jimmy Eat World.

^Yea, Husker Du is early emo.
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#13
Wait, are you asking for a definition of emo, why we like it, or why it's popular?

I'm confused.
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#14
Quote by Seth Shadows
There's multiple meanings to all music... even Rap. Just because more music is emotional then others doesn't mean that It's bad. It's just the issues it protrays. Emo can be alot. lets look at lyrics (which is basically the core of all emo-music. Apparently) compared to a band called "Hawthorne Heights". They Put most of their work into the lyrics. All Their pain and suffering goes into it... uhh nevermind, off topic. But asking the real meaning behind music is something you'll never get until you figure it out for yourself.



I like that brother, I was hoping to hear something of that nature.

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#15
Quote by Gibson_SG_uzr55
^Yea, Husker Du is early emo.

Husker Du aren't emo, Zen Arcade however had some 'Emo' moments, and has been stated as an influence by many early Emo Bands.
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#16
Calling Husker Du emo is like saying the Smashing Pumpkins are emo.
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#17
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Calling Husker Du emo is like saying the Smashing Pumpkins are emo.


Husker Du was very influential to the molding of the original "emo" band, that is if you understand what emo is supposed to be, not what it is being called today.

TS, I think you're being very ignorant whether or not you realize it. An emo fan, much like a metal, classic rock, or punk fan can have varying degrees of care for social and political issues. They're people, you can't label the entire group to have one train of thought. It's just stupid to even think that. The same goes for liking the modern "emo" music. Some people will connect with it because it's "hip" or "in" to like the scene. Some will connect with it because they generally like the music. You may feel that "emo" bands of today aren't passionate, and I'll agree that some bands just seem to be doing it because it's "hip" or "in". Those are usually the type of bands scene kids love, not to say that scene kids don't like the bands that you can connect with. A good example of a modern band that's often labeled emo that seems very passionate: Brand New. Listen to these guys, the instrumentation is simple for the majority of the songs, but they're is definitely more emotion in every song than most songs being made today. There are many bands like Brand New on the "emo" scene today that are genuinely passionate about the music they make.
Last edited by NGD1313 at Apr 29, 2007,
#18
Maybe what I said about Husker Du came out wrong. I meant what the guy above me said.
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#20
Quote by NGD1313
Husker Du was very influential to the molding of the original "emo" band, that is if you understand what emo is supposed to be, not what it is being called today.

TS, I think you're being very ignorant whether or not you realize it. An emo fan, much like a metal, classic rock, or punk fan can have varying degrees of care for social and political issues. They're people, you can't label the entire group to have one train of thought. It's just stupid to even think that. The same goes for liking the modern "emo" music. Some people will connect with it because it's "hip" or "in" to like the scene. Some will connect with it because they generally like the music. You may feel that "emo" bands of today aren't passionate, and I'll agree that some bands just seem to be doing it because it's "hip" or "in". Those are usually the type of bands scene kids love, not to say that scene kids don't like the bands that you can connect with. A good example of a modern band that's often labeled emo that seems very passionate: Brand New. Listen to these guys, the instrumentation is simple for the majority of the songs, but they're is definitely more emotion in every song than most songs being made today. There are many bands like Brand New on the "emo" scene today that are genuinely passionate about the music they make.


Yes, and the Smashing Pumpkins were ALSO influential to what emo music is now. As was David Bowie. But would you call David Bowie emo? No. And, I wasn't referring to social or political issues, you don't want to get me started on that. And I do recall saying something along the lines of "though I'm sure some do" in regards to whether or not they have passion. For example, the members of At The Drive-In, I always felt were passionate about the whole thing, even before I knew who the Mars Volta were. So, I don't have the intention of generalizing all the artists involved. Especially since I'm aware of the fact that with the popularity of punk rock and Seattle, there were plenty of people who faked it by jumping on the bandwagon. And I realize that though the majority of the music out at the time sucked, there were still some that it really did mean a lot to, and weren't doing it for that reason. And I feel it's exactly the same today. But when I was referring to the passion of their music, I was referring to the singing and the music itself. And, I'm not criticizing their ability to play, I'm criticizing the ability to convey emotion in the songs, by singing or playing soulfully. Thus the reason I mentioned Layne Staley, as opposed to someone like Billy Corgan. Why? Layne had a much more soulful voice than Billy did. I'm not doubting whether or not Billy actually felt the way he did with his lyrics, I'm just saying: I find it boring. Same with the guitar playing, I don't feel anyone needs to play as fast as they can, or with the most notes, but I'd really like to see these people actually enjoying what they're playing. You could say, swinging back and forth, and jumping around is them getting into the music, but its not. It's getting into the performance itself, being watched. And looking cool.

