#1
Hey there,

My first post on the forums so I'll start off with what could potentially be something that a) has been posted before (sorry it's very late at night) b) is dumb enough to get me laughed at, but here goes.

It amazes me how many great songs are playable using the root chords, what always gets me, however, is that I want to add in those little extra flourishes that really make it sound good for someone else to listen to. A bit of a tenuous example might be something like the extra step-down series of notes/chords in Paul Simons Mrs Robinson in between '.....Jesus, loves you more than you will know...' and '...Whoh whoh whoh'. I've also no knowledge of terminology either, I'm afraid .

Anyway, I rarely find the directions to play these sorts of things in just basic chord tab, however in some songs people appear to put these chords in and I rejoice, but when I go to play them they just sound totally wrong and I don't really understand how they work; they often go down on paper like this: A/B or D/A eg

and seem to be combinations of two chords, but, like I said, when I play them along with the rest of the song they just don't sound right at all. Is there anything that anyone can explain to me about how they should be played or whatever? Just as they're shown on the page or what?

An example link is here to Del Amitri's 'Nothing Ever Happens':

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/d/del_amitri/nothing_ever_happens_ver5_crd.htm

The four chords just before the bridge. When played with the rest of the song, I know how I would like them to sound, but I'm just not getting it.
Apologies for my potential obtuseness, but I'd really like to know
#2
Those are called slash chords. The first letter the chord you play, the second letter is a note you play lower than the rest of the chord (bass note). So, for example, to play an Am/E (A minor with an E bass note):


A minor
0
1
2
2
0
x

Am/E
0
1
2
2
0
0

This is a pretty easy example. Do you get it?
Quote by Mazzakazza
Play Meshuggah. It is the solution.
#3
Yeah, I think I do So you are saying that, for an Am/E, for example, you'd form the Am chord, but hold a finger down on the E string simultaneously as you play it?
#5
The other thing you can do with those is, if your playing with other the bassist or keyboardist can play, the bass note. Or so says the Fake Books.