#1
I've been playing guitar for about 3 months now.. almost 4. I'm curious about a couple of things here. I'm still learning to do my first song, Hell's Bell's. It's been 3 months since I started learning it and... well should it take that long? For me? A beginner? I chose to take my time with it so I'd play it good, so occasionally each day I'd go, "Okay, I'll learn this part of the song now and practice till I'm good at it." and then when I play it good I move on to the other part, and then repeat.. since I started learning it I've drifted away from finishing it though cause I'm just learning riffs from other songs and stuff. I'm into the solo now and I'm having to break it down into parts to practice as always and when I'm done i'll piece it together, I've got the pre-solo down so far. So i'm wondering, is there a better way to do this? A faster way? Should I just learn all the parts of the song instead and practice it all together starting from complete crap to being good at it? Which way do you think is better at learning a song to just overall get better a guitar.

Did any of you guys start out the way i'm starting out? Thats my second question.

EDIT: By the way, don't say learn an easier song, I don't want my first song to me smoke on the water, I could probably learn that easily in a few days or less, it's not challenging!
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
Last edited by ScruffMcGruff at Jun 23, 2007,
#2
get a teacher for the first year or so, it helps sooooo much and you learn 100s of times faster.
#3
That's already being taking care of, I'm taking a guitar class for my next year of school. Thanks
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
#4
It doesn't surprise me - you're honestly better off spending a couple of months simpky learning the basics of guitar playing before jumping into songs...namely open chords, barre chords, modifying chords into minor, 7th and other common inversions, right hand strumming technique, fretting cleanly, picking single strings cleanly.

If you try to learn a song whilst at the same time trying to learn the basic techniques needed to play you will struggle and you won't be making the best use of your time.

EDIT: By the way, don't say learn an easier song, I don't want my first song to me smoke on the water, I could probably learn that easily in a few days or less, it's not challenging!


Don't kid yourself, when you start playing you know NOTHING, therefore you should start at the beginning. That doesn't even mean smoke on the water, that means boring crap like Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, Puff the Magic Dragon and Mull of Kintyre. There is nothing that isn't worth learning on the guitar, but trying to do something to far above your skill level (which is 0 if you're a complete beginner) is grossly counter-productive.

Think about it, in your 3 months you may have learned some of Hells Bells, but you've learned ABSOLUTELY ZILCH about "playing the guitar". You need to reasess how you go about this, because at this rate you'll just learn a song every few months for the rest of your life. There's no skill in being able to play songs parrot-fashion, you need to have some understanding as to what's going on too. Otherwise all you do is learn stuff in the context of the songs and you have no way of using that knowledge in any other aspect of your playing.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 23, 2007,
#5
Quote by steven seagull
It doesn't surprise me - you're honestly better off spending a couple of months simpky learning the basics of guitar playing before jumping into songs...namely open chords, barre chords, modifying chords into minor, 7th and other common inversions, right hand strumming technique, fretting cleanly, picking single strings cleanly.

If you try to learn a song whilst at the same time trying to learn the basic techniques needed to play you will struggle and you won't be making the best use of your time.


Don't kid yourself, when you start playing you know NOTHING, therefore you should start at the beginning. That doesn't even mean smoke on the water, that means boring crap like Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, Puff the Magic Dragon and Mull of Kintyre. There is nothing that isn't worth learning on the guitar, but trying to do something to far above your skill level (which is 0 if you're a complete beginner) is grossly counter-productive.

Think about it, in your 3 months you may have learned some of Hells Bells, but you've learned ABSOLUTELY ZILCH about "playing the guitar". You need to reasess how you go about this, because at this rate you'll just learn a song every few months for the rest of your life. There's no skill in being able to play songs parrot-fashion, you need to have some understanding as to what's going on too. Otherwise all you do is learn stuff in the context of the songs and you have no way of using that knowledge in any other aspect of your playing.


Very well said, Steven Seagull

I couldn't imagine trying to just jump into a song not knowing anything (which I don't) I would be so lost and I know it would take me ages for me to learn anything that way.

I will proudly boast my first song is Mary Had a Little Lamb.
#6
Quote by steven seagull
Think about it, in your 3 months you may have learned some of Hells Bells, but you've learned ABSOLUTELY ZILCH about "playing the guitar". You need to reasess how you go about this, because at this rate you'll just learn a song every few months for the rest of your life. There's no skill in being able to play songs parrot-fashion, you need to have some understanding as to what's going on too. Otherwise all you do is learn stuff in the context of the songs and you have no way of using that knowledge in any other aspect of your playing.