Maybe I'm wrong. And if so, who cares? I was just giving a different opinion on music, and I'm not one of those people who hears what is on the radio once or twice, and then forms an invalid opinion on the subject. I'm one of those people who actually listens to it before I decide what I think. And to me, modern emo is like what Nickelback or Creed is to grunge music. Played out, and fake. There are older emo bands that I don't feel this way about, because of the way they sound. If you disagree with what I have to say, fine, but it seems to me that when all the bands that are well-known sound exactly the same, then they obviously have the passion about music that would drive them to do their own thing. The closest thing I ever see to anyone wanting to do something original is when they claim NOT to be emo, because their music is, "You know.. so much deeper than that, and it's more original." Because none of them really want to say.. Yeah, I saw something I thought was cool, and I wanted to be a part of it.

But like I said: I don't feel this way about all emo music, just a large portion of it. Which, of course would fit into what you said about "some of the bands being like that", correct? As I've already said, I'm a fan of earlier emo music. And I gave the newer stuff a chance, and I disliked it. But that's better than what a lot of people can say, ain't it?
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#21
i think hes asking what it is about emo music that appeals to us.

and really, i have no f.ucking clue.
i think the quiet(er) emo stuff is really pretty, and really nice to listen to.

and the more hardcore screamo stuff is just really cool.

but i also love black and death metal cause its br00tal.

and blues and jazz cause its like, sweet

and i like punk and ska cause of the fastness in punk and the just pure fun of ska.

i could go on for all types of music (even hip-hop)
#22
Here's why people say it's derived from punk.

Ian MacKaye, who was in Fugazi and Embrace and produced Rites of Spring, helped shape the DC hardcore punk scene of the 80s as the singer of a band called Minor Threat. Guy Picciotto was in Minor Threat, too. This scene became very violent and stupid, and Ian decided to make softer music to drive away all the skinheads and jackasses from the shows. These new songs were often more emotional and "softer". It became neccessary to differentiate it from regular hardcore, so it was called emotive hardcore, or "emo".

People like emo music because they like the way it sounds, the same reason why anyone listens to any genre.
#23
Oh dear Guy Picciotto was in Rites of Spring dumbass not Minor Threat.
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#24
Quote by YourLastAffront
Oh dear Guy Picciotto was in Rites of Spring dumbass not Minor Threat.

Although you're right, there's no need for the dumbass comment.

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#25
Harsh yo

Well what appeals to me in the music is just the sound..I guess its really just opinion of what you find to be pleasent and catchy and also the deeper meaning that can always be found with more skilled lyricists..Now that i think of it, ive never really listened to and loved any other genre the same way except maybe a little alternative
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#26
Quote by YourLastAffront
Oh dear Guy Picciotto was in Rites of Spring dumbass not Minor Threat.


Oops, my bad.

He definitely had some sort of affiliation with Minor Threat, because I knew his name before I'd even heard of Rites of Spring.
Last edited by hardrock1315 at Apr 30, 2007,
#27
Quote by vegasklinik
I'm not a fan of emo music. I've heard a lot of people label it as punk, saying that it is derived from a mid-80's form of hardcore punk, labeled 'emotive harcore'. And though I have a recollection of a few Northeastern band from the early 80's which could be the inspiration for emo, I'm not so sure I would consider it 'punk' myself, yet genres confuse the hell out of me, considering they are so vague. Well, to my question: Why do you fans like emo music? This is not meant to be derogatory or demeaning in anyway, it is just a common query. Why is it that you connect with the lyrical content of 'emo'? What bands do you fans consider emo?


The line has become extremely vague these days. However, I think the real Emo is pretty much all 90's. Sure, Rites of Spring may have started the movement, but I think of them as more of a punk band.

Personally, I think the following bands Emo:

Sunnyday Real Estate
The Promise Ring
Cap'N Jazz
Jawbreaker
The Get Up Kids.

However, it's something open to interpretation. I don't worry about genres that much though.

There's a lot of different types of music that gets labeled as Emo. For instance, American Football sounds nothing like Fugazi, but they are both usually referred to as Emo.

And I love Emo music because I love pretty much all music. However, being a teenager, Emo is the current genre appealing to me. 4 years ago I was obsessed with Blues and ACDC. But I like to think my tastes have matured (although I still love Blues).

Emo corresponds to the times in our lives. To know that Jesse Lacey is singing the same thing that I'm feeling is one of the greatest and most fulfilling feelings in the world.

Four years ago, my mindset was a lot more simplistic, and because of this, simple music appealed to me. Two years ago I was an angsty 14 year old, and bands like Taking Back Sunday and Brand New seemed to help me through that phase. I don't look for the same emotional relief from their music (save Brand New ) Now, It's just become a matter of them being fun to listen to.

And now I'm just a normal 15 year old kid. My outlook has changed, therefore, so has my music. When I'm feeling pissed off, I don't run to hardcore music as a relief to that, I'd rather listen to American Football, kick back, and think.

