#1
Learning "Box" shapes of scales was easy, but I was self taught and didn't realize the importance of learning the notes and how much easier it makes it to get from what note you are on to what note you want to be on next.

I always had trouble getting out the "box" shapes and moving more freely up and down the fretboard. So instead of just learning the notes out right, I found it was easier for me to learn the target notes of a certain box, then I would know what notes I was playing by knowing I was playing a Am scale, or a G major scale or whatever. Do this enough, and in every key and voila, you know the fretboard.

I made this little web page to help me learn the notes, and I thought it might help some others so I thought I would post it here.

Click here:
Pentatonic Scale Shapes with Target Notes

Peace,
Scrilla

P.S. This was a fast rough draft from what I have written on paper, so if any of you gurus see any mistakes please let me know.
#2
That's a really cool method actually. Well done, although doing this in conjunction with other methods obviously yields faster results.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#3
Quote by MadassAlex
That's a really cool method actually. Well done, although doing this in conjunction with other methods obviously yields faster results.


I agree. Learning in a myriad of different ways will always help you progess faster.

Another cool trick is to play the whole scale just on 2 strings, 4 notes from each pattern.

For example play the first 4 notes C form, then first 4 notes of the A form, first 4 of the G form.. and work your way all the way up the neck, then rinse and repeat with notes 3 through 6 (2nd and 3rd string)... 5 through 8 (3rd and 4th string), and so on. Then do it backwards
#4
What was great for me was playing melodies on one string at a time, saying the names of the notes in my head, so that way you end up having a kind of random mix of the notes you want from the scale.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#5
At the moment, in my infantile exploration into music and scales ( ), I think you and I are on the same page. I just play little improvised ....riffs? on 1 string at a time, then I try to mix it up a bit with the other strings, can't seem to memorize the fretboard however.
#6
The whole fretboard was difficult to nail but just do a bit at a time. Locate where you keep forgetting notes and focus there until they come easily to you.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#7
Yeah, I kinda cheat; I only (for now) am memorizing up to the 12th fret, as they repeat afterwards, I simply play the first half. /shrug
Last edited by will0mon at Jun 29, 2007,
#8
That's fine... no reason to repeat up there. The dots really help up there more than on the lower half for finding notes initially, but in time it all sinks in.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.