#1
Hey guys, my band recently won a battle of the bands, and one of the prizes was 16 hours in a local recording studio. We've never been to a studio before and have only recorded at home with some simple stuff. We were just looking for some tips and advice on what to do and how we can prepare ourselves for it. We also have some more specific questions:

1) Do you usually record to a click track/metronome or do you just record without it?

2) About how many songs do you think we can get tracked, mixed, and mastered with the 16 hours of time we have?

3) Does the recording engineer help you come up with ideas for recording, for example double tracking the vocals, or layering the guitars, or is that your job to figure out before you go?

4) Do you play your song for the engineer so he can figure out the best way to record your stuff?

I know some of these questions are probably pretty noobish but thanks in advance for any help or advice you guys have!
#2
I dont know about any of that stuff, but you guys sound pretty good. ALOT like Nirvana
"F*ck off with your sofa units and strine green stripe patterns, I say never be complete, I say stop being perfect, I say let... lets evolve, let the chips fall where they may." -

Tyler Durden
#4
This is based on the little experience I've had:

1)Yes we did record with a metronome because we did the parts separatley, it's only a little studio.
2)It depends how well rehearsed the songs are, if you can knock them off perfectly first time every time you should get through quite a few.
3) The engineer helped us but I'm sure it's one of those things that changes from studio to studio. I'd come up with some ideas before then ask for any further suggestions the engineer might have.
4) The engineer will just record in a way that's used to them that's suitable to your band setup.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#6
Quote by altgrunge

1) Do you usually record to a click track/metronome or do you just record without it?

you most likely will...that or full band while recording drummer only

2) About how many songs do you think we can get tracked, mixed, and mastered with the 16 hours of time we have?

getting the songs tracked & mixed should be the only priority...i'de say 2 songs
pick out 3-4 & practice them every day

3) Does the recording engineer help you come up with ideas for recording, for example double tracking the vocals, or layering the guitars, or is that your job to figure out before you go?
he can suggest things...& if you ask i'm sure he'll answer

4) Do you play your song for the engineer so he can figure out the best way to record your stuff?

never done that,but couldn't hurt
try to waste as little time as possible. everybody should know their part to near perfection
#7
Quote by altgrunge
1) Do you usually record to a click track/metronome or do you just record without it?


You'll most likely record the drummer alone with a click track to keep time, and then all the other instruments will use the drum track to keep time, but a click track might be coupled with that. Practice with a metronome just to get used to it.

Quote by altgrunge

2) About how many songs do you think we can get tracked, mixed, and mastered with the 16 hours of time we have?


If you nail all your songs on the first play then I'd say 3-6 tracks, depending on how much of a perfectionist you are with the mix.

Quote by altgrunge

3) Does the recording engineer help you come up with ideas for recording, for example double tracking the vocals, or layering the guitars, or is that your job to figure out before you go?


He's not just the guy who moves faders and presses the record button. He's also a consultant. Remember, he's working for you, and he's had a lot more experience than you. Talk to him about the sound you want to get and he'll help you out, if he's good.

Quote by altgrunge

4) Do you play your song for the engineer so he can figure out the best way to record your stuff?


Yes, but track by track as you record. You discuss how you want it to sound during the mix.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#8
In 16 hours, my bet is about 2 maybe 3 songs if your lucky, depending how it's spanned out and how rehearsed you are. If you do record to a click track it can make things a lot easier, assuming you are all comfortable playing the songs with the click. If the drums are down perfectly would a click the rest of the instruments should just be a lot easier to play.

The recording engineer is going to have a base idea of what to do with things like that, but thats certain things you should take into account yourself.

Make sure you consider a lot of things though too as well. For drums making sure that you know the exact patterns, limit the fills, and make sure you've rehearsed the ones you're going to do same with bass. Guitars know if you want to double track the guitar, and have your tone planned out already when you go in, so you should be able to get plugged in, miced up and ready to go. Also know which tracks you're going to overdub for guitar...etc. Vocals do what you feel best with. If your vocalist can't double track the vocals don't waste critical time trying to. Remember your time is money.

A lot of those questions can have a million answers. Every engineer is going to be different, some may not be musicians, others will be, which can totally change the way in which things are done. This might be something worth calling up the studio and inquiring about, because I can't tell you how the engineer likes to do things.
#11
congrats,

A lot depends on you. How many songs do you want? If you have ten songs down real tight then jsu record an album live in the studio. Thats the way you are used to it anyway and you want to sound how you sound ,right?

