#1
So i was jamming with my friend whos been playing for awhile and knows what hes doing. We were trying to play freebird while i did the chords. He says i need to get better at staying on beat. I guess im not very good at playing with other people. I dont learn very much rhythm on my own. I dont really get the whole beat concept i guess. Do any of you have suggestions on how i could improve in this department.
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"
#3
Metronome deffinatly, I had the worst timing of anyone I knew. I started practicing with a metronome, and I got so much better, I don't even practice with it regularly and it still helps so much. You don't even really need to play to it, you can just tap your foot with it and it'll still be beneficial, though you should probably play your guitar to it every once in a while at least. I can't stress enough the importance of using a metronome, if you use it properly it's like magic.
#4
yeah play some scale using different note values ie quavers, semi quavers(8ths and 16ths) also it helps to play the songs you learn with a metronome, it is so vital, but yeah as said above it improves your rhythm so much, just don'y become too dependant on it. also have sometimes feel rhythm. another thing you could do is get the rockschool books they have compitions that use off beats and force you to play with a metronome
#6
use a metronome, or a drum machine. the drum machine is nice because its more interesting, but the drums accent certain beats, so you might want to either work against the drum machine's accents, or just go with a metronome.
#7
Im not very good at telling the beat of the song. So if i were to wanna use a metronome how do i know where to set it at and what not? Can there only be 4 beats in a measure? And like when you tap your foot, do you just tap to the beat on the song as 1,2,3,4 with the speed according to the beat or what?
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"
Last edited by wHere_aM_i at Jun 29, 2007,
#8
Okay. Here's the basics.

A song usually goes at a set bpm (beats per minute)

For example, if a song is at 60 bpm, that's one beat per second.

Songs are also broken into time signiatures, such as a 4/4 beat

The first four signifies what kind of note takes up a whole beat, i.e a quarter note, that is a note that last a whole beat (a whole note lasts 4 beats, or a whole measure of 4/4 time).
The second four signifies how many beats per a measure of music.

So in the case of 4/4 time, there would be four beats per a bar, and each bar can fit four quarter notes, or eight eighth notes, or sixteen sixteenth notes ect. or any combination of that.
Another example is 7/8 time, which is equatable to 3.5/4. You can fix 7 eighth notes into a 7/8 bar, or fourteen sixteenth notes ect.
In a 2/4 bar of music you can fit 2 quarter notes, or four eighth notes ect.

Bar = measure by the way.

So if a song is at 60 bpm in a series of 4/4 measures, that means each measure takes four seconds to complete. You want to generally count 1&2&3&4 in your mind and count 1, 2, 3, 4 with your foot or nodding your head.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
Last edited by MadassAlex at Jun 29, 2007,
#9
Cool that gets me going somewhere. So for beats is the maximum amount of beats in one measure?
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"
#10
Not quite. It depends on the time signiature.

The first number is how many beats in the bar (this could be anything) the second number is which kind of note takes up a beat.

So in 16/4 time, you'd play 16 beats per measure. But usually that's not the case, usually songs are in 4/4 time.

Other common time signiatures are 3/4 (three beats to a measure), 7/8 (as above, equatable to three-and-a-half beats to a measure) and 2/4 (two beats to a measure). But none of those are as common as 4/4 time, so if you just practise the 4/4 rhythm others will become easier, too.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#11
tap your foot, when it goes down its 1, when you raise its a and, when you go down its a 2, etc
I'll lay waiting, just waiting for my time to come
#12
Quote by MadassAlex
Not quite. It depends on the time signiature.

The first number is how many beats in the bar (this could be anything) the second number is which kind of note takes up a beat.

So in 16/4 time, you'd play 16 beats per measure. But usually that's not the case, usually songs are in 4/4 time.

Other common time signiatures are 3/4 (three beats to a measure), 7/8 (as above, equatable to three-and-a-half beats to a measure) and 2/4 (two beats to a measure). But none of those are as common as 4/4 time, so if you just practise the 4/4 rhythm others will become easier, too.

You mean in 16/4 times your playing 16 notes in a measure of 4 beats? right?
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"
#13
Quote by wHere_aM_i
You mean in 16/4 times your playing 16 notes in a measure of 4 beats? right?


Wrong way around. 16/4 means you're playing any number of notes (depending on the speed of each note ) within 16 beats.

First number = number of beats in the bar
Second number = what type of note gets a beat
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#14
It also is pretty important to count the beats in your head. Like:
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & 2 & ...

A pro always knows what beat they're on.

I have to admit I need to work on that. I can subdivide beats OK, but when it comes
to do that AND tracking which beat you're on -- that's pretty hard when the note
lengths are changing a lot.

But at any rate, anyone who hasn't practiced to either a metronome or drum beat,
is probably going to find it hard to play with others. You may think you're playing
in time by yourself, but you're not really.
#15
Quote by MadassAlex


Songs are also broken into time signiatures, such as a 4/4 beat

The first four signifies what kind of note takes up a whole beat, i.e a quarter note, that is a note that last a whole beat (a whole note lasts 4 beats, or a whole measure of 4/4 time).
The second four signifies how many beats per a measure of music.




Quote by MadassAlex


The first number is how many beats in the bar (this could be anything) the second number is which kind of note takes up a beat.



That kind of confused me a little bit. I thought the second number meant the amount of beats per measure.


Quote by MadassAlex
Wrong way around. 16/4 means you're playing any number of notes (depending on the speed of each note ) within 16 beats.

First number = number of beats in the bar
Second number = what type of note gets a beat


So in this example 16/4 time, the 16 means theres 16 beats in a measure. I got that. So what type of notes would take up a beat if the second number is 4?
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"
#16
Quote by wHere_aM_i

So in this example 16/4 time, the 16 means theres 16 beats in a measure. I got that. So what type of notes would take up a beat if the second number is 4?


If the second number is 4, then quarter notes (crotchets, if I remember correctly, is the other musical term for them) would take up a single beat. If it's an 8, eighth notes would take up a single beat.

If you think of the second number as "1[that is, just one, NOT the first number] divided by [second number]" then you get the type of note that takes up a single beat.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#17
cool, i think i got it. thanks.
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"