Honestly, I don't think the status quo "Emo" fan is in it for the same reasons though. Although, maybe they are where I was 2 years ago, and find something soothing about My Chemical Romance and Aiden. However, I think that most of those people were kind of just the outcasts who saw "Emo" as a place where they can fit in.

To know that right now, Mike Kinsella is probably sitting in his house, drinking beer and watching TV is the coolest thing to me. To know that an entire genre of music is rooted in the talents of a few normal guys is unlike any other genre of music. These guys are the same guys playing in their friends basement with a couple of buddies. The only difference is that they get payed to do so.

They're not rockstars. They don't go into their dressing rooms after shows, waiting to have sex with some slutty fan. They come out, meet their fans, talk with them, get to know them. The fact that I can joke around like we're buddies with a guy I practically worship is so cool to me. That's the kind of scene I want to be a part of.
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#28
Come on!

Other Regs post here!

This is one of the few discussable threads pertaining to Emo that won't turn into a "lolz you cut yer wrists" debate.
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#29
I agree with you.
That's probably one of the main reasons.
If the music sounds good to you why wouldn't it appeal?
Why does the music sound good? Well, that depends on the person.
It's safe to say, however, that we blend multiple sounds together.
Therefore, we have a wider range of appeal.
You're getting yourself confused thinking it's all the stupid things that appeal to us.
A lot of where emo gets criticized is due to misunderstanding of what it is.
We have all these sites and books trying to describe what it is.
None of them seem to appeal to me even vaguely.
And still it's those of us that listen the genre which have the most difficult time defining it.
I've always thought our genre as one that lacked an authentic scene.
But if we do, it makes sense how you described it.
Then again, I would hardly believe Mike to label himself as such.
Personally, I don't give a **** what anyone has to say about Rites of Spring or Fugazi or emotional hardcore because to me you're arguing about completely different things.
At any rate, our genre has gone through a sort of "speciation" event
That's exactly why we have the confusion we have now and the different types of music label as Emo.
And whos to say they're not, right?
Because everything is based on interpretation.
I mean, when it comes down to it we've all said it.
Just listen to the ****ing music that you like.
When we are aware that music is the universal connection between us all;
Genres become less significant. And they should be.
#30
Quote by FatKidsOnMopeds</3

When we are aware that music is the universal connection between us all;
Genres become less significant. And they should be.



I wish everyone had that mindset.
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#31
Quote by vegasklinik
I know who Fugazi is, I'm not a child. I'm just trying to understand the 'scene' and why this music has become so popular. It seems something went right over my head.



I hate to be an elitist here, but Emo music really isn't popular, as it's really not mainstream at all.

The Emo that you see these days (IE My Chem, etc) I think appeals to kids because it's an outlet for frustration. It seems to be a reoccurring theme in music. That, eventually, kids are going to get tired of being spoon-fed Poppy melodies about love. Because, in reality, life is not like that. Bands like My Chem seem to portray the aspects of life in a much more no-nonsense kind of way. A more real kind of way.

And I think that, eventually, kids get tired of hearing whatever MTV churns out. Eventually they get sick of hearing about partying and cars. So they need an outlet, and they find that in maybe a mainstream Emo-Pop crossover band like My Chem. The snowball effect goes into action, and slowly they are exposed to more and more bands, and slowly they get further away from the mainstream. And before you know it, they're life-long listeners, all because they got exposed to some cookie-cutter band from MTV.

The same thing happened in the 90s with Grunge.

And to be honest, I can't describe the Emo "scene," because I have yet to really discover it. Again, on the verge of elitism, I'm going to say that Emo really has no scene because of the fact that Emo really doesn't have any prominance in music these days. Pretty much every local showI go to is either the average Fall Out Boy sounding band, or a hardcore band. You never hear bands playing Sunny Day-esque music these days, so it's hard to define the "scene."

Honestly, I don't think people should overthink their music. Listen to what sounds good. If you want to dig deeper, than go for it, if not, than that's fine. The only reason I really am interpreting Emo this much is because I'm trying to give you some answers.
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#32
I think the emo scene is just the same as the punk scene. Tons of little girls and others here Yellowcard and think they're punk, but they're completely unaware of actual punk bands.
Same thing with emo with bands like My Chemical Romance and Taking Back Sunday.
And I think pop punk,punk,hardcore punk and even crust, is just the same with emo. Theres pop emo bands, slower Mineral esque emo bands, heavier post hardcore ATDI esque bands, screamo and violence.
#33
Quote by Gibson_SG_uzr55
Fugazi are the original emo band, dude.