Well, within that 3 month time frame I actually have learned a bit about the guitar, more than I have revealed, which I should have previously. I know all major, minor, seventh, minor seventh, and major seventh chords. I'm learning my sixths. I've learned how chords are basically constructed and they're more closely related to scales than I previously thought. I've memorized all the notes on the fretboard... on a normal guitar anyway. Know how to tune, etc. You get the point, but I see what you're saying regardless of how much I know anyway.. which actually I think isn't a lot when compared to what professional guitarists know. I really got to experience what you just told me first hand when getting into learning a portion of the solo today. Weeks earlier I couldn't even play it, cause I had never alternate picked and that was required to play it fast enough, but today I had practiced alternate picking enough and could play, pretty much the entire song much better! It's things like that which got me wondering about this stuff. Thanks for clarifying!
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
#7
In that case you're doing better than a lot of people!

I still wouldn't worry about whole songs yet, concentrate on your rhythm playing for the time being and get that soild, you've got the rest of your life to learn how to solo. Soloing is also a LOT easier when you've inverstigated the minor pentatonic...you can usually see how solos fit in that scale and you learn to spot familiar licks and patterns very quickly (particularly with AC/DC). Also, Hell's Bells isn't exactly a simple solo - try Highway to Hell or Touch Too Much first, they're two of Angus's more straightforward solos.
Actually called Mark!

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#8
I wouldn't go for a whole song, it is much easier just to play a lot of different songs so you become a little more well-rounded, and the more you know the less time it will take to learn a song.
#9
Well how much do you play a day? You could learn one song for 3 months playing 15 minutes a day or 3 hours a day you know. In my opinion it may be taking a little too long and I could never learn the same song for 3 months, even though you said not to, but I really think you should start playing easier songs.
#10
I've only been playing a month, and I know a few simple songs, and many basic riffs. Three months seems like a long time to learn one song, though you've done well in learning chords, chord changes, and some theory in that time as well.

I agree with Mr. Seagull, though... creating a foundation to build upon is paramount, and trying to learn something that's not exactly for beginners could (and seemingly has) slow down your learning. There's nothing as frustrating for you or others listening to you as knowing dozens of song fragments not a single complete one, I know, but slow and steady wins the race. Try something easier and work your way up, IMO.
#12
the solo is not a beginner solo imo...


maybe you can tell us where your are in each part, because i think it shouldn't take a month to learn the intro...

P.S. guitar is about you...and you could compare a great writer/theorist(??idk...) with one guy who knows 100 songs, but at the end of the day, who can do what the guitar has been used for for years...

EXPRESS THEMSELVES!!!


Sorry, i feel this aspect is way overlooked in learning to play...
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#13
Quote by steven seagull
It doesn't surprise me - you're honestly better off spending a couple of months simpky learning the basics of guitar playing before jumping into songs...namely open chords, barre chords, modifying chords into minor, 7th and other common inversions, right hand strumming technique, fretting cleanly, picking single strings cleanly.

If you try to learn a song whilst at the same time trying to learn the basic techniques needed to play you will struggle and you won't be making the best use of your time.


Don't kid yourself, when you start playing you know NOTHING, therefore you should start at the beginning. That doesn't even mean smoke on the water, that means boring crap like Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, Puff the Magic Dragon and Mull of Kintyre. There is nothing that isn't worth learning on the guitar, but trying to do something to far above your skill level (which is 0 if you're a complete beginner) is grossly counter-productive.

Think about it, in your 3 months you may have learned some of Hells Bells, but you've learned ABSOLUTELY ZILCH about "playing the guitar". You need to reasess how you go about this, because at this rate you'll just learn a song every few months for the rest of your life. There's no skill in being able to play songs parrot-fashion, you need to have some understanding as to what's going on too. Otherwise all you do is learn stuff in the context of the songs and you have no way of using that knowledge in any other aspect of your playing.


not really, it's better to learn an easy song that you like. its more self rewarding and it's more fun for yourself.
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#14
Quote by ScruffMcGruff
That's already being taking care of, I'm taking a guitar class for my next year of school. Thanks

that doesnt do **** usually
my sister's kid did that and all they did was teach him songs...not how to play
I'll lay waiting, just waiting for my time to come