#1
I just want to know, because with guitar, the sound of it is different, but with an acoustic, the sound doesn't sound different, so why would you want to buy a $1000 acoustic if it does the same as the $200???????
#2
Actually, there is a HUGE difference in sound in better made guitars. Most high end acoustics are manufactured with very beautiful wood. If you pick up any $200 guitar and then go and play say a $3000 Taylor, you are going to hear the difference very clearly.
#4
After playing guitar for a while you get an ear for those things.

Tones and other things are CONSIDERABLY different, some sound bright, some sound dark, some are better for recording. It changes with the shape of the body and the quality of the wood.

If your buying an electric acoustic you might also get better electronics, more options for changing your tone quality etc.

On acoustics youll get a nicer neck, more playable, nice smooth fretboard, probably curved not straight. Higher quality tuners, and bridge, and the braces inside the guitar will probably be built stronger etc.
Last edited by AthenasGhost at Jun 18, 2007,
#5
And lower budget guitars make it harder to play on
With high end you've you beautiful sounds and a lovely crafted instrument
#6
Quote by AthenasGhost
After playing guitar for a while you get an ear for those things.

Tones and other things are CONSIDERABLY different, some sound bright, some sound dark, some are better for recording. It changes with the shape of the body and the quality of the wood.

If your buying an electric acoustic you might also get better electronics, more options for changing your tone quality etc.

On acoustics youll get a nicer neck, more playable, nice smooth fretboard, probably curved not straight. Higher quality tuners, and bridge, and the braces inside the guitar will probably be built stronger etc.


+1
#7
there are massive differences, generally, between a $200 guitar and a $1000+ guitar. factors that cause guitars to be priced in the $1000+ range include:

kinds/rarity of tonewoods used
quality of woods used
quality of construction
inlays, bindings, and other cosmetic features
brand name (kinda crappy, but hey it's true)
quality of hardware (tuners, bridge pins, truss rods, etc.)
manufacturer's warranty

the bottom line though, is that all of these things and many other things make a HUGE difference in the tone of acoustic guitars. i feel like you will be able to tell the difference if you play a really nice guitar (say a martin d-28) next to a not-so-nice guitar (say a guitar in the sage series by ibanez).
#9
Quote by eltyr18
k, I understand now, thanks


One thing of advice: If you ever get the chance to play a Taylor or any high end acoustic, I advise you to have a spare set of pants I played a Taylor 514CE, and I've never heard any acoustic sound so beautiful.
#10
A guitar that is five times more expensive doesn't need to be five times better. Coincidentally it is the case with the prices you mention. $200,- is what you pay for a cheap but usable guitar, while at $1000,- you just about enter the realm of top quality instruments. The differences are huge and quite audible even for the untrained listener. But if you compare this $1000,- guitar with one that costs $5000,- the differences might be a lot less noticable. The differences between a $5000,- and a $25.000,- guitar can be completely academic. Chances are that a lot of musicians even judge the less expensive to be better. That is all due to the law of deminishing results. It is easy to improve a bad guitar and difficult to improve a good one and even harder to improve one that is excellent. Improving a $5000,- guitar is virtually impossible, so a $25.000,- guitar is at least $20.000,- pure ballony.
#11
I thought the same thing when starting out playing acoustic, but after two years of playing a $200 Takamine then getting a $1000 Taylor, you'll hear it. Just let your ears grow
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#13
Quote by Marcel Veltman
A guitar that is five times more expensive doesn't need to be five times better. Coincidentally it is the case with the prices you mention. $200,- is what you pay for a cheap but usable guitar, while at $1000,- you just about enter the realm of top quality instruments. The differences are huge and quite audible even for the untrained listener. But if you compare this $1000,- guitar with one that costs $5000,- the differences might be a lot less noticable. The differences between a $5000,- and a $25.000,- guitar can be completely academic. Chances are that a lot of musicians even judge the less expensive to be better. That is all due to the law of deminishing results. It is easy to improve a bad guitar and difficult to improve a good one and even harder to improve one that is excellent. Improving a $5000,- guitar is virtually impossible, so a $25.000,- guitar is at least $20.000,- pure ballony.


The difference between the $5,000 guitar and the $25,000 is the last 1% of your tone.

The last 1% is the difference between great and perfect.

It's also the most obsessive-compulsive habit-formers around, in anything. Just ask Eric Johnson.
#14
Ok- 200 to 1000 the difference is generally going to be things like: Wood Quality, Solid Back/Sides versus plywood, quality control, and design

Hence 1000 will generally sound better than 200

Martin D-15 or Taylor 210 versus some $200 student guitar is no contest
"After while your cheap talk dont even cause me pain...so let your bullets fly like rain."
#15
Bottom line... Sound quality is a HUGE difference and so is playability. Don't fall for a guitar just because of its looks. Goodness, im so happy i bought a taylor gs
Proud Owner of a 2006 Taylor GS Big Leaf Maple/ Sitka Spruce
#16
Quote by Nick_
The difference between the $5,000 guitar and the $25,000 is the last 1% of your tone.

