#1
I just started taking guitar lessons in january or february ish. ive played piano forever, lessons for like 6 or 7 years, i take music theory in school, and i know a pretty good amount of theory and stuff. all the time ive been taking guitar i dont really feel like im learning too much that i feel like i couldnt have learned myself. i told my teacher to start teaching me a little bit more difficult stuff but its mostly boring me, i feel like its not at my level of understanding and i could be learning a lot faster. should i just wait it out and see what i get to learning in the future or bag it and teach myself? do you think id be learning to play as well as if i was taking lessons?
Quote by astepabove
Hey. Guess what. I'm hittin' omgnowai. Yep. That's right. Seriously. Ask her. She'll say "Yes, astepabove is hittin' me".

yeah...he is. hehe
#2
If you have the opportunity for a teacher don't waste it. A lot of people don't even get the chance at a teacher and they help so much. If your teacher isn't challenging you maybe you should get a new one unless he starts to give you said challenges.
#3
If you are not satisfied with your teacher, it's time to find a new one.

To paraphrase Aebersold:

"Study with the best teacher you can find on the best instrument you can afford."
#4
i think that you wouldnt have learned enough but you need to be challanged by lessons or else its not worth it. Unless he/she is using easy songs to teach you stuff like alternating picking or stuff like that.
#5
Teachers help to explain things person-to-person. I know it sounds normal and simple but it is something invaluable to have. To have someone explaining to you what everything means etc. is so much easier than to try and read it on the internet. Happy Bluesrocker?
Last edited by jazz_rock_feel at Jun 18, 2007,
#6
yeah he kinda is a weirdo. i dont take lessons over the summer though so im gonna get a new one in september. its kinda ticking me off though, im so used to learning a ton of stuff in a short amount of time with my piano teacher
Quote by astepabove
Hey. Guess what. I'm hittin' omgnowai. Yep. That's right. Seriously. Ask her. She'll say "Yes, astepabove is hittin' me".

yeah...he is. hehe
#7
Anyways. If you can find a teacher that you're comfortable with it, then go for it. Teachers can be a major help, especially since they can explain something visually, like scales and chords.
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??
#8
You are probably suffering from poor teacher syndrome. With a good teacher you should progress far quicker than without one.

Think of it this way. A good teacher is about 15-20 years of musical experience that you can tap into for just a nominal fee. There is on way in hell that anyone "teaching" themselves from a book and/or by (heaven forbid) bloody tabs and youtube lessons can progress as quickly and practice as efficiently as one who has the direction of a real teacher.

If you don't walk out of each lesson feeling just a little bit more enlightened go find a new one, preferably one who is overqualified. You can usually find such overqualified teachers at your local uni/college.
Last edited by Erc at Jun 18, 2007,
#9
a teacher is probably the best thing u can get. it helps a lot. it may not seem like it at first but dont give up on them
#10
Quote by Erc
You are probably suffering from poor teacher syndrome. With a good teacher you should progress far quicker than without one.


I agree completely. A good teacher will do wonders for your learning. But it all depends on the teacher's skill level, his teaching skill, and personal chemistry. When those three click though you can see astounding results. I had a student last year that progressed more in one year than most people do in 5 and that was all down to me knowing the music/styles he liked and basically just us getting along well.