Dont worry about click tracks.Dont worry about click tracks. Forget click tracks .Just play your music. It doesnt have the C.T.

Foeget about them .and metronomes too. If you cant keep time you wouldnt have won the jamfest.
#12
Quote by Now!
congrats,

A lot depends on you. How many songs do you want? If you have ten songs down real tight then jsu record an album live in the studio. Thats the way you are used to it anyway and you want to sound how you sound ,right?

Dont worry about click tracks.Dont worry about click tracks. Forget click tracks .Just play your music. It doesnt have the C.T.

Foeget about them .and metronomes too. If you cant keep time you wouldnt have won the jamfest.


Click tracks make things a lot easier, in a recording scenario, say theres a pause, or everyone holds a note, you are more likely to get that dead on if you can actually hear the beats while recording, or else it could just take several takes. Or for example doing vocals, theres a chance you'll want to use the same vocal for the choruses, if everything is an exact time, the vocal can be easily snapped in place for the second chorus no problem. Its all about getting things done efficiently. But if you do want to record it live off the floor than take that route, and in that case a click wouldn't always make sense.

16 Hours may seem like a lot of time. You've got to remember all sorts of factors which would be things like set-up time for different instruments, the time for the tracks to actually be mixed (Unless you are getting that done seperately).

Look at the following.

Theres the time to set up the drum kit, get it fully miced up, run a soundcheck make sure it's all sounding good. This could end up taking a good half hour of your time. Than from there you begin playing through the songs. Now that may take a little bit to get it totally right, you have to leave yourself room for error. Assume that your aiming for perfection (Why wouldn't you), so it takes the drummer maybe 4 or 5 takes to get the entire thing right for the first song. The songs something like 5 minutes long. He plays through the song once, you guys listen to it back take a note of what was wrong. So that ends up taking 10 minutes in total. So by the time you're finished you end up having taken up about an hour of your time. Now as the drummer starts to get into the groove of things the other one or two songs should come along a bit easier. So maybe total time you spend on drums is about 2-3 hours for the 3 songs.

Bass similar idea.

Guitar same thing again, and than it comes down to having to deal with all the overdubs and such that you may have.

Generally since Vocals are most important you'd want to spend a lot more time on this part.

I'm just going to say don't rush this sort of thing. If you read on recording forums and stuff thats a big complaint amongst engineers is bands (particularly younger) expecting to accomplish too much in a small time frame.

You need to ultimately decide what your aiming for. And if it ends up that you get 2-3 songs done in a lot less time than you thought, than thats even better. Obviously I can't account for every band and I'm sure there are bands that could accomplish a lot more.

Thats just my two cents.
#13
Quote by Now!
congrats,

A lot depends on you. How many songs do you want? If you have ten songs down real tight then jsu record an album live in the studio. Thats the way you are used to it anyway and you want to sound how you sound ,right?

Dont worry about click tracks.Dont worry about click tracks. Forget click tracks .Just play your music. It doesnt have the C.T.

Foeget about them .and metronomes too. If you cant keep time you wouldnt have won the jamfest.

Take_it_t just commented so I won't have to as well but I just wanted to be in on saying "FALSE!"
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#14
My band went into a studio about two months ago to record a demo. One thing we learned was to let every single guitar take hang at the end. This is so proper fading can be added and you have more time to work with in the final mix down process.

Also, bring lots of water, strings, picks, extra guitars, and cables as well. Try not to get stoned before the recording process because it does not help at all.
#15
I didnt read all of the posts here,so excuse me if this has been said already,..to shave more time your way,make sure your drummers heads are properly tuned before you get there,as well as all other instruments.This could eat up lots of time.(that is,if your using your kit and not the studios)

Alot of it depends on your band,the more rehersed you are,the faster the process goes.
Heres where you will see who is the weakest link/links in your band.
And listen to your engineer(if hes any good) you will want his input and suggestions.
Dont be the arrogant band that hes recorded 20x's over.....everyone (in the band)wants their more this.or less that....your not the first and definitly wont be the last.
Just show up and play as tight as possible..thats your only F'n job!
Last edited by PsychomanZ at Jun 21, 2007,