BrianApocalypse
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Join date: May 2004
7,782 IQ
#1
Howdy guys.

I've been reading up on "Go your own way" by Fleetwood Mac, and according to the chords on here, it has an Fsus9 / F vamp.

I've looked on the lessons, but haven't been able to find how to play it, so I gots a couple o' questions.

Firstly, how do I play the Fsus9, based on the low E shape barre chord at the first fret?

Is it as simple as taking the barre off? (which doesn't sound quite right)

Secondly, how do I work out a Fsus9? I play up the scale to find the 9th, right?, but do I then raise the 9th or the 3rd?

Help would be greatly appreciated
psychodelia
Defensive Specialist
Join date: Feb 2004
2,298 IQ
#2
That's slightly confusing... hmm.

Well, one option is that you consider it to be an extension of Fsus(7), so you have root, fourth, fifth, minor seventh, and then you add on the ninth.

For which, I might play:

3
1
3
1
3
1


Might put a bit of a strain on your fingers, though; if your thumb can wrap around, you could omit the doubled fifth on the A string and play:

3
1
3
1
X
1


The other option is that the person decided to be confusing and put Fsus9 instead of Fsus2, in which case you might play:

1
1
0
3
3
1
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Spamwise
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Join date: Apr 2006
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#3
Wouldn't a Fsus9 just be a Fsus2 with a 7? (R 3 5 7 9(2) ) Why would the 4th be involved?
Erc
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Join date: Jun 2005
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#4
Wouldn't a Fsus9 just be a Fsus2 with a 7? (R 3 5 7 9(2) ) Why would the 4th be involved?


Because it's a sus chord :p

I'm pretty sure that inless otherwise notated, sus implies the 4th not the 2nd.
Spamwise
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#5
Quote by Erc
Because it's a sus chord :p

I'm pretty sure that inless otherwise notated, sus implies the 4th not the 2nd.

I believe the most common sus chord is the sus4, but there is a sus2 as well. Considering the 9th is the same as the 2nd, I'd think it would be a sus2 with an added 7th.
Tsunoyukami
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2006
543 IQ
#6
Quote by Spamwise
I believe the most common sus chord is the sus4, but there is a sus2 as well. Considering the 9th is the same as the 2nd, I'd think it would be a sus2 with an added 7th.


'sus' without either the 2nd or 4th is short-hand for _7sus4.

I agree that this is confusing. I would either see it as a sus2 chord with the 2 raised an octave, or as a 7sus4 with the second...so would that be a 9sus4?

Okay so if we assume it's just a sus2, we could play it as:


e|3 G (2nd/9th)
B|1 C (5th)
G|0 G (2nd)
D|3 F (root)
A|
E|


But if we went with it as 7sus4 with the 2nd/ninth


e|3 G (2nd/9th)
B|1 C (5th
G|3 Bb (4th)
D|1 Eb (dominant 7th)
A|3 C (5th)
E|1 F (root)


EDIT: psychodelia already did these two, so now it looks like I just copied him...

You could also try playing it at the 8th fret is you wanted to


e|
B|11 (2nd/9th)
G|8 (dominant 7th)
D|8 (4th)
A|8 (root)
E|
Last edited by Tsunoyukami at Jun 6, 2007,
Peanut1614
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Join date: Oct 2005
140 IQ
#8
Quote by Tsunoyukami
'sus' without either the 2nd or 4th is short-hand for _7sus4.

I agree that this is confusing. I would either see it as a sus2 chord with the 2 raised an octave, or as a 7sus4 with the second...so would that be a 9sus4?


Well _sus2 with a ninth is pointless really... so id say more sus4 with a ninth...
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

Spamwise
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#9
Quote by Peanut1614
Well _sus2 with a ninth is pointless really... so id say more sus4 with a ninth...

Well a 9 is a 2. I believe it's called the 9th instead of the 2nd because of the prescence of the 7th.
Peanut1614
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Join date: Oct 2005
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#10
Quote by Spamwise
Well a 9 is a 2. I believe it's called the 9th instead of the 2nd because of the prescence of the 7th.


Its called the 9th instead of 2nd because of the presence of the 3rd i think not 7th. For example you can have Cadd9, yet there is no 7th in it.
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

hurlyz
My name is Karim
Join date: Feb 2007
1,753 IQ
#11
As in _sus9, do you mean _sus (aka _7sus4) with a 9th extension or _sus2 ??
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

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Spamwise
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Join date: Apr 2006
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#12
Quote by Peanut1614
Its called the 9th instead of 2nd because of the presence of the 3rd i think not 7th. For example you can have Cadd9, yet there is no 7th in it.

I dunno, that's what my teacher told me. There's almost always a third, so I don't think it'd just be the third. I could be wrong though.
Peanut1614
UG Board King
Join date: Oct 2005
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#13
Quote by Spamwise
I dunno, that's what my teacher told me. There's almost always a third, so I don't think it'd just be the third. I could be wrong though.


Thats why it's always a 9th! Unless obviously, there is no third and sometimes even if there isn't a third it can still be called a 9th

Think add chords like I said, you wouldn't say Cadd2 or Cadd4 would you?
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

Kennocha
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2006
259 IQ
#14
^.... Cadd2 or Cadd4 would be like C, D, E, G (Cadd2) or C, E, F, G (Cadd4), but Cadd9 or Cadd11 would be .... in Cadd9 -- C, D(up an octave), E, G ... and Cadd11 would be C, E, F(up an octave) G.......

even though a 2 and a 9 / 4 and a 11, are the same notes, it depends on what octave they are in compared to the rest of the chord............

but sus chords mean you replace the 3rd with either a 2nd or 4th... so yea...
Spamwise
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#15
Quote by Peanut1614
Thats why it's always a 9th! Unless obviously, there is no third and sometimes even if there isn't a third it can still be called a 9th

Think add chords like I said, you wouldn't say Cadd2 or Cadd4 would you?

But wait, there isn't a 3rd in a Sus chord right? e.g. Sus2 would be 1 2 5.
6DgOfInTb
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#16
I think it would just be Fsus2. If it were an F9sus, it would be called F9sus4 (or just Fsus).
This chord (Fsus2) would just be 1 2 5, not 1 2 4 5 b7.

Fsus2 would be played:

|-8--|
|-8--|
|-10-|
|-10-|
|-8--|
|-x--|

most conveniently,

Whereas F9sus would be played:
|-8-|
|-8-|
|-8-|
|-8-|
|-8-|
|-x-|

most conveniently.


Both of these chords can be used as the V chord in a song, since they both contain notes from F mixolydian. If it isnt the V chord in question, then I am almost positive this would be the Fsus2 chord rather than the F9sus chord.


Oops, you wanted in the low barre chord position:

|-1-|
|-1-|
|-0-|
|-3-|
|-3-|
|-x-|

I'd probably play it like that. It switches between the Fsus2 and the F (one other reason why it would most likely be the Fsus2 rather than F9sus), and you do that by replacing the open G with an A. The way psychodelia said earlier with the F on the low E-string works too, but that is much harder to play, and there is already another F in the chord.


i know, bad organization.
Hopefully i helped
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