#2
They are soldered together, then taped together. They could then be taped somewhere else to keep them from floating around in the cavity. You could tape them to the big black wire if you want.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#4
Yeah, tape whatever of the wire itself is exposed.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#6
What do you mean by that?
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#9
You're better off just wiring all the grounds to one spot (like a ring connector or a washer, not a pot) and then running a wire from that spot to your ground (bridge claw).

Besides, if you don't have a good soldering gun, you could easily damage the pots by soldering stuff onto them.
In the Oven:

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#10
The red and white wires are used for a coil split. If you want to run the humbucker in single coil, you wire the red and white to a switch that goes to ground when you flip it on.

I use a push-pull pot to do this.
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#11
Quote by Kultur Vultur
You're better off just wiring all the grounds to one spot (like a ring connector or a washer, not a pot) and then running a wire from that spot to your ground (bridge claw).

Besides, if you don't have a good soldering gun, you could easily damage the pots by soldering stuff onto them.


Soldering guns are a no-no for guitar electronics. They're too big, and they have too much voltage. Soldering irons (sometimes called soldering pencils) are what you need.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#12
Quote by Will_Minus
Soldering guns are a no-no for guitar electronics. They're too big, and they have too much voltage. Soldering irons (sometimes called soldering pencils) are what you need.

Hah, slip of the tongue, I promise.
In the Oven:

18 Watt!