#1
Okay I know what your thinking, theres been like 20 threads asking the same thing in the past 24 hours and ive been waiting for one of them to answer my questions, I just started learning the pentatonic scales like yesterday ive memorized C Major and A minor and B minor but thats aside the point basically Im trying to learn improvisation, and I am having trouble applying these scales to songs Im listening to, Ill be playing an RHCP song and I will start playing some notes out of well in this case the A minor pentatonic scale, Then I will attept to make a bunch of notes sound good, mabye throw in some triplets or quads or pinch harmonics I dont know Random SH**, thats just a basic idea of where im at. Im really confused still . I think what Im trying to ask for is a list of songs that I can use the pentatonic scales on for practice.

MAIN QUESTION - HOW THE HE** DID U GUYS LEARN HOW TO IMPROV, LISTEN FOR KEY CHANGES, TRAIN YOUR EAR, ECT.

Thanks again guys
#2
It's not just about the notes you play. Rhythm has a huge impact on your improvising.

Do you have a piano? If so, try playing something, anything, only using the black keys. You will be playing in F# Major, specifically the F# Major pentatonic scale. Simply banging on these keys will not lead to anything that sounds great, but with some great rhythm, articulation and dynamics, you can create a pretty cool piece from just the black keys. Try this same exercise using only white keys, which is the C Major scale. You'll find you have more options, thanks to those two all-important notes, the IV and VII. Also, when improvising with the pentatonic scale, don't be afraid to hit the IV or VII note ever so often. They are very tense sounding notes that resolve well to the tonic note.

Just keep practicing, it'll come.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#3
Wait so are you saying that when using the pentatonics not all the notes fit? Im really confused
#5
I'm saying that the notes aren't the only things that matter, and playing just any note from the scale will not sound good. In your case, trying to improvise over a song, you need to know what chords are being played underneath your melody. If the band is playing an A minor chord and you're soloing in Am pentatonic you should probably start or end the measure with a note from that chord, but you don't have to, I'm just trying to give you something to think about.

Improvising isn't just hitting notes from the proper scale of intervals, you've got to take melody in to account. You need to take the listener somewhere, there should be ups and downs, dynamic changes, tension, a climax, and a resolution.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#6
Very interesting but im still having trouble knowing what excactly to practice, Oh and ya I dont even know what chords they are playing here Ill give you an example of what Im doing. But I like the way you look at music by the way.

RHCP - Tell me Baby, over this song I will play Am notes from the scale (the entire time)
3 doors down - Kryptonite, I will play Bm over this song (the entire time)

I just feel there is ALOT more to learn.
#7
well there are different ways to improvise you can learn some licks, *use the melody* in your case this would be a good place to start, you can embellish the chords (but you dont know exactly what they are playing so that would be hard) etc. There is more to improvising than just playing notes of a scale. Plus you dont always have to use the notes on the scales you can play out of the scale as long as it sounds good.

but learning scales are a good place to start. just dont try specifically to a song try playing over an easy chord progression
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
Last edited by fenderuser93 at Jul 6, 2007,
#8
The song tell me baby isn't in the key of Am, which is probably a major reason of why it's sounding wrong.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#9
Quote by MsOsRsEiLcLkO
Very interesting but im still having trouble knowing what excactly to practice, Oh and ya I dont even know what chords they are playing here

I just feel there is ALOT more to learn.


You HAVE to know what chords they're playing and what key it's in. You can't just
hope Am pentatonic will work.

So, the first thing to learn is what chords they play the song in.
#11
It's all about phrasing. A good exercise to develop phrasing is: without playing anything, think of a little melody/lick/phrase in you head, sing it, and then try to play it on the guitar. Don't play anything until you know what you want it to sound like, then try to get it.

Thats a big part of my outlook on soloing - think, and know what you're trying to do. If you don't know what you want you'll just play anything, which will sound lame. Dont be afraid to sustain notes to give yourself time to think.

And yes, Melodic Control is super-fantastic - but maybe a little over your head... you need to know the chords being played and the notes in them, and you need to be able to find those notes on the fretboard.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#12
lol start with blues based classic rock, or even the blues. key changes are pretty rare.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


UG's Best DIY PedalBoard
#13
Backing tracks man. Go pick up a 'Let's Jam' CD at the store. That's how I learned.