#2
hmmm... i think that might mean they play scales in diff octaves. not sure tho...
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#4
how would that be easier?
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#7
man, you should be ashamed for asking that question, no offense, but take a music theory course. im not trying to insult you or anything either so dont think im a prick please
#8
Quote by kfkslayerkfk
man, you should be ashamed for asking that question, no offense, but take a music theory course. im not trying to insult you or anything either so dont think im a prick please


Everyone has to start somewhere. He has nothing to be ashamed of.
#9
Quote by kfkslayerkfk
man, you should be ashamed for asking that question, no offense, but take a music theory course. im not trying to insult you or anything either so dont think im a prick please


Why the hell do you think he asked a question? Shame on him for not being manly enough to compare with your IMMENSE theory knowladge, n00bface.
#10
Quote by kfkslayerkfk
man, you should be ashamed for asking that question, no offense, but take a music theory course. im not trying to insult you or anything either so dont think im a prick please


why's that mate???

its only a term used by some guitar players... theres no music theory involved.

and if your not trying to offend, then why the hell post you idiot.
#11
Quote by branny1982

its only a term used by some guitar players... theres no music theory involved.


Nope. It is a theory term that means the same pitch at different tones
#12
Quote by Nihil
how would that be easier?


On power chords really high on the fretboard it might be... but I'm also asking myself how that would be easier in any other situation, it's kind of a pain in the ass to mute the middle string.
#13
Octaves generally wouldn't be used for their "easier" quality, but rather for the effect of doubling the note, perhaps in soloing (like Wes Montgomery).
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#14
Quote by Slipping_Away
On power chords really high on the fretboard it might be... but I'm also asking myself how that would be easier in any other situation, it's kind of a pain in the ass to mute the middle string.


its just another technique, the first finger can easily mute the 5th string, it kinda naturally wants too, or the second finger for that matter... i agree that it is not really easier.

i am familiar with this chord type as i like to play Dave Matthews, who uses it often... i had just never heard the lingo 'playing octaves' to describe it.

obviously, as kfkslayerkfk quite rightly pointed out, i am ashamed for not knowing the name of it. after all its such an important thing to know isnt it....
#15
An octave isn't a chord, it only has one pitch.

A power chord isn't a chord, it only has two pitches.

(twitch)

Anyway, if you're not good with chords, octaves are no substitute at all. Theory is your friend.
#16
Quote by Slipping_Away
On power chords really high on the fretboard it might be... but I'm also asking myself how that would be easier in any other situation, it's kind of a pain in the ass to mute the middle string.


You could ask why you are playing power chords up high on the fret board at all? As you can just move up 1 string and play them 5 frets lower, or 2 strings and 10 frets (this is not an exact formula but you get my drift, if you know the notes its easier)

As far as playing octaves instead of power chords is concerned there are probably 3 main ways to go about it.

D || -3-- <-- Top String
A || -X-- <-- Middle String
E || -1-- <-- Bottom String

Using the index to mute the middle string. Do this by fretting the bottom string but at such an angle that it does not put enough pressure on the middle string, and so will mute it.

Using the ring finger to mute the middle string. When playing a conventional power chord, Using the 3 finger technique (Index for bottom, ring for middle, pinky for Top) Rest the ring finger lightly on the middle string, instead of fretting it, this should mute it nicely.

Using the ring finger to mute the middle string. When playing a conventional power chord, Using the 2 finger technique (Index for bottom, ring for middle and top string.)
Fret the top string with the ring finger, but place it so the tip of the ring finger just touches the side of the middle string, and should mute it.

Hope that was all relevant and helpful


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#17
I play it with my middle and my pinky, resting my pointer finger across all of the strings to mute them.
#18
Quote by NotAJock2Day
An octave isn't a chord, it only has one pitch.

A power chord isn't a chord, it only has two pitches.

(twitch)

Anyway, if you're not good with chords, octaves are no substitute at all. Theory is your friend.

Replace 'pithes' with 'notes', an octave does have two pitches, but only one note.
For example you could play A (440hz) and A (880hz) - two different pitches.

And (depending on how you play it) a powerchord could have any number of pitches, but yes, only 2 notes.
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#19
Quote by ouchies
I play it with my middle and my pinky, resting my pointer finger across all of the strings to mute them.


Weird. Ive never heard of someone doing it that way. I do it with my index on the low string, ring on the octave, and then middle finger mutes.
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#20
^Same way I do it.

Quote by psychodelia
Octaves generally wouldn't be used for their "easier" quality, but rather for the effect of doubling the note, perhaps in soloing (like Wes Montgomery).

Wes Montgomery used octaves? Never noticed.
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#21
Quote by justin_fraser
Weird. Ive never heard of someone doing it that way. I do it with my index on the low string, ring on the octave, and then middle finger mutes.


i dunno i find it a lot easier to mute all the strings, that way you can hit the other strings if you want that effect. it sounds kinda percussive and cool.
#22
I use my index finger on the bottom string, ring finger on the top and then lean my index finger back so I mute the middle string, is that wrong? lol
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Last edited by Antroid at Jul 5, 2007,
#23
^ i think thats how i do it. as an example "pointer" finger on the A string, ringfinger on the G string and i let my pointer fingers lay against the D string to mute it. im pretty sure thats a fine way to do it, i've never had anybody tell me its wrong.
#24
I do it with my index on the low string and my pinky on the high string, muting the middle string with my index, middle, and ring.

I love using octaves
#25
I use index for the lower one and pinky for the octave. The muting of the string in between is done by my index.
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#26
Quote by Absent Mind
You could ask why you are playing power chords up high on the fret board at all? As you can just move up 1 string and play them 5 frets lower, or 2 strings and 10 frets (this is not an exact formula but you get my drift, if you know the notes its easier)


I'm talking about very high power chords, it's not like I'm playing 15th fret power chords on the first three strings, haha. =P

It simply sounds better to play power chords on ADG than to dip onto thinner strings, often. Unless it's on like the first 5 frets of DGB, I might play them there. I dunno, depends on the song, and it's just a matter of what I think produces the better sound, since that's really what it's all about, no?