Emo is very misinterpreted. It is not a person, and it's not a fashion statement (it's a ****ing deathwish, lol, MCR ain't emo, but that made me have to say it), but it is a style of music. People and clothing styles and haircuts are not emo, but should be called scene, which often the terms are misused. Emo is a style of music. That also is misused, cause most people can't think of any real emo bands. Everyone says emo will die in 2007, and it never was big. The only modern pop-punk band that is really emo that got famous is Hawthorne Heights. Emo is like Fugazi, or maybe Jimmy Eat World.

^Yea, Husker Du is early emo.


IMHO, Hawthorne Heights is the crappiest poppiest stereotypical crap to ever hit the music scene.
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#34
The slightly amusing thing is that no band has really wanted to describe themselves as an emo band until the selection of bands appearing post-2000 came about.
But then again, bands don't like to try and label themselves, and I have probably been a bit *can't remember the word at the moment* saying 'no bands' in the above statement.

Came across this a couple of days ago. Not a member of MSN boards, and it's not worth trawling through 29 pages of, but it shows how the term 'emo' really doesn't mean anything these days.

You could ask a selection of 20 different people what bands they consider to be emo and you'll end up with at least four or five different styles in the answer.
Over the years it has lost any meaning. Some will argue that it was all a section of the DC scene, some will say that it was the indie/punk kind of fusion in the 90s, some will say that it has now developed into the screamo side of things, some will say it's acoustic, and some will say it's pop like MCR.

Personally I string the word next to bands like Texas is the Reason, Christie Front Drive, Cap'n Jazz and Mineral. To make things easier in some situations I'll happily say DC are an emo band.

To be completely honest though, if a band wants to be called emo and has been heavily influenced by bands I consider emo bands, I won't bother arguing. Yeah it's a bit defeatist, but then people will argue that the bands I consider emo bands are not emo bands.

The "genre" has splintered off in too many ways to really still be using the word 'emo', but it's nice not to be calling music a million and one different things.
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#35
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Fugazi was never considered emotive hardcore. Ian's other band Embrace was. And Guy's Rites of Spring, which Ian produced.

Anyway, it's not so much that I don't understand Emo music that I dislike it. Or because I don't consider it music, it's that after the nineties, which was full of truly miserable people, who would talk about real problems, the musicians of today seem like they're just doing it because it's what you're supposed to sing about now, and it doesn't come off as soulful as people like Layne Staley were doing it. I also have a hard time taking the music itself seriously, because the artists seemed to not take their instruments seriously, not learning the geography of their fretboards, if you will. Simple music doesn't bother me, but the musicians who play guitar now don't really seem to have a passion for it. Though, I'm sure some do. I've always felt music was about passion, which is why I could always overlook a lot of the things Ian McKaye was doing, or Patti Smith, even though it's simple: You can really feel the emotion and passion they're conveying. And it was at a time, when not everybody was doing what they were, so it doesn't seem like an act.


People like Layne Staley and Kurt Cobain were doing emotional songs, but in cornball ways. The way that many "Emo" bands started doing emotional songs were far more well written than the 90's Alt/grunge stuff. bands got creative and clever with their lyrics.

And you don't need a passion for guitar to play it, because quite frankly, the guitar is just a tool to create music with. And I don't know if you're saying you don't like Patti Smith because the guitar work wasn't impressive (I hope that's not what you're saying), but I find her songwriting incredibly complex and creative.
Poor advice.
#36
What the hell is going on here?
I'm so confused.
What's the question?
Taking Back Sunday = Sensitive Hardcore
#37
i like the music i like because it sounds good through my ears. simple as.

if you want to know some rough facts about emo then just use wiki, it tends to tell you the basics.
Quote by Jaret Reddick
wake me up when september ends makes me cry evry time!

emos forever
:-(
#38
hi everyone, just thought i' come into this thread and say hello.

emo? i like emo, i like lots of emo bands
#39
Quote by J Lock
What the hell is going on here?
I'm so confused.
What's the question?

Same, I still have no idea after two pages.
Quote by bobjewell87
hi everyone, just thought i' come into this thread and say hello.

emo? i like emo, i like lots of emo bands

there is no fear in this heart.



Quote by ETHANEVIL
How am I being or trying to be fabulous/glamorous?



#40
emo.
evryone likes throwing it down because of the whiny voices and all that.
but its just another genre
i personally like any type of rock
anbd emo happens to be some of my favorite songs genres
but dont think that makes me a person who wants to go and cut myself and lament he loss of my girlfriend of two weeks.
its just a misinterpretation.
emo is just music
if youre going to ask that question
ask yourself what punk is and so on...

and i respect that you asked in such a respectful way and didnt just come on here and started blasting emo and the scene...
First Emo of the Bass Militia PM DinkyDaisy to join
Quote by metaldud536
Did your know your son likes to fap?

Quote by Minkaro
I'd rather shove a Pidgeot up my arse than spend any time with Jimmy Page.

Quote by Table Salt
You win for making me really laugh.

add that:
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