#1
Hi,

Odd question this. "What evil bastard wants to do BARRE insted of POWER CHORDS?!"

I know, I know, lol. But I'm pretty much just starting and my guitar tutor tabbed this for me this evening, but he got it way off.

Say Anything - By Tonight, the power chord tabbed version is here:

http://ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/s/say_anything/by_tonight_tab.htm

My tutor tabbed it out (very quickly, and he'd never heard say anything before -- They aren't very big in the UK.) and came up with...

A (3 strums)
Bm (2 srums)
F# (2 strums)
G (4 strums)
repeat (thats the intro) which seems kinda... way off to me.

So is there a way to convert power chords to barre (and vice-versa) if so, how do I do it, and for this one time only can you show me using this song as an example so I can do it myself in the future?

Thanks in advance everyone!

-sc00t
#2
There isn't a specific way (I think) because you have Bm, but if you have B5 (B powerchord), it can either be B or Bm, that you have to find out on your own, but otherwise, just put the barre for the rest of the strings, and look on your own for adding fingers...
#3
'Kay so I guess I just play the barre chord that corresponds with the power chord?

For example if the powerchord is an A, I'd play an A Barre Chord?

In that instance, how do I work out from viewing the above linked tab what chord is what?

for example...

-
-
-
7
7
5

What chord is that?

Excuse my total n00bness :-)

-sc00t
#4
Quote by sc00t
'Kay so I guess I just play the barre chord that corresponds with the power chord?

For example if the powerchord is an A, I'd play an A Barre Chord?

In that instance, how do I work out from viewing the above linked tab what chord is what?

for example...

-
-
-
7
7
5

What chord is that?

Excuse my total n00bness :-)

-sc00t


you should research the formation of chord progressions. this one however, does not seem familiar to me, and I have never heard the song you are talking about.
#5
Quote by sc00t

For example if the powerchord is an A, I'd play an A Barre Chord?


-sc00t


NO! This is a bad generalization, HOWEVER, if you were playing an A Major barre chord you could play an A5 powerchord. There are instances however when the chord must be minor! Powerchords do not contain the note that defines either a major or minor chord, that's why it is interchangeable. However, playing an A major chord over what should be an A minor chord is a no-no. Basically, you can only change an A major OR A minor chord to a A5 Powerchord, if you do it the other way around randomly you have a 50-50 chance of being right.
#6
Okie-Dokie. So what's the sure-fire way of being right when converting?

Cheers,
-Sc00t
#7
Quote by sc00t
Okie-Dokie. So what's the sure-fire way of being right when converting?

Cheers,
-Sc00t



First you want to make sure what key the song's in. This can be a problem if you are just learning the song, but if you were reading sheet music, the publisher would let you know by putting a key signature at the beginning of the piece. However, since we as guitarists are not always prone to reading sheet music, we sometimes have to do a bit of guessing. However, there is a general rule of thumb, many times in a piece, the first note defines the key. Say the first note was a B, we could go into it thinking the key was B major and B minor, to figure that out we would keep listening and playing with the intervals to see which one matches the piece.

However, if you are told the key of the piece, for example a piece in A Major,
you could figure out which chords belong in A Major. This is the basic concept behind chord progressions

where capitalized roman numerals are Major and lower cased ones are minor

I - A major
ii - B minor
iii - C# minor
IV - D major
V - E Major
vi - F# Minor
vii* - G# dim

or for a progression in C Major

I - C Major
ii - D minor
iii - E minor
IV - F major
V - G Major
vi - A minor
vii* - B dim

this is generally how you would figure out which chords to use in a certain key. however, sometimes in songs that do not have structure will not include this, not all music is formulaic, and it's not meant to be. sorry i cant give you better advice. Your ear is your most important instrument, whatever sounds good is probaby 'right.'