#1
hey i need to write something for my band, i want a nice crushing riff, but can never seem to write something that really sticks in the mind, i was wandering if anyone has any tips on writing something a bit more special?? thanks guys
#2
stay at it. Usually the really good stuff takes ages to think of
#3
.... best suggestion is to learn some metal riffs, some theory and use your knowledge to right something rockin.
#6
I know its prolly not the best thing to do
but if Im "stuck in a rut"
Ill just tune to Drop D and hammer something out

I realize it can only get you so far, but its usually a good way (for me personally) to come up with something
#7
Try slowing the tempo down, I mean REAL slow, then throw in some syncopation (playing on the upbeat). You start to get a real heavy, groovy feel. I oughta try that some time.
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#8
Tune to drop D, Find a couple power chords and add in random chromatics and pinch harmonics. You're set.
#9
Quote by FlyF1402
Tune to drop D, Find a couple power chords and add in random chromatics and pinch harmonics. You're set.


olololololol.


You'll want to decide on a key first of course.

Once that's set, find a scale or mode to use. Aeolian and Phrygian are favourites. Then, just play the notes of that scale. Try different rhythms, note orders ect, play some as power chords, some as singular notes, whatever you want to do.

Approach it in a structured manner and you'll find something.
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#10
Quote by FlyF1402
Tune to drop D, Find a couple power chords and add in random chromatics and pinch harmonics. You're set.


hahah. that will definitely be memorable! Statements like this are why some people assume drop tuned metal isn't as good.
#11
Yeh, I tend to drop it into D for my band.


All though riffs in drop D dont create as an effective hook than standard tuning riffs.

Keep it simple, and do what some of the others said and use syncopation, it keeps the listener intrested.

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#12
^ i disagree, i've got 5 new songs ALL of which are as catchy if not more so than my standard tuned songs. it's all about how you write the song, not what tuning its in. the space between notes matters as much as the notes (if not moreso)
#13
Listen to "Masters Apprentice" by Opeth. Thats an amazing opening riff. I dunno, it might give you inspiration.
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#14
Quote by Metallica798
Yeh, I tend to drop it into D for my band.


All though riffs in drop D dont create as an effective hook than standard tuning riffs.

Keep it simple, and do what some of the others said and use syncopation, it keeps the listener intrested.

(Y)
xo


The only difference in D and E is the key it's in. It's not like E is a catchier key than D.
#15
Quote by add666
stay at it. Usually the really good stuff takes ages to think of



True and not true.

I just play scales for a few minutes, then I start randomly playing notes (in a scale of course, but randomly)

After a few minutes of this, I just stop 'thinking' and start feeling.

I close my eyes sometimes and shut out the outside world and just feel that I need to pause here, and hold this note here, and quickly double pick this note while vibrating a note higher right after.. etc.. etc.

Once I have a general melody, THEN it takes ages to perfect it. To add other instrument parts (2nd guitar / vocals) and to get the timing and picking down perfectly to play it at a comfortable speed.

Really, my main tip - is to stop thinking with your head and start feeling with your heart.

Once you get an idea, you can think with your head and make it musically 'correct'.

Edit: I've also found that it helps to play stuff with fewer notes - like 3-4 notes max. Just to get a tempo and 'feel' down.. then add fill notes and changes.
#16
For a crushing riff you wanna rely heavily on your beat. Worry more about your beat as opposed to your melody. Although don't abandon it. Thinking in terms of sets of four is generally good starting point. I always use the trusty head bangin method to feel the beat. I then try subdividing (slicing) the beat in different ways. A quarter note, 2 eights, 4 sixteenths, you get the idea. Then I try dotted notes. Really experiment with the beat. This always seems to inspire a good foundation to which I later can think out little touches here and there. A crushing riff is something you can move your body to!
Last edited by sixstringedaxe at Jun 30, 2007,
#17
Quote by ChasingInfinity
The only difference in D and E is the key it's in. It's not like E is a catchier key than D.



E is much catchier than D acctually, I mean you can do much more with all of the strings when you are in standard, when you are in drop D you are limited to power chords mostly, unless you know how to play in that tuning, which I do as well, but I much prefer standard, if your a wuss and cant keep your hand in the position for the REAL power chord in standard, and have to tune to drop D to be able to maintain it, then I guess I understand.

BTW, to keep this on subject, I always like to just screw around to right new stuff, if you are not the only guitarist in your band, then try getting together with your other guitarist and rocking out, or if you are the only guitarist, then I guess get together with your bassist, I dunno, just do what feels natural, if your a real musician, then you should feel at home behind your axe, and should be able to right something awsome.
#18
For me its harder to come up with a good progression than making up a good riff because the whole verse or chorus or bridge will be based on those notes... It also sets direction of where u going, so it doesnt sound like ur randomly moving up n down the neck!!
When i finally get something I record it and loop it.
For the riff I start playing with open string (D tuning) and some other note just to get a rhythm.
Then i add another note, keep playing it, add other note, keep playing. Make variations of the same 4-5 notes.
After a week or so i get something that i like, doesn't mean it automatically becomes part of my next song but at least its something!

Help with progressions as well??? thanks
Last edited by Pabli7o at Jul 1, 2007,
#19
I'm gonna speak from the point of view of a guy who tunes to drop C, since I'm a guy who tunes to drop C.

Chug the C and G together, not just the C. Get a heavy pick attack, heavy enough that your strings hit the fretboard. Remember that your feel makes a huge difference. Once you have your rhythm, alternate between the low C and whatever you want to use for your hook. Minor or phrygian are good scales to use. If you want the song to have a hXc kind of sound, harmonize whatever you play at a third.
#20
Quote by Pabli7o
Help with progressions as well??? thanks

To write a chord progression, the best way I know of is to write the bass notes first. Then, add in the soprano voice, so you have a nice melody on top. Then you just fill in the alto and tenor. That's how to write good old fashiond Baroque styled chord progressions.
#21
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#22
Quote by troyponce
To write a chord progression, the best way I know of is to write the bass notes first. Then, add in the soprano voice, so you have a nice melody on top. Then you just fill in the alto and tenor. That's how to write good old fashiond Baroque styled chord progressions.

4 part harmony in metal?I dont know how u do it but thats more for like Bach chorals. I've done that in college.

It'd be interesting if u can show us how to do it in metal. So i can apply some of my classical theory into metal
#23
well once u get a riff and u play it for a while its gonna sound plain. so spice it up with some runs, pieces of scales, pinch harmonics, natural harmonics. this process take s a while but i just went through that so it's not that bad.
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#24
Quote by silvertoness11
well once u get a riff and u play it for a while its gonna sound plain. so spice it up with some runs, pieces of scales, pinch harmonics, natural harmonics. this process take s a while but i just went through that so it's not that bad.

That's damn good advice.
#25
Just listen to some really nice riffs, and kinda take bits and peices out of it. Or play a whole riff Backwards.
#26
Listen to Lamb of God.
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#27
I agree I will usually just break out the pentatonics and play some random scales and usually have something pretty good in a matter of minutes.