The last 1% is the difference between great and perfect.

It's also the most obsessive-compulsive habit-formers around, in anything. Just ask Eric Johnson.


I didn't know EJ was such a gear freak. He does have a useless number of expensive guitars stashed around in his house, but there are certainly more severe cases of this pathological disorder.

About the 1% difference you mention. I think this doesn't apply. There are great guitars and there are perfect guitars that cost less than $5000,- The differences between two guitars of the same make, the same construction and the same price are a lot more than 1% already. Collectors can find a lot of very good reasons to pay more than 5 grand for a guitar, but none of them will be related to tonal quality or playability.
#17
I used his numbers mostly by way of example, but as far as tone goes $5000 will likely be as much as you need for flattops. When we start talking archtop acoustcs, well now that's a whole different ballpark altogether...


I doubt EJ is diagnosable OCD but he has found his place in guitar player lore for being notoriously picky about the brand of battery in his pedals, the way his leads are coiled, only using the old JazzIIIs (apparently he has a nice little stockpile...) etc.

The 1% applies everywhere though, not just in gear.
#18
Quote by Nick_


The 1% applies everywhere though, not just in gear.


definitaly. It's a basic rule in engineering and applies also in sports, politics and everything else.
But talking about gear. Obviously we agree that somewhere around $5000,- there is a limit beyond which it becomes virtually impossible to improve a flat top. And since I am in the market for a fiddle I learned much to my regret that it is still fairly easy to improve on a $10.000,- hand carved arch top, even a tiny two sided one.
But now let me say something really controversial; a solid body guitar that is so good that even the greatest effort to improve it will be futile doesn't have to cost more than $2000,-.
I know. It's a shock, but I know I'm right.
#19
i am not going to flame you cuz i am a noob and doing the same thing in electric forum, so i have no want, reason or right to, but anyway onto your question, which i will answer with a personal anecdote. today i went to my local guitar store and picked up a $ 400 dollar guitar, it sounded godly, i picked up a $200 guitar and i could not believe the difference! so imaginge betwee 200 and 1000! it will be awesome!

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#20
Quote by an epic mistake
i am not going to flame you cuz i am a noob and doing the same thing in electric forum, so i have no want, reason or right to, but anyway onto your question, which i will answer with a personal anecdote. today i went to my local guitar store and picked up a $ 400 dollar guitar, it sounded godly, i picked up a $200 guitar and i could not believe the difference! so imaginge betwee 200 and 1000! it will be awesome!

That's a bit of a hasty generalization, don't you think? I mean, I've played $200 guitars that have outplayed certain $400 guitars. It's all relative. There's no answer to this question.
#21
Quote by eltyr18
I just want to know, because with guitar, the sound of it is different, but with an acoustic, the sound doesn't sound different, so why would you want to buy a $1000 acoustic if it does the same as the $200???????


Do you really think there wouldn't be a difference between the quality of guitars if there is a $800 price disparity between the two? If that was the case, the vast majority of people couldn't be justified purchasing a guitar over 200 dollars.

Using your common sense, you could presume there is a difference in the sound (even if you can't personally distinguish it), quality of materials used, and cosmetics.
#22
Quote by Marcel Veltman

But now let me say something really controversial; a solid body guitar that is so good that even the greatest effort to improve it will be futile doesn't have to cost more than $2000,-.
I know. It's a shock, but I know I'm right.



new,

I'd bump that to maybe 3.5k for a flattop.

Archtops, maybe 20k

2.5k for an electric.


This is all assuming traditional designs for the most part.

Used it gets really messy because you have to deal with collectability and condition in the price
#23
Quote by Nick_
new,

I'd bump that to maybe 3.5k for a flattop.

Archtops, maybe 20k

2.5k for an electric.


This is all assuming traditional designs for the most part.

Used it gets really messy because you have to deal with collectability and condition in the price


Ok. I can go along with these numbers.
#24
I agree with the $200 comments, but honestly i've played $400 guitars I've liked better then $800 ones and several $800 one that i liked better then guitars twice that price. Price vs quality only takes you so far. It also depends on if you play strictly plugged in or not. Guitars in the $400 to $600 range (electric/acoustic) are really pretty nice if the playability is there for you. and in alot of cases $$$ get added just because they slap some guys name on it. Doesn't mean the quality improved only the marketability to a point.
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#25
Quote by Chad48309
That's a bit of a hasty generalization, don't you think? I mean, I've played $200 guitars that have outplayed certain $400 guitars. It's all relative. There's no answer to this question.


wow your right, my answer doesnt make sense now. everyone disregard my previous statement. it never happened.

Must Not Sleep.


Must Warn Others.

Gear:
Gibson Special Faded SG
Orange Tiny Terror (Combo)
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
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