#1
I'm learning all the notes on the neck by heart, what ways do you all think are the best for doing this? I mean there is the obvious say aloud while playing them up and down the strings, but does anyone have different more - refined approaches? Help is appreciated.
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#2
I did this for bass. Learn all on your bottom E and then learn to find Octaves. Not only is it quicker you can throw them into you basslines.
#3
perosnally i find that is the best way. some people put a picture of the neck with all the notes on it right on there desk top but personaly i need the guitar i my hand. if you use a cromatic tuner it will show you the notes you are playing up and down the neck. but i think doing it the way you are doing it is the best way
#4
Quote by Greg Harper
I did this for bass. Learn all on your bottom E and then learn to find Octaves. Not only is it quicker you can throw them into you basslines.



i have been learning my major scales and minors and chord construction and what not but i was wondering what is an octive if you could please halp me out lol
#5
The same note but at a different pitch. For example, the open E string and the 12th fret E string. Both notes are called E but they are different pitches. Specifically, the higher E is twice the frequency of the open E.

Edit: A cool way to kill two birds with one stone (sort of) is to go through the circle of fifths, finding every note in every position all over the neck. So you'd start with C, and find all the C's on the neck. Then you'd do G, D, A etc all around the circle. This helps learning the Co5 and the notes at once.

Another way would be to pick a scale pattern and play through it, singing the note names as you go. You could also do the Co5 thing only within the certain pattern.

There are free fretboard trainer programs that you can use to test yourself (they give completely random notes, so you can't cheat), but actually learning the notes should be done with a physical guitar.

The most common way is to just play each string up and down and name the notes.

It is very beneficial to sing the notes instead of just naming them (for all of these methods) as it helps with ear training.
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Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Jun 29, 2007,
#6
Quote by lbc_sublime
i have been learning my major scales and minors and chord construction and what not but i was wondering what is an octive if you could please halp me out lol


An octave is a collection of 12 different notes that are adjacent to the next/previous one. So, for example, open E to D# on an E string would be one octave, and the next E (at the 12th fret) would be the beginning of the next octave. Alternatively, you could find the beginning of the next octave on a different string, such as the second fret of the D string or seventh fret of the A string. All of those are the same E note, all of them have an octave in between them and the low open E note.

EDIT: Or, as above, an octave can be the same note 12 semitones up. Both the difference between two of the "same" note and the two notes are termed as "octaves".
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#8
Quote by MadassAlex
An octave is a collection of 12 different notes that are adjacent to the next/previous one. So, for example, open E to D# on an E string would be one octave, and the next E (at the 12th fret) would be the beginning of the next octave. Alternatively, you could find the beginning of the next octave on a different string, such as the second fret of the D string or seventh fret of the A string. All of those are the same E note, all of them have an octave in between them and the low open E note.

EDIT: Or, as above, an octave can be the same note 12 semitones up. Both the difference between two of the "same" note and the two notes are termed as "octaves".


Erm E to D# is not an octave? oct = 12? Im pretty sure you know what one is from your other descriptions but the first ones wrong.

Read Primes answer for the best description of one.
Quote by cakemonster91

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Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#9
It isn't that hard. Alot of people start out by learning the top five frets of off the stings, and that is it really that you have to know to know the whole board. Just get used to those notes and know where octives are (for example, you can find the octive of any note on the E and A strings by skipping to the D or G and then raising to frets). After a while, your brain just reconizes the note. At least that is what happened to me.
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#10
i learned where every note in c major was then i could just pick out all of the sharps and flats by knowing where the non accidentals were
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#11
Learn the notes on the 5th and 6th strings then use octave shapes to find all the other notes

-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-----------5--------------------G
-------------------------------
-----3--------------------------G now you know all the notes on the 6th 5th and 4th at a glance

-------------------------------
--------------8-----------------G
-------------------------------
------5-------------------------G
-------------------------------
------------------------------- now you know the 6th, 5th and at a glance the 4th and now from that the 2nd

-------------------------------
-------------------------------
---------5----------------------C
-------------------------------
-----3--------------------------C
------------------------------- now since you learned your 5th string you can tell what any note on the 3rd string is from its octave shape from the 5th string


just posted that in another thread =]
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#12
Quote by Americanhoser
I'm learning all the notes on the neck by heart, what ways do you all think are the best for doing this? I mean there is the obvious say aloud while playing them up and down the strings, but does anyone have different more - refined approaches? Help is appreciated.


Another approach would be to get your reading chops together. Once you can read in all positions, you will know your guitar neck well, and on a deep level, which will help alot when studying theory.

Shortcuts help as well.

- if you know the notes on the low strings you can use the octave shape to find the notes on the higher strings. (see above post)

- learn the main notes 1st. If you know those, #s and bs are easy enough to find.

Good luck
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#13
Quote by Peanut1614
Erm E to D# is not an octave? oct = 12? Im pretty sure you know what one is from your other descriptions but the first ones wrong.


I described an octave as a container for notes, where the next E would be the beginning of the next octave rather than part of the current one (this is talking scale-wise, thinking about intervals, so, 1, 2, 3, ect., so the next "1" would be part of the next octave and not the lower one, but it would be THE octave of the root note).

That's where I was coming from.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#14
This is weird I just started this today and yesterday. Then I saw someone else doing it on this thread.

Anyways this is how I'm learning it. I'm learning the notes across each fret and down each fret.

So across would be F A# D# G# C F across the 1st and then I learn the notes on the bottom E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E.

I also plan to learn sheet music during this period after I finished this, and learn the tab equivilant to the notes such as 2 on the fourth string would be A.
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#15
Quote by MadassAlex
I described an octave as a container for notes, where the next E would be the beginning of the next octave rather than part of the current one (this is talking scale-wise, thinking about intervals, so, 1, 2, 3, ect., so the next "1" would be part of the next octave and not the lower one, but it would be THE octave of the root note).

That's where I was coming from.


I totally understand where your coming from but its wrong, that last E is the end of the octave AND the start of a new one. 12 semitones = octave yes? 12 semitones takes you from E to E. Hence if you play a 1 octave E major scale you start and end on E.

And Bishop usually the strings go from high E up, so the highest string is 1, B is 2 etc. I think you've got it the wrong way around? Since Fret 2 on the 4th is an E...
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

Last edited by Peanut1614 at Jun 30, 2007,
#16
Quote by Peanut1614
I totally understand where your coming from but its wrong, that last E is the end of the octave AND the start of a new one. 12 semitones = octave yes? 12 semitones takes you from E to E. Hence if you play a 1 octave E major scale you start and end on E.

And Bishop usually the strings go from high E up, so the highest string is 1, B is 2 etc. I think you've got it the wrong way around? Since Fret 2 on the 4th is an E...


If you include open strings, that's 13.

But yeah, I goofed.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#17
Quote by MadassAlex
If you include open strings, that's 13.

But yeah, I goofed.


13 what? Im confused
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#18
There's some pretty good computer programs you can use to learn the fretboard quite fast. I use a program called Absolute Fretboard Trainer PRO, it's awesome.

The good thing about this program is that you can learn the notes in several ways and you can also decide which parts of the neck you want to learn.
#19
Quote by Peanut1614
13 what? Im confused


He is confused perhaps; 12 semitones will include the first E note but not the E note that begins the next octave, that will be part of the next octave. The oepn E will be part of the first octave, the 12th fret of the second octave....
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#20
Quote by Americanhoser
He is confused perhaps; 12 semitones will include the first E note but not the E note that begins the next octave, that will be part of the next octave. The oepn E will be part of the first octave, the 12th fret of the second octave....


12 semi tones from E will get you to the next E?? E 1 F 2 F# 3 G 4 G# 5 A 6 A# 7 B 8 C 9 C# 10 D 11 D# 12 E....
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#21
Quote by Peanut1614
12 semi tones from E will get you to the next E?? E 1 F 2 F# 3 G 4 G# 5 A 6 A# 7 B 8 C 9 C# 10 D 11 D# 12 E....


I was saying that yeah E on the 12th fret was not the ending of the 1 st octave but the beginning of the next.
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They've outlawed the number one vegetable on the planet.


Start a fire for a man and keep him warm for a day, start that same man on fire and he will be warm for life.